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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


65 records – page 1 of 7.

Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-02-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
BD08-04-115
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing with the understanding that routine testing is conducted within the context of the doctor/patient relationship and that clinically appropriate pre- and post-test counselling is conducted.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-02-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
BD08-04-115
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing with the understanding that routine testing is conducted within the context of the doctor/patient relationship and that clinically appropriate pre- and post-test counselling is conducted.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing with the understanding that routine testing is conducted within the context of the doctor/patient relationship and that clinically appropriate pre- and post-test counselling is conducted.
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Vaccination of children

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9236
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-68
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations request governments to promote the vaccination of children where falling rates are threatening public health.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-68
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations request governments to promote the vaccination of children where falling rates are threatening public health.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations request governments to promote the vaccination of children where falling rates are threatening public health.
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Jordan's Principle

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9237
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-69
The Canadian Medical Association supports Jordan's Principle which states that where government services are available to Canadian children and a jurisdictional dispute arises around the cost of the services for Status First Nations and Inuit Indian children, the government of first contact pays the cost then resolves the jurisdictional dispute later.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-69
The Canadian Medical Association supports Jordan's Principle which states that where government services are available to Canadian children and a jurisdictional dispute arises around the cost of the services for Status First Nations and Inuit Indian children, the government of first contact pays the cost then resolves the jurisdictional dispute later.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports Jordan's Principle which states that where government services are available to Canadian children and a jurisdictional dispute arises around the cost of the services for Status First Nations and Inuit Indian children, the government of first contact pays the cost then resolves the jurisdictional dispute later.
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National standards for ambient air quality

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9252
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-82
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to adopt national standards for ambient air quality that are at least as stringent as the leading international standard.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-82
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to adopt national standards for ambient air quality that are at least as stringent as the leading international standard.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to adopt national standards for ambient air quality that are at least as stringent as the leading international standard.
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Exposure to air pollution

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9253
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-83
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to support research to understand the relationship between early childhood exposure to air pollution and long-term health effects that may occur as a result of this exposure.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-83
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to support research to understand the relationship between early childhood exposure to air pollution and long-term health effects that may occur as a result of this exposure.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to support research to understand the relationship between early childhood exposure to air pollution and long-term health effects that may occur as a result of this exposure.
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Endorsement - Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9337
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-05-27
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD08-05-167
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-05-27
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD08-05-167
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines
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Home and community care services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9245
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC08-49
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations will work with provincial/territorial governments to support the creation of integrated service delivery systems for home and community care services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC08-49
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations will work with provincial/territorial governments to support the creation of integrated service delivery systems for home and community care services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations will work with provincial/territorial governments to support the creation of integrated service delivery systems for home and community care services.
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Joint Submission to the Subcommittee on Sport-Related Concussions in Canada House of Commons Standing Committee on Health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14080
Date
2019-01-29
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2019-01-29
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
Based on a well-established collaboration addressing concussion, the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine (CASEM) the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), and the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) are pleased to submit this brief to the Subcommittee on Sport-Related Concussions (SCSC) of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health. About the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine (CASEM) CASEM is a physician member-based organization comprised of 850 medical doctors from many specialties who have specialized training and skills in sport and exercise related injuries/illnesses for active patients of all ages and abilities, including concussion care. CASEM physicians hold national and international leadership roles in concussion care. Namely, at the national level, CASEM chairs the Canadian Concussion Collaborative (CCC) and at the international level, several CASEM members played leadership roles in the development of the International Consensus Statements on Concussion in Sport which is the key document that establishes concussion management recommendation every 4 years. About the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) The CFPC is the professional organization that represents more than 38,000 family physician members across the country. The College establishes the standards for, and accredits, postgraduate family medicine training for Canada’s 17 medical schools. It reviews and certifies continuing professional development programs, and materials, that enable family physicians to meet certification and licensing requirements. The CFPC provides high-quality services, supports family medicine teaching and research, and advocates on behalf of family physicians and the specialty of family medicine. About the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) The Canadian Medical Association unites 85,000 physicians on national health and medical matters. Formed in Quebec City in 1867, the CMA’s rich history of advocacy led to some of Canada’s most important health policy changes. As we look to the future, the CMA will focus on advocating for a healthy population and a vibrant profession. Along with CASEM, the CMA is a co-founding member of the CCC. 3 KEY KEY THEMESTHEMES AND RECOMMENDATIONSAND RECOMMENDATIONS: In this brief, CASEM, CFPC, and the CMA submit a series of recommendations under two key themes. Taken as a whole, we believe these will help inform the Subcommittee’s study on how to improve concussion awareness, prevention and treatment for all Canadians. Background information regarding the groups and initiatives mentioned in the key themes and recommendations, is provided in the subsequent part of this document. KEY THEME #1: The impacts of concussion and the benefits of awareness efforts are slowly becoming better known at the higher levels of sport participation that received support for the implementation of proper concussion management strategies (namely through the Canadian Concussion Protocol Harmonization Project). Further efforts and government funding should address the issue at all levels of sport participation. This must include school-based sport programs, and concussion occurring in other contexts (e.g. leisure, occupation, etc.). RECOMMENDATIONS related to key theme #1: #1.1 The federal government should commission and fund the development and evaluation of additional efforts to improve awareness and proper management of concussion at all levels of sport participation and contexts where concussions occur in Canada. #1.2 Since “key aspects of concussion prevention, detection and management occur prior to, as well as after, the initial medical intervention”1, “public health strategies should be developed and implemented to address the issue of concussions.”1 #1.3 Given their competencies and expertise in this area, “family physicians2 and sport and exercise medicine (SEM) physicians should play a central role in the design and implementation of strategies that work in conjunction with families, schools, sports organizations, employers and governments to educate, support and empower the implementation of proper concussion prevention, detection and management protocols.”1 #1.4 Any future effort to improve concussion awareness and management should, whenever possible, be evidenced-informed, and aim for synergy with ongoing Canadian initiatives. #1.5 Innovative dissemination strategies that have the potential to reach all levels of sport participation and contexts where concussions occur should be considered and evaluated (e.g. massive open online course or MOOC 3). 1 The Role of Family Physicians and physicians with Added Competencies in Sport and Exercise Medicine in a Public Health Approach to Concussions. A joint position statement of CASEM, CFPC, and the CMA. 2017 https://www.cfpc.ca/ProjectAssets/Templates/Resource.aspx?id=4319&langType=4105 2 This is not meant to exclude the possible role of other health care disciplines, such as nurse practitioners, that can be involved in the diagnosis and medical management of concussions in some Canadian jurisdictions. 3 https://www.ulaval.ca/les-etudes/mooc-formation-en-ligne-ouverte-a-tous/commotion-cerebrale-prevention-detection-et-gestion-dans-mon-milieu.html 4 KEY THEME #2: For the majority of Canadians affected by a concussion, family physicians play a central role in concussion identification and management through the recovery process. However, where persistent concussion symptoms arise, family physicians and their patients require timely access to SEM physicians, and multidisciplinary care for the development and implementation of individualized treatment plans. As it presently stands, access to such expert medical and multidisciplinary resources for concussion is very limited (especially in rural and remote regions). To complicate matters, Canadians affected by a concussion are all too often uncertain how best to navigate a health care system that isn’t well organized to address their unique needs. RECOMMENDATIONS related to key theme #2: #2.1 Medical schools and organizations should maintain continuous efforts aiming for the rapid integration of the most current clinical practice recommendations about concussion. #2.2 Initial care for Canadians affected by a concussion should be coordinated by the patient’s family physician. #2.3 To work in collaboration with their family physicians, patients affected by persistent symptoms following a concussion should have timely access to medical experts on concussion and allied professionals with expertise in concussion management. #2.4 The potential of telemedicine strategies or other virtual network to improve access to concussion experts for support in the management of concussion should be considered and evaluated. BACKGROUNDBACKGROUND:: The challenging dynamics of concussion: Sport-related concussion seriously impacts the health and well-being of Canadians across the country; to say nothing of the costs to the health care system and concussed individuals. Canadian statistics show that among children and youth (10-18 years) who visit an emergency department for a sports-related head injury, 39% were diagnosed with concussions, while a further 24% were possible concussions.4 Between 2003 and 2013 in Ontario, a 4.4-fold increase of pediatric concussion-related consultations has been observed, with a sharp increase between 2010 and 2013 and nearly 35000 visits in 2013.5 Although, the precise reasons for this increased incidence of concussion are unknown, the study suggests that “…concussion education and awareness, improved diagnosis of 4 https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage/services/concussions.html 5 Zemek et al. J Pediatr 2017; 181: 222-8 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.10.067) 5 concussion, and revised concussion guidelines advocating stricter follow-up…” played an important role. The body of knowledge regarding concussion is rapidly and constantly changing; a dynamic that is unlikely to change for the foreseeable future. One important limitation of our knowledge about concussion is the lack of information on the true burden of concussion in Canada. A significant proportion of all concussions are not captured by traditional health-related databases, or clinical research, because individuals often do not consult a physician. One positive and recent development that will help better understand the true burden of sport related concussion in youth occurred in November 2018 when a group of more than 30 Canadian researchers including CASEM and CFPC leaders on concussion received $12 million from the National Football League “Play Smart, Play Safe” initiative.6 This 3-year longitudinal cohort study will evaluate diagnostic tools, prognostic indicators, prevention strategies, and treatment strategies. This study will characterize the true incidence rate and recovery characteristics of concussion in high school-based sport settings. Psychological and social factors must also be considered. Attitudes and awareness towards injury are complicating factors that highlight the need for improved concussion prevention and awareness. These include injury minimization, the lack of a visible injury, and a general lack of both pre and post-injury awareness. Those closely associated with a concussed individual (coaches, co-workers, employers, or an injured individual themselves) may have an incentive, or experience pressure, to hide/downplay injury or avoid medical assessment due to stigma.7 The natural human predilection towards downplaying the nature of injury is another important factor to consider, especially where, post-injury, the effects aren’t clearly visible. A concussed individual may lack the mental acuity to be able to understand that their symptoms require medical attention. Another area to consider is the availability of qualified health care resources. Family physicians, whether in primary care settings or emergency departments, and SEM physicians, are generally the first medical professionals seen by a person who has sustained a concussion during a sport, leisure or occupational activity. They are the first point of contact for proper management, advice, and education regarding that person’s gradual return to cognitive (e.g. school and work) and physical activities (e.g. sport, exercise or work).8 Gaps in medical training, and the fast-paced evolution of concussion best practices, means that clinicians sometimes struggle to maintain up-to-date knowledge regarding the detection and treatment of concussions. These factors are further complicated by ambiguous scopes of practice across the multidisciplinary professions involved 6 https://www.ucalgary.ca/utoday/issue/2018-11-16/nfl-gives-significant-funding-help-youth-shred-burden-concussion 7 Delaney J, Caron J, Correa J, et al. Why Professional Football Players Choose not to Reveal their Concussion Symptoms During a Practice or Game. Clin J Sport Med, 2018, 28(1): 1-12. 8 College of Family Physicians of Canada & Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise. Joint Position Statement - The Role of Family Physicians and Physicians with Added Competencies in Sport and Exercise Medicine in a Public Health Approach to Concussions. 2017. 6 with concussion management. Finally, there is general lack of available medical experts on concussion to whom family physicians can refer patients that present persistent symptoms. Our recommendations also take into consideration the following factors:
The simple principles of initial concussion management6-8 are within the scope of practice of family physicians.
In the vast majority (80-90%) of cases, once simple principles of initial management have been implemented, concussion is a condition that will evolve favorably within 7-10 days.8
Even with proper initial management, some concussion patients will present with persistent symptoms that require a multidisciplinary team approach.
“Persistent symptoms” has been defined as more than 4 weeks in youth and more than 2 weeks in adults.9
Access to physicians with added competencies in concussion care (e.g. SEM Physicians, Physiatrists, Neurologists), and allied health professionals with experience in treating specific presentations of concussions is limited, especially in Canada’s rural and remote areas. CASEM & CFPC’s concussion efforts to date: Since 2012, CASEM has played a key role in the evolution of concussion care in Canada by leading the work of the CCC10. The CCC is composed of 18 health organizations concerned with concussions that aim “to improve education about concussions, and the implementation of best practices for the prevention and management of concussions”. The CFPC has been involved with the CCC from the start. In 2015, the CCC published 2 key recommendations in a document entitled “Recommendations for policy development regarding sport-related concussion prevention and management in Canada”11 that state:
Organizations responsible for operating, regulating or planning sport and sporting events with a risk of concussion should be required to develop/adapt and implement a concussion management protocol, based on current best practices, that is customized for their context and available resources.
In situations where timely and sufficient availability of medical resources qualified for concussion management is lacking, multidisciplinary collaborative approaches should be used to improve concussion management outcomes while facilitating access to medical resources where appropriate. Since 2015, the CCC has contributed a multidisciplinary health care perspective to key concussion-related initiatives in Canada. The first of these initiatives was initiated in January 2015 by Sport Canada and led to the creation of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial working group (FTP-WG) on 9 McCrory et al. Consensus statement on concussion in sport. (2017) https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/51/11/838 10 https://casem-acmse.org/resources/canadian-concussion-collaborative/ 11 https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/2/88 7 concussion that brings together sport, education, government and health stakeholders. Later in 2015, the mandate letters from Prime Minister Trudeau asked the Minister of Health and the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities to collaborate on a national strategy on concussion. The Federal government budgeted $1.4 million to allow the Public Health Agency of Canada to work with provinces and territories to develop harmonized concussion management guidelines across Canada.12 Most of that work has been accomplished by funding to Parachute for the development of the Canadian guideline on concussion in sport.13 Members of the CCC and concussion leaders from the CFPC and CASEM were closely involved. Since 2016, one of the CASEM and CFPC leaders on concussion developed a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) to develop general awareness on concussion and facilitate the implementation of proper concussion management protocols in specific settings. After 4 iterations of that French language MOOC, over 8000 participants have accessed it. Presently an English version is being developed in collaboration between Laval University and the University of Calgary. In August 2017, CASEM and CFPC, published a joint position statement entitled “The role of family physicians and physicians with added competencies in sport and exercise medicine in a public health approach to concussions”14 that is directly related to the recommendations presented in this brief. Finally, since mid-2018, CASEM and CFPC have partnered with the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) to completely revamp the CMA’s policy on Head Injury in Sport. To foster high-level advocacy, cultural sensitivity, and awareness messaging on concussion, it has been redeveloped for a host of target audiences from all relevant perspectives. It is set for release in early 2019. CONCLUSIONCONCLUSION: Concussion is a pressing public health issue in Canada. The members of the SCSC should keep in mind that concussions are not limited to higher level organized sport. It’s a sudden, and unwanted challenge that hundreds of unsuspecting and unprepared Canadians face each day. These concussions occur in a range of situations, inside and outside of sports settings, and often go untreated; with a potential for tragic consequences. To truly address the issue and make progress towards the objectives expressed by Prime Minister Trudeau in the mandate letters, the Government of Canada must provide significant investments. To make progress across the spectrum of sports, leisure and other context where concussions 12 https://www.budget.gc.ca/2016/docs/plan/ch5-en.html 13 The Canadian guideline on concussion in sport was part of the Parachute-led Concussion Protocol Harmonization Project. 14 https://www.cfpc.ca/ProjectAssets/Templates/Resource.aspx?id=4319&langType=4105 8 occur, the Government funding should minimally represent a 10-fold increase from the initial $1.4M budgeted in 2016. With their respective membership, tools and resources, CASEM and the CFPC can play an important role in addressing the burden that concussions place on Canadians. With this brief, we are expressing the willingness of our organizations to collaborate with the government in the design and implementation of strategies to systemically address concussion from all causes as a public health issue. To be successful this must occur across all levels of sport participation and include: leisure, school-based sports, occupational activities and address the rural and remote areas of the country. On behalf of CASEM, and the CFPC, we would welcome the opportunity, and privilege, to present and discuss these recommendations with your Committee. Respectfully submitted, Dr. Paul Watson CASEM President Dr. Pierre Fremont Chair of the CFPC’s SEM Committee and Past President of CASEM Dr.Tatiana Jevremovic Past President of CASEM Dr. Gigi Osler CMA President Contacts: Dawn Haworth, Executive Director, CASEM dhaworth@casem-acmse.org 613 748 5851 – ext 1 Artem Safarov, Director of Health Policy and Government Relations, CFPC asafarov@cfpc.ca 905-629-0900 x 249
Documents
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Health Canada consultation on edible cannabis, extracts & topicals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14020
Date
2019-02-20
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2019-02-20
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association appreciates this opportunity to respond to Health Canada’s consultation on the proposed regulations for edible cannabis, cannabis extracts, and cannabis topicals. The CMA’s approach to cannabis is grounded in public health policy. It includes promotion of health and prevention of problematic use; access to assessment, counselling and treatment services; and a harm reduction perspective. The CMA endorsed the Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines and has expressed these views in our recommendations to the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation, recommendations regarding Bill C-45. As well, we submitted comments to Health Canada with respect to the consultation on the proposed regulatory approach for the Cannabis Act, Bill C-45. Canada’s physicians have a longstanding concern about the health risks associated with consuming cannabis. , Consumers use these products for both recreational and medical purposes, compelling the need for accuracy in the labeling as well as quality control in the manufacturing process.10 Cannabis Edibles, Extracts and Topicals Cannabis will have a different effect on the user, depending on whether it is smoked or ingested, as in an edible. It has been found that “smoking marijuana results in clinical effects within 10 minutes, peak blood concentrations occur between 30 and 90 minutes, and clearance is complete within 4 hours of inhalation. Oral THC does not reach significant blood concentration until at least 30 minutes, with a peak at approximately 3 hours, and clearance approximately 12 hours after ingestion.” Because of the delay in absorption when ingested, people might consume more to feel the psychoactive effects faster. This might lead to the consumption of very high doses and result in toxic effects, such as anxiety, paranoia and in rare cases, a psychotic reaction with delusions, hallucinations, incoherent speech and agitation. Rates of use of edibles are not well known. A recent study in California high schools found that “polyuse via multiple administration methods was a predominant pattern of cannabis use and report the first evidence, to our knowledge, of triple product polyuse of combustible, edible, and vaporized cannabis among youths.” We are limiting our response to Health Canada’s consultation questions that pertain to the CMA’s position with respect to cannabis and relate to our expertise and knowledge base. Proposed THC limits for the new classes of cannabis products Standardization within all classes of cannabis products in a legal regime is essential. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels in black market products can vary widely so one can never be assured of the strength being purchased, creating the potential for significant harm. , Experience in jurisdictions where cannabis has been legalized has shown that restrictions on the potency of products (i.e., THC limits) are necessary, given the higher risks of harm associated with higher potencies.2 Prohibition of high potency products is important.3 THC limits should be based on the best available evidence of safety for consumers. The increased potency of cannabis over the years raises concerns about its use in edibles, extracts and topicals, offering a significant challenge with respect to regulating their use. This becomes particularly worrisome with respect to preadolescents and adolescents who should avoid using cannabis due to concerns with the impact on the developing brain.2 Use has been associated with a “significant increased risk of developing depression or suicidality in young adulthood.” More research is needed with respect to the effects of cannabis on all age groups, especially children, adolescents and seniors. Saunders et al describe the case of an elderly patient with a history of coronary artery disease suffering what appears to have been a myocardial infarction after ingesting most of a marijuana lollipop that contained 90 mg of THC. Such cases demonstrate how crucial it is to establish appropriate levels of THC. This is an especially important consideration because “consuming cannabis-infused edibles may inadvertently result in toxicity because absorption can take hours, compared with minutes when smoking. An individual who does not yet feel an effect may over-consume.” Small children and people with cognitive impairment will not be able to read labels, so preventive measures are very important, as with any pharmaceutical. Since legalizing cannabis, Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center has reported an increase in calls related to edible exposures. Children can accidentally eat products that contain cannabis, making them ill enough to seek medical assistance. The CMA maintains that the proposed draft regulations of 10 mg per discrete unit and package is too high and should be established at a maximum of 5 mg per dose, given the higher risks of overconsumption with edibles, the risks of accidents in children and the experience in other jurisdictions. Colorado’s limit was set at 10 mg per unit, and health authorities recognize that a lower limit would have been warranted to prevent more accidents. Other preventive measures, such as child proof packaging, are considered in other sections of this brief. The amount of THC must be displayed clearly and prominently on the package to help prevent accidental or overconsumption of the product. Rules addressing the types of ingredients and additives that could be used in edible cannabis, cannabis extracts, and cannabis topicals appropriately address public health and safety risks while enabling sufficient product diversity The CMA concurs with the proposed regulations. Experience in areas such as caffeinated, high-sugar alcoholic beverages provides ample evidence to proceed with restraint concerning the types of ingredients and additives that may be permitted in edible cannabis, cannabis extracts, and cannabis topicals. Proposed new rules for the packaging and labelling of the new classes of cannabis products The CMA reiterates its position with respect to the packaging and labelling of cannabis products as presented in its submission on the proposed approach to the regulation of cannabis.5 This includes:
a requirement for plain and standard packaging
prohibition of the use of appealing flavours and shapes,
a requirement for adequate content and potency labelling,
a requirement for comprehensive health warnings,
a requirement for childproof packaging, and
a requirement that the content in a package should not be sufficient to cause an overdose. Plain and standardized packaging is necessary with respect to edibles as their wider availability raises several public health issues, not the least of which is ingestion by young children. It is imperative that the packages and labels of edibles not resemble popular confectionaries, for example. As the Canadian Paediatric Society has noted, “the unintended consumption of edibles manufactured to look like sweets by younger children is particularly concerning.”15 Also, by “restricting the extent to which marijuana edibles can look and taste like familiar sweets, (it) could also keep the psychological barriers to marijuana initiation among children and adolescents from being lowered.” The CMA has adopted similar positions with respect to tobacco and vaping products. , , It is recognized that these regulations are targeted at products meant for the adult market, but the entry of these new classes also creates challenges beyond that audience. Teens are attracted to vaping cannabis rather than smoking it because “smoke is not combusted and also may allow for more covert use given the reduction in odor.” , As well, as “edibles have no odor, they are largely undetectable to parents.”23 The CMA views this as an opportunity to educate Canadians about the health, social and economic harms of cannabis especially in young people. Package inserts must outline and reinforce the health risks involved; they must also be designed by governments and health professionals, not cannabis producers or distributors. Inserts should include:5
information on securing the product in the home to prevent access by youth and children,
recommendations not to drive or to work with hazardous chemicals or operate equipment while using the contents of the package,
information on the health and social consequences (including legal penalties) of providing cannabis to those under a designated minimum age for purchasing, and
contact information for hotlines for poison control and for crisis support. Cannabis topicals, as outlined in the proposed regulations, would fall under the category of health products and be found in non-prescription drugs, natural health products, and cosmetics. The CMA believes that all health claims need to be substantiated with sufficient evidence that meets standards for efficacy, besides safety and quality, to protect Canadians from misleading claims.5 This is important because the level of proof required to obtain a Drug Identification Number (DIN) for prescription drugs is considerably higher than the level of proof required for a Natural Product Number (NPN); rigorous scientific evidence for effectiveness is needed for a DIN but not for an NPN. Consumers generally do not know about this distinction, believing that Health Canada has applied the same level of scrutiny to the health claims made for every product.5 Requirements for tamper-resistant and child-proof containers need to be in place to enhance consumer safety. More research is required to address the environmental concerns with extra packaging, which would result from single dose packaging. It is critical to put in place measures that make it difficult to ingest large doses of THC. Simply adding grooves to chocolate bars or baked goods, for example, separating different doses, is insufficient to prevent people, particularly children, from ingesting more than a dose (which in of itself is designed for an adult). As well, there is no guarantee that the THC is spread out uniformly throughout the product. More research is needed with respect to “determining risks and benefits through proper clinical trials;” that includes determining the safest level of THC for extracts and topicals to reassure consumers will not be harmed by these products.18 With regards to cannabidiol (CBD), it would seem that “published data from around the world has taught us that misleading labels as well as harmful contaminants are real and actual problems for CBD products.”18 Health claims need to be substantiated via a strong evidentiary process. There will be a need for careful monitoring of the health products released in the market and the health claims made.5 Experience has shown that regulations can and will be circumvented, and these activities will have to be addressed. Edible cannabis and the requirement for all products to be labelled with a cannabis-specific nutrition facts table Yes. The CMA supports the use of a cannabis-specific nutrition facts table (NFT) as described in the proposed regulations.1 These products should have the same standards and regulations applied to them as traditional food products do under the Food and Drugs Regulations. As such, a cannabis-specific nutrition facts table will help consumers differentiate them from standard food products. The proposal for the labelling of small containers and the option to display certain information on a peel-back or accordion panel The size of the container should not be an impediment to supplying consumers with the necessary information to make informed choices. Manufacturers should be required to use whatever method (peel-back or accordion panel) is most efficient and conveys all the necessary information. As the CMA noted in a recent brief with respect to tobacco labeling the “amount of space given to the warnings should be sufficient to convey the maximum amount of information while remaining clear, visible, and legible. The warnings should be in proportion to the packaging available, like that of a regular cigarette package.”20 Adding warnings on individual cigarettes, as we recommended, illustrates that it is feasible to apply important information to even the smallest surfaces.20 It is important to note that key information should be visible on the external part of the container, including the standardized cannabis symbol, ingredients and warnings. Proposal that the standardized cannabis symbol would be required on vaping devices, vaping cartridges, and wrappers Yes. As noted earlier, the CMA called for strict packaging requirements around both tobacco and vaping products.22 The requirement for the standardized cannabis symbol is an extension of that policy and to the labelling of cannabis products in general.5 Proposed new good production practices, such as the requirement to have a Preventive Control Plan, appropriately address the risks associated with the production of cannabis, including the risk of product contamination and cross-contamination Yes. The CMA concurs with this requirement. The requirement that the production of edible cannabis could not occur in a building where conventional food is produced Yes. The CMA concurs with this requirement. Separate facilities are necessary to prevent cross-contamination for the protection of consumer health and safety. Conclusion The CMA supports the federal government’s commitment to a three-year legislative review as it affords the opportunity to evaluate the regulations’ impact and adjust them as needed. It continues to be important to have good surveillance and monitoring systems, as well as to continue to learn from other jurisdictions where cannabis is legal for recreational purposes. Public education and awareness must accompany the introduction of new forms of cannabis, emphasizing the risks of accidental ingestion and overconsumption. It should also emphasize the need for safe storage of cannabis products, as well as personal possession limits. Much more research is needed into the impact of these new classes across all age groups, and into public health strategies that discourage use and increase harm reduction practices. It is fundamental that profit driven commercialization is rigorously controlled through taxation, regulation, monitoring and advertising controls, in a manner that is consistent with a public health approach. Government of Canada. Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 51: Regulations Amending the Cannabis Regulations (New Classes of Cannabis) Ottawa: Health Canada; 2018. Available: http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2018/2018-12-22/html/reg4-eng.html (accessed 2018 Dec 22). Fischer B, Russell C, Sabioni P, et al. Lower-risk cannabis use guidelines: A comprehensive update of evidence and recommendations. AJPH. 2017 Aug;107(8):e1-e12. Available: https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2017.303818?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed& (accessed 2019 Feb 01). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Legalization, regulation and restriction of access to marijuana. CMA submission to the Government of Canada – Task Force on cannabis, legalization and regulation. Ottawa: CMA; 2016 Aug 29. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11954 (accessed 2019 Feb 01). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Bill C-45: The Cannabis Act. Submission to the House of Commons Health Committee. Ottawa: CMA; 2017 Aug 18. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13723 (accessed 2019 Feb 01). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Proposed Approach to the Regulation of Cannabis. Ottawa: CMA; 2018 Jan 19. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13838 (accessed 2019 Feb 04). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Health risks and harms associated with the use of marijuana. CMA Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health. Ottawa: CMA; 2014. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11138 (accessed 2019 Feb 14). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). A public health perspective on cannabis and other illegal drugs. CMA Submission to the Special Senate Committee on Illegal Drugs. Ottawa: CMA; 2002. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1968 (accessed 2019 Feb 14). Monte A, Zane R, Heard K. The Implications of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado JAMA. 2015 January 20; 313(3): 241–242 Available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4404298/ (accessed 2019 Feb 15). Peters E, Bae D, Barrington-Trimis J, et al. Prevalence and Sociodemographic Correlates of Adolescent Use and Polyuse of Combustible, Vaporized, and Edible Cannabis Products JAMA Network Open. 2018;1(5): e182765. Available: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2703946 (accessed 2019 Feb 15). Wyonch R. Regulation of Edible and Concentrated Marijuana Products Intelligence Memos. Toronto: CD Howe Institute: 2018 Oct 2. Available: https://www.cdhowe.org/sites/default/files/blog_Rosalie_1002.pdf (accessed 2019 Feb 01). Vandrey R, Raber JC, Raber ME, et al. Cannabinoid Dose and Label Accuracy in Edible Medical Cannabis Products. Research Letter JAMA 2015 Jun 23-30;313(24):2491-3. Available: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2338239 (accessed 2019 Feb 06). Cascini F, Aiello C, Di Tanna G. Increasing Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol ( -9-THC) Content in Herbal Cannabis Over Time: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Curr Drug Abuse Rev. 2012 Mar;5(1):32-40. Available: https://www.datia.org/datia/resources/IncreasingDelta9.pdf (accessed 2019 Feb 14). Gobbi G, Atkin T, Zytynski T, et al. Association of Cannabis Use in Adolescence and Risk of Depression, Anxiety, and Suicidality in Young Adulthood. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis JAMA Psychiatry. 2019 Feb 13. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.4500. Available: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/article-abstract/2723657 (accessed 2019 Feb 15). Saunders A, Stevenson RS. Marijuana Lollipop-Induced Myocardial Infarction. Can J Cardiol. 2019 Feb;35(2):229. Available: https://www.onlinecjc.ca/article/S0828-282X(18)31324-2/fulltext (accessed: 2019 Feb 11). Grant CN, Bélanger RE.Cannabis and Canada’s children and youth. Paediatr Child Health. 2017 May;22(2):98-102. Available: https://www.cps.ca/en/documents/position/cannabis-children-and-youth (accessed 2019 Feb 06). Denver Public Heath. Substance Use Exposure Dashboard. Denver: Denver Public Health; 2018. Available: http://www.denverpublichealth.org/community-health-promotion/substance-misuse/substance-use-exposure-dashboard (accessed 2019 Feb 06). Neuwirth, J. (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment). Personal interview. (2019 Jan 30). Paradis C, April N, Cyr C, et al. The Canadian alcopop tragedy should trigger evidence-informed revisions of federal alcohol regulations. Drug Alcohol Rev. 2019 Feb 4. Available: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/dar.12896 (accessed 2019 Feb 14). MacCoun, RJ, Mello MM, Half-Baked — The Retail Promotion of Marijuana Edibles. N Engl J Med 2015; 372:989-991. Available: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1416014 (accessed 2019 Feb 5). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Health Canada Consultation on Tobacco Products Regulations (Plain and Standardized Appearance). Ottawa: CMA; 2018. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13930 (accessed 2019 Feb 05). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Health Canada’s Consultation on New Health-related Labelling for Tobacco Products Ottawa: CMA; 2018. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13939 (accessed 2019 Feb 05). Canadian Medical Association (CMA) CMA’s Recommendations for Bill S-5: An Act to amend the Tobacco Act and the Non-smokers’ Health Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts Ottawa: CMA; 2017 Apr 7. Available: https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13641 (accessed 2019 Feb 05). Johnson RM, Brooks-Russell A, Ma M, et al. Usual Modes of Marijuana Consumption Among High School Students in Colorado. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2016;77(4):580-8. Available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4987070/pdf/jsad.2016.77.580.pdf (accessed 2019 Feb 06). Friese B, Slater MD, Annechino R, et al. Teen Use of Marijuana Edibles: A Focus Group Study of an Emerging Issue. J Prim Prev. 2016 June 37(3):303–309. Available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4864086/pdf/nihms-766186.pdf (accessed 2019 Feb 06).
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Concussion in Sport, Leisure, and Occupational Settings

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14023
Date
2019-03-02
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  2 documents  
Policy Type
Policy document
Date
2019-03-02
Replaces
Head injury and sport (2011)
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
Concussions and head injuries are a common occurrence in sport and leisure activities, and frequently occur in occupational settings as well. While the majority of individuals who suffer from a concussion will recover with time, others may be at risk for serious and lasting complications. These include (1) children; (2) previous history of head injury or concussion; (3) prior mental health symptoms; and (4) missed diagnosis and management. This aim of this advocacy and policy document is to improve safety during activity by raising awareness of concussions, and by working to improve the detection and safe management of concussions when they occur. It is not a clinical practice guideline. It should not be perceived as a plea to avoid sports or leisure activities, but rather as a call for safer sporting, leisure, and occupational practices. The documented health benefits that result from establishing an active lifestyle in youth and maintaining it throughout life cannot be overstated. Achieving balance of safe play in sport, leisure and occupational activities while promoting greater physical activity levels for Canadians would have the effect of reducing health care costs in Canada, while promoting a healthier concussion recovery culture for all Canadians. Therefore, to promote better concussion and head trauma awareness and prevention, as well as better management/treatment practices, the following policy recommendations for key target audiences across all levels of sport, leisure, and occupational activity are made. Key Concussion & Head Injury Principles: a) The detection of concussions and head injury should be a shared responsibility and any stakeholder/observer to such an injury should verbally raise their concerns that a concussion may have occurred. i. It is important to understand that individuals with a possible concussion, or head injury, may not be able to recognize that they are suffering from a concussion; ii. It is important to recognize that engrained within popular culture are dangerous notions (e.g., to minimize, ignore, downplay, or play through the pain, etc.) that cause individuals/observers to ignore the real, often hidden, dangers of such injuries. b) Broadly speaking, access to the latest edition of the internationally recognized Concussion Recognition Tool (CRT) should be promoted/available to help identify the signs and symptoms of a possible concussion; c) Any individual who sustains more than a minor head injury should be immediately removed from play, activity, or occupation, and not permitted to return on the same day3 (regardless of whether a concussion is later suspected). i. These individuals should be the subject of observation for developing/evolving concussion symptoms or emergency warning signs (especially within the first 4 hours post-injury, but also up to 48 hours when red-flag symptoms are present). d) Following first aid principles, where an individual displays signs of a serious head or spinal injury, that individual should lie still (not moving their head or neck) until a qualified individual has performed an evaluation; to determine whether emergency evacuation for medical assessment is necessary. e) Any individual with a suspected concussion (especially where red-flag symptoms are present), or more severe traumatic brain injury, should be promptly evaluated by a physician to: i. Either rule-out or confirm a diagnosis via an appropriate medical assessment; and ii. Institute the provision of an age-appropriate follow-up care plan (including progressive return to school, work, and play protocols) if such an injury is confirmed.1 f) Ideally, a physician knowledgeable in concussion management determines when, and how, a concussed individual should progressively return to both cognitive (school or work) and physical activities. g) Following a suspected, or diagnosed concussion, an individual should not return to play, or resume any activity associated with a heightened risk of head trauma, until cleared by a physician to do so.1 Recommendations For: 1. Physicians: Should: a) Where possible, encourage safe play practices in sports, and where appropriate, educate patients about the risks of head injuries (associated with high-risk behavior in sports, leisure and occupational activities). b) Gain/maintain, through relevant continuous medical education, competencies related to the assessment, diagnosis and management of concussion according to most current clinical practice recommendations (e.g., latest edition of the CRT, SCAT, Child SCAT, Acute Concussion Evaluation Tool, etc.). c) Be aware that clinical practice guidelines and assessment tools exist to assist in assessing and treating concussed individuals (e.g., Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Parachute Canada, etc.). d) When assessing a patient with a potential concussion: i. Rule out the presence of more severe traumatic brain and musculoskeletal injury; ii. Assess for any previous concussion history, risk factors and newly arising complications; iii. Educate and instruct parents, athletes and any individual that sustains a concussion about what to do, and what to expect, in the post concussive phase. (This should be based on the most current age-appropriate concussion management guidelines);4 iv. Provide individualized recommendations on how to optimally apply the progressive return-to-school, work, and play strategies with consideration for the specificities of the patient’s usual activities and responsibilities;4 v. Work to provide concussed patients timely access for medical reassessment in the event of worsening or persistent symptoms (including mental health); and vi. In the presence of persistent or worsening symptoms (including mental health), consider what external, evidence based, concussion resources may be necessary as well as referral. 2. Medical Colleges & Faculties: Should: a) Promote/support medical education regarding; awareness, detection/diagnosis; and the appropriate management of concussions, throughout the continuum of medical education (undergraduate, post-graduate, and continuing medical education). b) Support research in concussion prevention, detection, and treatment or management. 3. Athletes in Contact/Collision Sports: Should: a) (Prior to the commencement of the sporting season) be given age-appropriate instruction2 to understand: i. How to identify the signs and symptoms of a possible concussion using the latest edition of the internationally recognized CRT (e.g. Concussion Recognition Tool, or Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT)); ii. The risks associated with concussion (including long term and mental health); especially, the risks of potentially life-threatening complications associated with continued sport participation, while presenting with signs or symptoms of a possible concussion; iii. What to do/expect if a concussion is ever suspected (including for teammates), and the expected role of the athlete and team members; iv. Removal and progressive returns to school, work and play policies/procedures, and the expected role of the athlete in the recovery process; and v. How to foster a healthy sporting culture (that promotes: safe play practices; fosters concussion/injury prevention and reporting; peer-to-peer support; and combat injury stigmatization). b) Have such instruction reinforced periodically throughout the sporting season as needed. c) Be aware of, and seek treatment for, potentially serious mental health issues that may arise post-concussive injury. 4. Parents with Minors in Contact/Collision Sports: Should: a) Prior to the commencement of a sporting season, request and be open to receiving instruction2 on: i. How to identify the signs and symptoms of a possible concussion using the latest edition of the internationally recognized CRT (e.g. Concussion Recognition Tool, or Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT)); ii. The risks associated with concussion; especially, the risks of potentially life-threatening complications associated with continued sport participation, while presenting with signs or symptoms of a possible concussion; iii. What to do/expect if a concussion is ever suspected for an athlete; iv. Removal and progressive returns to school, work and play policies/procedures, and the expected role of the parent(s) in the recovery process; and v. How to foster a healthy sporting culture that promotes: safe play practices; fosters concussion/injury prevention and reporting; peer-to-peer support; and combats injury stigmatization. b) Have such instruction reinforced periodically throughout the sporting season as needed. c) Be prepared to address potentially serious mental health issues that may arise post-concussive injury. 5. Individuals Who Sustain a Head Injury Outside of Organized Sports: Should: a) Be aware of possible signs and symptoms of a possible concussion, and immediately withdraw from activity and seek medical assessment a possible concussion is suspected.1 i. Refer to the latest addition of the internationally recognized CRT (Concussion Recognition Tool) for further guidance on signs and symptoms.3 b) Understand the risks associated with concussion; including the risks of potentially life-threatening complications associated with repeated head injury if signs or symptoms of a possible concussion are present. c) In the event of a diagnosis of concussion, judiciously implement the medical recommendations received regarding their gradual return to cognitive and physical activity (including the need for medical reassessment in the presence of persistent symptoms). d) Openly communicate their recovery needs and work with any group or individual who might support them in their recovery process (e.g., employers, family members, school, etc.). e) Be aware of, and seek treatment for, potentially serious mental health issues that may arise post-concussive injury. 6. Coaches, Trainers, Referees, & First Responders: Should: a) Receive certified emergency first aid training. b) Receive periodic education (ideally annually) on national standards regarding the signs and symptoms, potential long-term consequences, appropriate steps for initial intervention, and immediate management (including: athlete removal-from-play; observation; determining when medical assessment is necessary; and progressive return to school, work and play procedures). c) Be trained in the use of the latest edition of the internationally recognized CRT (Concussion Recognition Tool) – to detect whether an injured individual is suffering from a concussion.2 d) Be knowledgeable and responsible to ensure safety and safe play practices are applied throughout the sporting season. e) Be responsible for fostering a healthy sporting culture (promote safe play practices, foster concussion/injury prevention and reporting, peer-to-peer support and combat injury stigmatization). f) Be prepared to address potentially serious mental health issues that may arise post-concussive injury. 7. Licensed Health Care Providers Involved as Therapists in Sport Environments: Should: a) Be fully licensed in their professional field and pursue continuing professional development to maintain competencies related to concussion and head injuries. b) Promote the implementation of properly adapted concussion management protocols (that comply with the most current clinical recommendations, based on consideration for the specificities of each sport environment and available resources). c) Work with qualified physicians to initiate/implement tailored medically supervised concussion management protocols that define: i. Mutual and shared health professional responsibilities to optimize the quality, and safety of patient care (within one’s scope of practice); and ii. The optimal corridors for timely access to medical (re)assessment with due consideration for available resources. d) Be prepared to address potentially serious mental health issues that may arise post-concussive injury. 8. Educational Institutions & Sports Organizations: Should: a) (Especially in the cases involving minors) implement, and keep updated, prevention strategies to include: i. Safety standards that include safe play policies; and ii. Mandatory safety gear/equipment (tailored to individual sport settings). b) Mandatory concussion and head injury protocols that work to: i. Reduce the occurrence of concussions and head injury by promoting: safe play practices; fostering concussion/injury prevention and reporting; peer-to-peer support, and combatting injury stigmatization; ii. Ensure the prompt detection, and standardized early management of concussion and head injuries, by informing all potential stakeholders (in the preseason phase) about the nature/risks of concussion and head injury, and how any such occurrence will be dealt with should they occur; iii. Enshrine into practice removal-from-play, and post-injury observation of athletes; iv. Progressively reintegrate students back into symptom guided educational and physical activities based on the most current recommendations;2 v. Reintegrate injured athletes back into unrestricted training activities and sport once medical clearance has been obtained; and vi. Foster better lines of communication for injury management/recovery between: parents, athletes, coaches, school personnel, therapists and physicians. vii. Address potentially serious mental health issues that may arise post-concussive injury. 9. Employers (Occupational Considerations) Should: a) Comply with workplace safety laws and implement safety standards to reduce the incidence of head injuries in the work environment. b) Integrate considerations for concussion and head injury in health and safety protocols that work to: i. Reduce the occurrence of concussions and head injury by promoting: safe practices; concussion/injury prevention and reporting; peer-to-peer support, and combats injury stigmatization; ii. Ensure prompt detection and standardized early management of concussion and head injuries by informing potential stakeholders about the nature/risks of concussion and head injury, and how occurrences will be dealt with should they occur; iii. Enshrine into practice/ workplace culture the removal-from-work, and post-injury observation of workers; iv. Progressively reintegrate workers back into symptom guided cognitive and physical activities based on the most current recommendations; v. Reintegrate injured workers with a confirmed diagnosis of concussion, progressively back into work activities only once medical clearance has been obtained; and vi. Foster better lines of communication, and support for, injury management between: employees, employers, medical professionals and insurances. vii. Address the potentially serious mental health issues that may arise post-concussive injury. 10. Governments & Professional Regulatory Bodies: Should: a) Implement comprehensive public health strategies for the Canadian population to: i. Increase awareness that concussions can be sustained in accidents, sports, leisure and occupational contexts; ii. Inform head injuries should be taken seriously; and iii. Explain how and why concussions should be prevented and promptly assessed by a physician where they are suspected to have occurred. b) Define appropriate scopes of practice for all health professionals involved in the field of concussion detection, management, and treatment. c) Work with key stakeholders to develop compensation structures to support physicians to allocate the time necessary to: (1) conduct appropriate assessments to rule out concussions, (2) provide ongoing concussion management, and (3) develop detailed medical clearance plans. d) Work with key stakeholders to develop standardized educational tools for physicians to provide to patients with concussions. i. Ideally this would include contextualized tools for sports teams, schools, and employers. e) Adopt legislation or regulation for educational institutions and community-based sport associations to establish clear expectations/obligations regarding concussion awareness and management for youth in sports (e.g., Ontario’s Rowan’s law). i. To have meaningful impact, such initiatives must also be accompanied by: implementation funding to support the development and implementation of sport specific concussion management protocols; and monitoring/compliance programs. f) Establish a national concussion and sports injury surveillance system (with standardized metrics) to collect detailed head and sport injury related information. Thus, providing the ability to research such injuries in an ongoing and timely manner. g) Provide research opportunities/funding on concussions. Specific examples of research areas to prioritize include: i. Effective prevention strategies for both adults and children in a range of sport, leisure, or occupational environments; ii. The incidence and impact of concussions in children, and how to reduce their occurrence (inside and outside of sport); iii. Address knowledge gaps for concussion identification, management, and medical clearance for physicians not specialized in concussion care; iv. Explore all health professionals’ participation in concussion management providing for respective: competency, expertise, interdisciplinary collaboration, and appropriate roles; v. Evaluate how emerging point of care diagnostics and biomarker testing will be incorporated into sport, leisure and work environments; vi. Continued development of effective, user-friendly, and age appropriate management strategies/tools for physicians regarding concussion identification, management, and medical clearances; and vii. Develop a harmonized understanding of “concussion” and “mild traumatic brain injury” (MTBI) constructs/concepts, so that adults with concussion signs or symptoms, who do not meet the more restrictive MTBI criteria, are properly managed. McCrory P, Meeuwisse W, Dvorak J, et al. Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport - the 5th International Conference on Concussion in Sport Held in Berlin. Br J Sports Med 2017, 51: 838-847. Parachute Canada. Canadian Guideline on Concussion in Sport. 2017. Available: http://www.parachutecanada.org/injury-topics/item/canadian-guideline-on-concussion-in-sport (accessed 2018 Jul 31). Concussion in Sport Group. Concussion Recognition Tool 5. Br J Sports Med 2017 51: 872. Available: https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/bjsports/early/2017/04/26/bjsports-2017-097508CRT5.full.pdf (accessed 2018 July 31st). (accessed 2018 Jul 31). Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation. Guidelines for Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms. Health Care Professional Version. 3rd Ed, Adults (18 + years of age). Toronto: Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation; 2018. Available: http://braininjuryguidelines.org/concussion/fileadmin/media/adult-concussion-guidelines-3rd-edition.pdf (accessed 2018 Jul 31). Concussion in Sport Group. Sport Concussion Assessment Tool – 5th Ed. Br J Sports Med 2017, 0:1-8. Available: https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/bjsports/early/2017/04/26/bjsports-2017-097508CRT5.full.pdf (accessed 2018 July 31). Approved by the CMA Board of Directors March 2019
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