Results

22 records – page 1 of 3.

Aboriginal health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy811

Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC90-95
That the Canadian Medical Association take action to support aboriginal peoples in those areas of social, political and economic life that would improve the health of their communities.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC90-95
That the Canadian Medical Association take action to support aboriginal peoples in those areas of social, political and economic life that would improve the health of their communities.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association take action to support aboriginal peoples in those areas of social, political and economic life that would improve the health of their communities.
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Aboriginal health care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy809

Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC90-93
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage physicians to expand contacts with their local aboriginal communities, on both a community and professional level, in order to address aboriginal health care issues.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC90-93
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage physicians to expand contacts with their local aboriginal communities, on both a community and professional level, in order to address aboriginal health care issues.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage physicians to expand contacts with their local aboriginal communities, on both a community and professional level, in order to address aboriginal health care issues.
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Canada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy694

Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-12-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD97-03-118
That the Canadian Medical Association continue its discussions with the Federal Government to influence Provincial Governments to comply with the lawful provisions of Sections 11 and 12 of the Canada Health Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-12-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD97-03-118
That the Canadian Medical Association continue its discussions with the Federal Government to influence Provincial Governments to comply with the lawful provisions of Sections 11 and 12 of the Canada Health Act.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association continue its discussions with the Federal Government to influence Provincial Governments to comply with the lawful provisions of Sections 11 and 12 of the Canada Health Act.
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Clinical faculty

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1896

Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC05-76
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon the federal/provincial/territorial governments, in conjunction with practicing physicians, to immediately develop a joint comprehensive plan with practicing physicians for recruiting, retaining, and adequately compensating clinical faculty.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC05-76
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon the federal/provincial/territorial governments, in conjunction with practicing physicians, to immediately develop a joint comprehensive plan with practicing physicians for recruiting, retaining, and adequately compensating clinical faculty.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon the federal/provincial/territorial governments, in conjunction with practicing physicians, to immediately develop a joint comprehensive plan with practicing physicians for recruiting, retaining, and adequately compensating clinical faculty.
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Code of environmental health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy731

Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-05-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD90-05-177
That the Canadian Medical Association develop a code of environmental health that would serve as a benchmark to judge all Canadian Medical Association activities, both internal and external.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-05-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD90-05-177
That the Canadian Medical Association develop a code of environmental health that would serve as a benchmark to judge all Canadian Medical Association activities, both internal and external.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association develop a code of environmental health that would serve as a benchmark to judge all Canadian Medical Association activities, both internal and external.
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Definition of women's health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy771

Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-202
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the following definition of women's health and use it to guide the association's work in this area: Women's health involves women's emotional, social, cultural, spiritual and physical well-being, and it is determined by the social, political and economic context of women's lives as well as by biology.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-202
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the following definition of women's health and use it to guide the association's work in this area: Women's health involves women's emotional, social, cultural, spiritual and physical well-being, and it is determined by the social, political and economic context of women's lives as well as by biology.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the following definition of women's health and use it to guide the association's work in this area: Women's health involves women's emotional, social, cultural, spiritual and physical well-being, and it is determined by the social, political and economic context of women's lives as well as by biology.
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Guiding principles for negotiations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy691

Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-196
That the Canadian Medical Association, in consultation with its Divisions, develop a set of guiding principles for negotiations, applicable for use by all Divisions, thereby introducing a consistency and national authority in the approach to negotiations by the Divisions.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-196
That the Canadian Medical Association, in consultation with its Divisions, develop a set of guiding principles for negotiations, applicable for use by all Divisions, thereby introducing a consistency and national authority in the approach to negotiations by the Divisions.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association, in consultation with its Divisions, develop a set of guiding principles for negotiations, applicable for use by all Divisions, thereby introducing a consistency and national authority in the approach to negotiations by the Divisions.
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Heart disease and cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy723

Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC90-101
That the Canadian Medical Association and its members support and encourage public education programs that promote healthy lifestyles, the recognition of warning symptoms and signs of heart disease, and the acquisition of manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills, recognizing that these skills are most effective when combined with a pre-hospital advanced life support system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC90-101
That the Canadian Medical Association and its members support and encourage public education programs that promote healthy lifestyles, the recognition of warning symptoms and signs of heart disease, and the acquisition of manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills, recognizing that these skills are most effective when combined with a pre-hospital advanced life support system.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association and its members support and encourage public education programs that promote healthy lifestyles, the recognition of warning symptoms and signs of heart disease, and the acquisition of manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills, recognizing that these skills are most effective when combined with a pre-hospital advanced life support system.
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Industry support for university research programs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy515

Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-05-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD90-05-215
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage industries to make significant commitments to basic research programs in Canadian universities.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
1990-05-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD90-05-215
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage industries to make significant commitments to basic research programs in Canadian universities.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage industries to make significant commitments to basic research programs in Canadian universities.
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Letter to the International Joint Commission on the 2004 Progress Report addressing air quality

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1952

Last Reviewed
2012-03-03
Date
2005-02-11
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2012-03-03
Date
2005-02-11
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
On behalf of Canada’s physicians, the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) would like to take this opportunity to provide comments to the International Joint Commission on the 2004 Progress Report addressing air quality. The Association, first founded in 1867, currently represents more than 59,000 physicians across the country. Our mission includes advocating for the highest standard of health and care for all Canadians and we are committed to activities that will result in healthy public policy which support health and the environment. The environment, as a determinant of health, is a major concern for the general public as well as health care providers. Air pollution affects the health of all Canadians, but particularly children, the elderly and those with respiratory and cardiac conditions. Poor air quality can provoke devastating health effects. Every day physicians come face to face with the reality of an unhealthy environment and its effects on our patients. The impact can be seen in terms of increased frequency of symptoms, medication use, physician visits, emergency room visits, hospitalizations and premature deaths. Canadians and Americans breathe the same air, drink the same water, and share a common responsibility to provide future generations with a healthy environment. This is why the Canada-U.S. agreement to address and resolve environmental issues is so important. The U.S.-Canada Air Quality Agreement established a formal and flexible method of addressing trans-boundary air pollution and laid the groundwork for cooperation between the United States and Canada on very important air quality issues. Under the Air Quality Agreement of 1991, both countries have made progress in coordinating and implementing their acid rain control programs and have focused activities on ground level ozone since 2000. The improvements, as described in the 2004 Progress Report are commendable. But while many of the parties’ emission reduction commitments are on-track, dangerous air pollution continues to blow both ways across our borders. This suggests that the measures included in this agreement are not sufficient to ensure that Canadians have clean air to breathe. In fact, we believe that future evaluations should describe air quality improvement as the outcome of interest, in addition to cataloguing emission reduction initiatives, as is done in the 2004 Progress Report. The 2004 Progress Report, prepared by Environment Canada and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, is the seventh biennial report compiled under the 1991 United States-Canada Air Quality Agreement. Ground level ozone, a primary component of smog, directly contributes to air quality and health. The commitment to reduce ground level ozone under the 2000 Agreement has the potential to improve air quality and the quality of life of literally millions of people. As indicated in the Progress Report 2004, Canada is “on track to implement all of its commitments for vehicles, engines and fuels” in order to reduce ground level ozone. However, the stationary emissions of NOx remain above target levels. An aggressive strategy to reduce NOx and VOC to lessen smog, and the adverse health impact on Canadians and Americans is urgently required. Smog and climate change are not distinct problems. In fact, a large proportion of the smog pollutants that cause serious cardiac and respiratory problems in Canada are emitted from the same tailpipes and industrial smokestacks as the greenhouse gases, which the Kyoto agreement aims to reduce. Canada’s commitment to the Kyoto Accord provides an opportunity to significantly reduce smog and achieve cleaner air for all Canadians to breathe. The purchasing of emission credits from foreign countries to make up for a shortfall in the reductions of greenhouse-gas emissions Canada agreed to in the Kyoto accord is clearly short-term thinking that does not address the long term goals outlined in the accord. Climate change measures under the Accord will yield additional benefits through improved local and regional air quality. But more can and needs to be done. Canada must bring air pollution down to safe levels and to cut greenhouse gas emissions to halt climate change. For these reasons, CMA recommended that the Prime Minister commit to choosing a climate change strategy that satisfies Canada’s international commitments while maximizing the clean air co-benefits and smog–reduction potential of any greenhouse gas reduction initiatives. Canada’s physicians are concerned about the pollutants that are affecting the health of Canadians, and believe that there should be appropriate mechanisms to warn those who are vulnerable and at risk, so that they can act to protect themselves from contaminants in the air, water, or food. We have called on the government of Canada to establish a national Air Quality Index so that real-time air quality information and predictive forecasting is made available to all Canadians. Health-based reporting about pollutants is a way to allow Canadians to partner in their own health protection, while such pollutants are being addressed by policies aimed at producing cleaner air. Environment Canada and Health Canada have long been developing a health-based Air Quality Index, which would incorporate the most recent health science and make air quality forecasts and current ambient conditions available across the nation. We contend this is a key initiative and we urge this work be expedited. CMA reaffirms our support for the Kyoto protocol and in the best interest of Canadians, urges the government to establish a national Air Quality Index. There is a fundamental role for governments in preventing and controlling smog and poor air quality through healthy public policy and regulations. There remains much work to be done. CMA’s vision of a healthy population for Canada underpins our commitment to advocate for clean air. I would like to thank you and the IJC for your continued commitment to improving air quality for Canadians and Americans. It is through efforts like this, that our mutual goal for a clean, healthy and safe environment may be realized. We look forward to your next report demonstrating even further gains in achieving high air quality. Yours truly, Albert J. Schumacher, MD President AJS/jns

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22 records – page 1 of 3.