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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


91 records – page 1 of 10.

Promotion of healthy childhood

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy374
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC99-42
That the Canadian Medical Association promote both medical and social interventions to ensure an optimal start to life and a physically, mentally and socially healthy childhood.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC99-42
That the Canadian Medical Association promote both medical and social interventions to ensure an optimal start to life and a physically, mentally and socially healthy childhood.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association promote both medical and social interventions to ensure an optimal start to life and a physically, mentally and socially healthy childhood.
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Access by the elderly to medical and supportive health care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy377
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC99-78
That the Canadian Medical Association adopt as policy the following principle: Access in old age. Older citizens in all parts of Canada should have timely access to medical and supportive health care services that are clinically appropriate. This includes: a) rapid access to primary medical care, b) access to a full range of medical, surgical, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitative services, and c) access to specialized programs designed to address the physical and mental problems of old age. Access to clinically appropriate services should not be denied on the basis of age or disability.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC99-78
That the Canadian Medical Association adopt as policy the following principle: Access in old age. Older citizens in all parts of Canada should have timely access to medical and supportive health care services that are clinically appropriate. This includes: a) rapid access to primary medical care, b) access to a full range of medical, surgical, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitative services, and c) access to specialized programs designed to address the physical and mental problems of old age. Access to clinically appropriate services should not be denied on the basis of age or disability.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association adopt as policy the following principle: Access in old age. Older citizens in all parts of Canada should have timely access to medical and supportive health care services that are clinically appropriate. This includes: a) rapid access to primary medical care, b) access to a full range of medical, surgical, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitative services, and c) access to specialized programs designed to address the physical and mental problems of old age. Access to clinically appropriate services should not be denied on the basis of age or disability.
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Safety of genetically modified organisms

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy378
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC99-80
That the Canadian Medical Association ask Health Canada to ensure it obtains sound evidence of the safety of genetically modified organisms before they are authorized by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC99-80
That the Canadian Medical Association ask Health Canada to ensure it obtains sound evidence of the safety of genetically modified organisms before they are authorized by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association ask Health Canada to ensure it obtains sound evidence of the safety of genetically modified organisms before they are authorized by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
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Information program for Canadians on genetically modified organisms

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy379
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC99-81
That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal government to create an information program for Canadians on genetically modified organisms.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC99-81
That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal government to create an information program for Canadians on genetically modified organisms.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal government to create an information program for Canadians on genetically modified organisms.
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Regulations for genetically modified organisms

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy380
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC99-82
That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal government to act quickly to adopt regulations controlling the development, testing and commercialization of genetically modified organisms.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC99-82
That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal government to act quickly to adopt regulations controlling the development, testing and commercialization of genetically modified organisms.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal government to act quickly to adopt regulations controlling the development, testing and commercialization of genetically modified organisms.
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Evaluating international medical graduates competencies

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy455
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC99-29
That the Canadian Medical Association support efforts to evaluate the competencies of international medical graduates prior to licensure in Canada by applying equivalent evaluation standards to international medical graduates as those used for graduates of Canadian medical schools so that the safety of the public is assured.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC99-29
That the Canadian Medical Association support efforts to evaluate the competencies of international medical graduates prior to licensure in Canada by applying equivalent evaluation standards to international medical graduates as those used for graduates of Canadian medical schools so that the safety of the public is assured.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association support efforts to evaluate the competencies of international medical graduates prior to licensure in Canada by applying equivalent evaluation standards to international medical graduates as those used for graduates of Canadian medical schools so that the safety of the public is assured.
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Addressing professional issues of Canadian physicians and medical practice

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy465
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC99-60
That the Canadian Medical Association be the national focus for enhancing organized medicine's effectiveness in addressing the variety of professional issues facing Canadian physicians and medical practice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1999-08-25
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC99-60
That the Canadian Medical Association be the national focus for enhancing organized medicine's effectiveness in addressing the variety of professional issues facing Canadian physicians and medical practice.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association be the national focus for enhancing organized medicine's effectiveness in addressing the variety of professional issues facing Canadian physicians and medical practice.
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Proposed UN Convention on the rights of older persons

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13925
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2018-07-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2018-07-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
Dear Minister Freeland: We are a national consortium of experts who serve and advocate for the needs and rights of older people. We are delighted by the recent appointment of a new Minister of Seniors, and send our congratulations to the Honourable Filomena Tassi. We are also encouraged by our Government’s commitment to support the health and economic well-being of all Canadians, and heartened by your promise to listen to, and to be informed by feedback from Canadians. It is in this spirit that we are writing today regarding the need for Canada to provide support and leadership with a goal of developing and ratifying a United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Older Persons. In the context of massive global demographic shifts and an aging population, insightful and careful reflection by the leaders of our organizations has led to universal and strong support for the creation and implementation of a UN Convention to specifically recognize and protect the human rights of our older persons. A UN Convention on the Rights of Older Persons will:
enshrine their rights as equal with any other segment of the population with the same legal rights as any other human being;
categorically state that it is unacceptable to discriminate against older people throughout the world;
clarify the state’s role in the protection of older persons;
provide them with more visibility and recognition both nationally and internationally, which is vitally important given the rate at which Canadian and other societies are ageing;
advance the rights of older women at home and as a prominent factor in Canada’s foreign policy;
have a positive, real-world impact on the lives of older citizens who live in poverty, who are disproportionately older women, by battling ageism that contributes to poverty, ill-health, social isolation, and exclusion;
support the commitment to improve the lives of Indigenous Peoples; members of the LGBTQ community, and visible and religious minorities; and,
provide an opportunity for Canada to play a leadership role at the United Nations while at the same time giving expression to several of the Canadian government’s stated foreign policy goals. We have projected that the cost and impact of not having such a Convention would have a significant negative impact on both the physical and mental health of older Canadians. The profound and tragic consequence would have a domino effect in all domains of their lives including social determinants of health, incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases, social and psychological functioning, not to mention massive financial costs to society. There is recognition of this need internationally and ILC-Canada, along with other Canadian NGOs and organizations have been active at the UN to help raise awareness of the ways a UN Convention on the Rights of Older Persons would contribute to all countries. Changes have already been implemented by our Government that are consistent and aligned with a UN Convention, such as improving the income of vulnerable Canadian seniors, funding for long term care and support for community based dementia programs. These initiatives are all in keeping with support for a Convention on the Rights of Older Persons. They are also reflective of our country’s commitment to engage more fully with the United Nations and provide Canada the stage to demonstrate leadership on a vital international issue. It is an opportunity to champion the values of inclusive government, respect for diversity and human rights including the human rights of women. Scientific evidence demonstrates that human rights treaties help to drive positive change in the lives of vulnerable groups of people. In many countries in the world, older people are not adequately protected by existing human rights law, as explicit references to age are exceedingly rare. Even in countries like Canada, where there are legal frameworks that safeguard older people, a Convention would provide an extra layer of protection, particularly if the Convention has a comprehensive complaints mechanism. Older adults need to be viewed as a growing but underutilized human resource. By strengthening their active role in society including the workforce, they have tremendous capacity, knowledge, and wisdom to contribute to the economy and general well-being of humankind. We are requesting you meet with our representatives, to discuss the vital role of a UN Convention on the Rights of Older Persons and the role your government could play in improving the lives of older people in Canada and around the world. The fact that Canada is ageing is something to celebrate. We are all ageing, whether we are 20 or 85. This is a ”golden opportunity” to showcase Canada as a nation that will relentlessly pursue doing the “right thing” for humanity by supporting a UN Convention that ensures that our future is bright. Please accept our regards, and thank you for your attention to this request. We await your response. Sincerely, Margaret Gillis, President, International Longevity Centre Canada Dr. Kiran Rabheru, Chair of the Board, International Longevity Centre Canada Linda Garcia, Director, uOttawa LIFE Research Institute cc: The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau Prime Minister of Canada The Honourable Filomena Tassi Minister of Seniors The Honourable Jean Yves Duclos Minister for Families, Children and Social Development Ambassador Marc-Andre Blanchard Permanent Representative to Canada at the United Nations The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor Health Minister Margaret Gillis President International Longevity Centre Canada Dr. Kiran Rabheru Chair of the Board, International Longevity Centre Canada Linda Garcia, PhD Director LIFE Research Institute Dr. Laurent Marcoux President Canadian Medical Association Andrew Padmos, BA, MD, FRCPC, FACP Chief Executive Officer Dani Prud’Homme Directeur général FADOQ Peter Lukasiewicz Chief Executive Officer Gowling WLG Dr. Dallas Seitz, MD, FRCPC President, CAGP Dr. Frank Molnar President, Canadian Geriatrics Society Dr. David Conn Co-Leader Canadian Coalition for Senior’s Mental Health Claire Checkland Director - Canadian Coalition for Seniors’ Mental Health Joanne Charlebois Chief Executive Officer, Speech-Language & Audiology Canada Claire Betker President Canadian Nurses Association Janice Christianson-Wood, MSW, RSW Title/Organization: President, Canadian Association of Social Workers / Présidente, l’Association canadienne des travail- leurs sociaux François Couillard Chief Executive Officer/Chef de la direction Ondina Love, CAE Chief Executive Officer Canadian Dental Hygienists Association Jean-Guy Soulière President/Président National Association of Federal Retirees /Association nationale des retraités fédéraux Sarah Bercier Executive Director Laura Tamblyn Watts National Initiative for the Care of the Elderly Dr. Keri-Leigh Cassidy Founder Fountain of Health Dr. Beverley Cassidy Geriatric Psychiatris Seniors Mental Health Dalhousie University Dept of Psychiatry Jenny Neal and Janet Siddall CO Chairs, Leadership Team Grandmothers Advocacy Network (GRAN) Kelly Stone President and CEO Families Canada Dr. Becky Temple, MD, CCFP, CCPE President, CSPL Medical Director Northeast, Northern Health Medical Lead Privilege Dictionary Review, BCMQI J. Van Aerde, MD, MA, PhD, FRCPC Clinical Professor of Pediatrics - Universities of Alberta & British Columbia, Canada Associate Faculty - Leadership Studies - Royal Roads Univ, Victo- ria, BC, Canada Past-President - Canadian Society of Physician Leaders Editor-in-Chief / Canadian Journal of Physician Leadership Dr. Rollie Nichol, MD, MBA, CCFP, CCPE Vice-President, CSPL Associate Chief Medical Officer, Alberta Health Services Dr. Shannon Fraser, MSc, FRCSC, FACS Secretary / Treasurer, CSPL Chief General Surgery Jewish General Hospital Linda Gobessi MD FRCPC Medical Director Geriatric Psychiatry Community Services of Ottawa Ottawa Vickie Demers Executive Director / Directrice générale Services communautaires de géronto- psychiatrie d’ Ottawa Geriatric Psychiatry Community Services of Ottawa Ging-Yuek Robin Hsiung, MD MHSc FRCPC FACP FAAN Associate Professor Ralph Fisher and Alzheimer Society of BC Professor Director of Clinical Research Director of Fellowship in Behavioural Neurology UBC Hospital Clinic for Alzheimer and Related Disorders Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine University of British Columbia Adriana Shnall Senior Social Worker Baycrest Health Sciences Harinder Sandhu, D.D.S., Ph.D Professor and Past Director Schulich Dentistry & Vice Dean, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry Western University Dr. Christopher Frank, Chair of Geriatric Education and Recruitment Initiative Jennie Wells, MD Associate Professor, University of Western Ontario Department of Medicine Chair/Chief Division of Geriatric Medicine Parkwood Institute Laura Diachun, MD Program Director, Undergrad Geriatric Education University of Western Ontario Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine Parkwood Institute Sheri-Lynn Kane, MD Program Director Internal Medicine Dept of Medicine Education Office Victoria Hospital Niamh O’Regan, MB ChB, Assistant Professor, University of Western Ontario Parkwood Institute Michael Borrie, MB ChB, FRCPC Professor, University of Western Ontario Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine Parkwood Institute Jenny Thain, MRCP (Geriatrics) Assistant Professor, University of Western Ontario Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine Victoria Hospital Peter R. Butt MD CCFP FCFP Assoc. Professor, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan Mamta Gautam, MD, MBA, FRCPC, CCPE Dept of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa Psychiatrist, Psychosocial Oncology Program, The Ottawa Hospital President and CEO, PEAK MD Inc. Dr. Shabbir Amanullah Chair, ICPA Arun V. Ravindran, MBBS, MSc, PhD, FRCPC, FRCPsych Professor and Director, Global Mental Health and the Office of Fellowship Training, Department of Psychiatry, Graduate Faculty, Department of Psychology and Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto Sarah Thompson, MD, FRCPC Geriatric Psychiatrist Seniors’ Mental Health Team Addictions and Mental Health Program Louise Plouffe, Ph.D. Director of Research, ILC Canada (retired) Kimberley Wilson, PhD, MSW Assistant Professor, Adult Development & Aging, Department of Family Relations & Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph Andrew R. Frank M.D. B.Sc.H. F.R.C.P.(C) Cognitive and Behavioural Neurologist Medical Director, Bruyère Memory Program Bruyère Continuing Care Ottawa, Canada Diane Hawthorne Family Physician BSc, MD, CCFP, FCFP Dr. Ken Le Clair Prof Emeritus Queens University and. Lead Policy Physician Consultant to Ontario. Seniors Behavioral Support Initative Queens University
Documents
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Auditing Physician Billings

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1878
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
Auditing Physician Billings Purpose: The CMA has developed a set of guiding principles to assist in the formation and modification of provincial/territorial billing audit processes. These principles will ensure that billing audit systems are fair, transparent, effective and timely, and that they uphold their original objectives of ensuring the accountability of public expenditures and educating physicians on appropriate billing practices. Background: As payments to physicians are made through public monies, the integrity of the payment system is validated through physician billing audits and reviews. Audits and reviews are usually prompted by: billings that appear to be outside of the “norm,” patient complaints, physician complaints or a “focus” on a particular service/area of practice/group of physicians. Each province/territory is responsible for and has in place particular processes and procedures to review physician billings. Billing audits can be stressful events that, regardless of the audit outcome, have had adverse effects on a physician’s health and practice. Although changes over the years in billing audit practices have occurred, they have not addressed all of the physicians’ concerns. Inadequacies in the existing procedures, such as the lack of a clear decision-making process, established review timelines and options for recourse still remain. In response to this situation, many provinces/territories are reviewing and modifying their existing billing audit process. The CMA and Canada’s physicians believe in an open, accountable and transparent health care financing system. It is for this reason that the CMA has developed this set of principles related to the key components of the audit process to ensure it is fair, efficient, effective and serves the purpose it was originally intended – to ensure the accountability of public funds and to educate physicians on proper billing practices. Principles: Education on proper billing practices: The audit and review process must be undertaken as an educational exercise. In a fee based system, billing code use and interpretation are complex and can often lead to unintentional errors. If or when inconsistencies occur, the physician must be alerted and provided with the opportunity to explain his/her billing behaviour. To assist in moving the audit and review process from under a cloud of perceived punishment to that of educational enlightenment, the repayment of any funds shall not commence until the audit and review process is complete and all appeal options have been exercised. As part of this overall educational framework, it is recommended that all newly licensed physicians be offered an educational program on proper billing interpretations, procedures and practices, and of the audit process itself. Fair, Transparent and Timely Process: In order for the audit and review process to be perceived as fair, it must operate at arms length from governments and the Colleges. As a profession, physicians have been granted the privilege of self-regulation by society. Given that medicine is a highly complex art and science, physicians are the only group truly qualified to set and maintain standards and to uphold accountability in matters of professional behaviour. The billing audit and review process must observe the principles of “Natural Justice” in that the: audit findings must be both impartial and be seen to be impartial and physicians affected by the findings must be offered a fair hearing by being given notice in writing of the findings; the opportunity to respond to the findings; all of the information to prepare a response; sufficient time to prepare a response; and an oral hearing if there is a dispute on factual matters or if requested by the physician. Physicians should be informed that legal counsel and assistance can be retained at any stage of the audit and review process. Physicians should consult with their respective provincial/territorial division or the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA) to see whether such assistance is available, or with lawyers who specialize in this field. Specific time limits should be adhered to in the auditing and reviewing of a physician’s billings practice, particularly related to when the review period should commence and to the duration of the review period. For example, billings should not be reviewable more than 24 months after the service is rendered and the review period should not be greater than 12 months. These limitation periods recognize that physicians will not be able to recall, with certainty, the vast amount of information contained in a patient’s medical record over the past 10 years – the average length of time in which medical records must be held. It also ensures that audits and reviews are conducted in a timely fashion minimizing undue stress and hardship on the physician and, in light of the health human resources shortage, enabling them to re-focus their attention and energy on taking care of their patients. Informed Decision-Makers: Audits and reviews to determine whether there has been any incorrect or inaccurate billing should be undertaken solely by a physician’s peers, and where possible, consisting of physicians from the same specialty and subspecialty and with similar practice type, geography and demography. This peer review group shall consider age-gender distribution and the morbidity of the patients as well as other pertinent matters in arriving at its findings and conclusions. Outcomes: Any conclusions and/or findings from an audit and review must be prepared in a written report and forwarded, in a timely manner, to the physician and the paying agency. If either party is not satisfied with the findings, they have the option of launching an appeal. The preferred route would be to pursue and use Alternative Dispute Resolution processes since they tend to encourage a more co-operative climate resulting in fair and appropriate settlements, while avoiding the excessive financial, psychological and procedural costs that can be associated with formal court proceedings. Conclusion: These guiding principles are the product of an international, provincial and territorial scan of billing audit practices. They have undergone extensive consultation with the provincial/territorial medical associations and national medical organizations. They should be used to form the foundation of and to guide any reviews or modifications to existing provincial/territorial audit and review processes. CMA Policy, Medical Professionalism, 2002. Student Behaviour Guide_Natural.Justice.htm, Dec. 2002
Documents
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Physical activity

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1881
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
BD05-03-55
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
BD05-03-55
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
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91 records – page 1 of 10.