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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


15 records – page 1 of 2.

Aboriginal physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy53
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-66
That Canadian Medical Association work with others to develop a health human resource strategy aimed at improving: Recruitment, training, retention of Aboriginal physicians and other health care workers; Integrated, holistic primary care service delivery relevant to the needs of the Aboriginal community and under community control.
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-66
That Canadian Medical Association work with others to develop a health human resource strategy aimed at improving: Recruitment, training, retention of Aboriginal physicians and other health care workers; Integrated, holistic primary care service delivery relevant to the needs of the Aboriginal community and under community control.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association work with others to develop a health human resource strategy aimed at improving: Recruitment, training, retention of Aboriginal physicians and other health care workers; Integrated, holistic primary care service delivery relevant to the needs of the Aboriginal community and under community control.
Documents
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Compensating clinical physicians who teach

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy141
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC03-43
That Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates ask Canadian universities and governments to accurately document and appropriately compensate clinical physicians who are teaching, in recognition of their substantial contribution to the professional education of physicians in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC03-43
That Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates ask Canadian universities and governments to accurately document and appropriately compensate clinical physicians who are teaching, in recognition of their substantial contribution to the professional education of physicians in Canada.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates ask Canadian universities and governments to accurately document and appropriately compensate clinical physicians who are teaching, in recognition of their substantial contribution to the professional education of physicians in Canada.
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Joint statement on scopes of practice

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy219
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Health human resources
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Health human resources
Text
Joint Statement on Scopes of Practice (February 2003) Canada's physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other health professionals recognize that a sustainable health workforce is a key challenge facing our health care system. In this regard, scopes of practice is an important issue that needs to be addressed. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA), the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) and the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) have approved the following principles and criteria for the determination of scopes of practice. The primary purposes of such determinations are to meet the health care needs of Canadians, and to serve the interests of patients and the public safely, efficiently and competently. The CPhA, CNA and CMA believe that policy decisions taken in this area must put patients first. Secondly, they should be grounded in principles that reflect our commitment to professionalism, lifelong learning and patient safety. Thirdly, that there be recognition of the need for legislative and regulatory changes to support evolving scopes of practice. Moreover, we believe that health professionals must be involved in decision-making processes in this area. Principles Focus: Scopes of practice statements should promote safe, ethical, high-quality care that responds to the needs of patients and the public in a timely manner, is affordable and is provided by competent health care providers. Flexibility: A flexible approach is required that enables providers to practise to the extent of their education, training, skills, knowledge, experience, competence and judgment while being responsive to the needs of patients and the public. Collaboration and cooperation: In order to support interdisciplinary approaches to patient care and good health outcomes, physicians, nurses and pharmacists engage in collaborative and cooperative practice with other health care providers who are qualified and appropriately trained and who use, wherever possible, an evidence-based approach. Good communication is essential to collaboration and cooperation. Coordination: A qualified health care provider should coordinate individual patient care. Patient choice: Scopes of practice should take into account patients' choice of health care provider. Criteria Accountability: Scopes of practice should reflect the degree of accountability, responsibility and authority that the health care provider assumes for the outcome of his or her practice. Education: Scopes of practice should reflect the breadth, depth and relevance of the training and education of the health care provider. This includes consideration of the extent of the accredited or approved educational program(s), certification of the provider and maintenance of competency. Competencies and practice standards: Scopes of practice should reflect the degree of knowledge, values, attitudes and skills (i.e., clinical expertise and judgement, critical thinking, analysis, problem solving, decision making, leadership) of the provider group. Quality assurance and improvement: Scopes of practice should reflect measures of quality assurance and improvement that have been implemented for the protection of patients and the public. Risk assessment: Scopes of practice should take into consideration risk to patients. Evidence-based practices: Scopes of practice should reflect the degree to which the provider group practices are based on valid scientific evidence where available. Setting and culture: Scopes of practice should be sensitive to the place, context and culture in which the practice occurs. Legal liability and insurance: Scopes of practice should reflect case law and the legal liability assumed by the health care provider including mutual professional malpractice protection or liability insurance coverage. Regulation: Scopes of practice should reflect the legislative and regulatory authority, where applicable, of the health care provider. Principles and criteria to ensure safe, competent and ethical patient care should guide the development of scopes of practice of health care providers. This document is based on a January 2002 policy developed by the Canadian Medical Association whicb has been endorsed by the Canadian Nurses Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association. We welcome the support of other health care providers for these principles and criteria regarding scopes of practice.
Documents
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Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC02-67
That Canadian Medical Association support the concept that liability for individual practitioner actions in any collaborative care model must be clearly delineated and appropriately insured.
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC02-67
That Canadian Medical Association support the concept that liability for individual practitioner actions in any collaborative care model must be clearly delineated and appropriately insured.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association support the concept that liability for individual practitioner actions in any collaborative care model must be clearly delineated and appropriately insured.
Documents
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National locum licence

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy120
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-65
That Canadian Medical Association and the Divisions work with the Federation of Medical Licensing Authorities of Canada and the provincial/territorial licensing bodies to develop a national locum licence.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-65
That Canadian Medical Association and the Divisions work with the Federation of Medical Licensing Authorities of Canada and the provincial/territorial licensing bodies to develop a national locum licence.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association and the Divisions work with the Federation of Medical Licensing Authorities of Canada and the provincial/territorial licensing bodies to develop a national locum licence.
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Needs of retired physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy135
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-37
That Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with the divisions, address specific needs of retired physicians in the Canadian Medical Association's physician health and well-being program.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-37
That Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with the divisions, address specific needs of retired physicians in the Canadian Medical Association's physician health and well-being program.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with the divisions, address specific needs of retired physicians in the Canadian Medical Association's physician health and well-being program.
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Notes for an address by Dr. Peter Barrett, Past-President, Canadian Medical Association : Public hearings on primary care reform : Presentation to the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy2011
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2002-05-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2002-05-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Text
On behalf of the 53,000 physician members of the CMA, we appreciate the opportunity to offer our thoughts on the issue of primary care reform and the recommendations made recently in your April 2002 report. I am very pleased to be presenting today with my CMA colleague, Dr. Susan Hutchison, Chair of our GP Forum along with Dr. Elliot Halparin and Dr. Kenneth Sky from the Ontario Medical Association. Before I begin presenting the CMA’s recommendations, I believe it’s important to make a few points clear in regard to primary care: * First, is that Canada has one of the best primary care systems in the world. (Just ask Canadians, we have. Our 2001 Report Card showed that 60% of Canadians believe that we have one of the best health care systems in the world and gave high marks for both quality of service and system access). * Second, is that primary care reform is not the panacea for all that ails Medicare. * And finally, primary care and specialty care are inextricably linked. I like to expand a bit on the last point because I think it’s an important consideration. There is a tendency to separate medical care into two areas; primary care and specialty care. However, we need to recognize that medical and health care encompasses a broad spectrum of services ranging from primary prevention to highly specialized quaternary care. Primary care and specialty care are so critically interdependent that we need to adapt an integrated approach to patient care. Now, in respect to the CMA’s recommendations on implementing changes for the delivery of primary care, we believe that government must respect the following four policy premises: 1. All Canadians should have access to a family physician. 2. To ensure comprehensive and integrated care, family physicians should remain as the central provider and coordinator of timely access to publicly-funded medical services. 3. There is no single model that will meet the primary care needs of all communities in all regions of the country. 4. Scopes of practice should be determined in a manner that serves the interests of patients and the public safely, efficiently, and competently. Access to Family Physicians A successful renewal of primary health care delivery cannot be accomplished without addressing the shortage of family physicians and general practitioners. The effects of an aging practitioners population, changes in lifestyle and productivity, along with the declining popularity of this field as the career choice of medical school graduates are all having an impact on the supply of family physician. Physician as Central Coordinator While multistakeholder teams offer the potential for providing a broader array of services to meet patients’ health care needs, it is also clear that for most Canadians, having a family doctor as the central provider for all primary medical care services is a core value. As the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) indicated in its submission to the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada, research shows that over 90% of Canadians seek advice from a family physician as their first resource in the health care system. The CFPC also noted that a recent Ontario College of Family Physicians Decima public opinion survey found that 94% agree that it is important to have a family physician who provides the majority of care and co-ordinates the care delivered by others. i A family physician as the central coordinator of medical services ensures efficient and effective use of system resources as it allows for only one entry point into the health care system. This facilitates a continuity of care, as the family physician generally has developed an ongoing relationship with his or her patients and as a result is able to direct the patient through the system such that the patient receives the appropriate care from the appropriate provider. No Single Model for Reform In recent years, several government task force and commission reports, including the report of this Committee, have called for primary care reform. Common themes that have emerged include; 24/7 coverage; alternatives to fee-for-service payment of physicians; nurse practitioners and health promotion and disease prevention. Governments across the country have launched pilot projects of various models of primary care delivery. It is critical that these projects are evaluated before they are adopted on a grander scale. Moreover, we must take into account the range of geographical settings across the country, from isolated rural communities to the highly urbanized communities with advanced medical science centres. Scopes of Practice There is a prevailing myth that physicians are a barrier to change when in fact the progressive changes in the health care system have been more often than not physician lead. Canadian physicians are willing to work in teams and the CMA has developed a “Scopes of Practice” policy that clearly supports a collaborative and cooperative approach. A policy that has been supported in principle by the Canadian Nurses Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association. Because of the growing complexity of care, the exponential growth of knowledge, and an increased emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention, primary care delivery will increasingly rely on multi-stakeholder teams. This is a positive development. However, expanding the primary care team to include nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, and others, while desirable, will cost the system more, not less. Therefore, we need to change our way of thinking about primary care reform. We need to think of it as an investment. We need to think of it not in terms of cost savings but as a cost-effective way to meet the emerging unmet needs of Canadians. Conclusion To conclude, there is no question that primary care delivery needs to evolve to ensure it continues to meet the needs of Canadians. But we see this as making a good system better, not fundamental reform. Thank you. i College of Family Physicians of Canada. Shaping The Future of Health Care: Submission to the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada. Ottawa: CFPC; Oct 25, 2001.
Documents
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Physician mental health and wellness

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy37
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-50
That Canadian Medical Association promote awareness of physician mental health and wellness issues and reduction of the stigma associated with the need to seek personal assistance for these issues
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-50
That Canadian Medical Association promote awareness of physician mental health and wellness issues and reduction of the stigma associated with the need to seek personal assistance for these issues
Text
That Canadian Medical Association promote awareness of physician mental health and wellness issues and reduction of the stigma associated with the need to seek personal assistance for these issues
Documents
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Physicians and health policy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy82
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-117
That Canadian Medical Association, divisions and affiliates urge governments to meet regularly with physicians in leadership roles and other health professionals when developing implementation plans for the recommendations of federal, provincial and territorial commission and task force reports pertaining to health policy.
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-117
That Canadian Medical Association, divisions and affiliates urge governments to meet regularly with physicians in leadership roles and other health professionals when developing implementation plans for the recommendations of federal, provincial and territorial commission and task force reports pertaining to health policy.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association, divisions and affiliates urge governments to meet regularly with physicians in leadership roles and other health professionals when developing implementation plans for the recommendations of federal, provincial and territorial commission and task force reports pertaining to health policy.
Documents
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Physician stress and burnout

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy123
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-68
That Canadian Medical Association work with divisions, affiliates and other stakeholders, through the Canadian Medical Association Centre for Physician Health and Well-Being, to address issues of physician stress and burn-out.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-68
That Canadian Medical Association work with divisions, affiliates and other stakeholders, through the Canadian Medical Association Centre for Physician Health and Well-Being, to address issues of physician stress and burn-out.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association work with divisions, affiliates and other stakeholders, through the Canadian Medical Association Centre for Physician Health and Well-Being, to address issues of physician stress and burn-out.
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15 records – page 1 of 2.