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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


111 records – page 1 of 12.

Advancing safety as a component of quality improvement in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10568
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2012-05-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD12-06-156
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the white paper Advancing safety as a component of quality improvement in Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 12-132.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2012-05-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD12-06-156
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the white paper Advancing safety as a component of quality improvement in Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 12-132.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the white paper Advancing safety as a component of quality improvement in Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 12-132.
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Advocating for health system improvement

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10492
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-40
The Canadian Medical Association insists that physicians be protected from intimidation when engaging in health and health care system related advocacy.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-40
The Canadian Medical Association insists that physicians be protected from intimidation when engaging in health and health care system related advocacy.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association insists that physicians be protected from intimidation when engaging in health and health care system related advocacy.
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Antibiotics in animals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10534
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC12-114
The Canadian Medical Association supports regulations to severely limit the use of medically important antibiotics on animals being raised for human consumption.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC12-114
The Canadian Medical Association supports regulations to severely limit the use of medically important antibiotics on animals being raised for human consumption.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports regulations to severely limit the use of medically important antibiotics on animals being raised for human consumption.
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Antibiotics used in the raising of farm animals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10211
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC11-88
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that a prescription from a veterinarian be required for all antibiotics used in the raising of farm animals or for any other agricultural purpose.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC11-88
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that a prescription from a veterinarian be required for all antibiotics used in the raising of farm animals or for any other agricultural purpose.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that a prescription from a veterinarian be required for all antibiotics used in the raising of farm animals or for any other agricultural purpose.
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Best practices in physician leadership

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10468
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-43
The Canadian Medical Association will facilitate knowledge transfer of best practices in physician leadership and engagement across the country.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-43
The Canadian Medical Association will facilitate knowledge transfer of best practices in physician leadership and engagement across the country.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will facilitate knowledge transfer of best practices in physician leadership and engagement across the country.
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Call to Action: The Need for a National Pain Strategy for Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10595
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-16
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD13-01-11
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) endorses the document entitled Call to Action: The Need for a National Pain Strategy for Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 13-10.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-16
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD13-01-11
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) endorses the document entitled Call to Action: The Need for a National Pain Strategy for Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 13-10.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) endorses the document entitled Call to Action: The Need for a National Pain Strategy for Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 13-10.
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Canadian Disclosure Guidelines: Being Open with Patients and Families

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10367
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-12-03
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health information and e-health
Resolution
BD12-03-66
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s document Canadian Disclosure Guidelines: Being Open with Patients and Families as outlined in Appendix A to BD 12-61.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-12-03
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health information and e-health
Resolution
BD12-03-66
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s document Canadian Disclosure Guidelines: Being Open with Patients and Families as outlined in Appendix A to BD 12-61.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s document Canadian Disclosure Guidelines: Being Open with Patients and Families as outlined in Appendix A to BD 12-61.
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Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-81
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-81
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
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Change in the economic climate

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10520
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC12-99
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national strategy to assist communities in the development and implementation of comprehensive health plans to address short- or long-term adverse effects associated with a sudden change in the economic climate.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC12-99
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national strategy to assist communities in the development and implementation of comprehensive health plans to address short- or long-term adverse effects associated with a sudden change in the economic climate.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national strategy to assist communities in the development and implementation of comprehensive health plans to address short- or long-term adverse effects associated with a sudden change in the economic climate.
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Chronic Diseases Related to Aging: CMA's Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10226
Date
2011-10-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2011-10-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association wishes to commend the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health for undertaking this study of the issue of chronic diseases related to aging. It is a timely issue, since the first members of the Baby Boom generation turned 65 in 2011 and it's predicted that by 2031 a quarter of Canada's population will be 65 or older. Though chronic disease is not exclusive to seniors, its prevalence does rise with age: according to Statistics Canada, about 74% of Canadians over 65 have at least one chronic condition such as diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis or depression and nearly 25% have three or more. The proportion is higher among people 85 years old and over. What are the causes of chronic disease? There are many. Some of them are rooted in unhealthy behaviour: smoking, poor nutrition and, in particular, lack of physical activity. Physicians are concerned about rising obesity rates in Canada, for example, because obesity increases one's risk of developing chronic diseases later in life. But there is more to chronic disease than unhealthy behaviour. It is also affected by a person's biological and genetic makeup, as well as by his or her social environment. Lower income and educational levels, poor housing, and social isolation, which is a greater problem for seniors than for other populations, are all associated with poorer health status. Now the good news: chronic disease is not an inevitable consequence of aging. We can delay the onset of chronic disease, and perhaps even reduce the risk that it will occur. Patients who do have existing chronic disease, their conditions can often be controlled successfully through appropriate health care and disease management, so that they can continue to lead active, independent lives. Thus the CMA supports initiatives promoting healthy aging - which the Public Health Agency of Canada defines as "the process of optimizing opportunities for physical, mental and social health as people age." Healthy lifestyles should be encouraged at any age. For example, the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines, which CMA supports, recommend that people 65 or older accumulate at least two-and-a-half hours per week of aerobic activity such as walking, swimming or cycling. Experts believe that healthy aging will compress a person's period of illness and disability into a short period just prior to death, enabling a longer period of healthy, independent and fulfilling life. For those who are already affected with chronic diseases, treatment is long term and can be very complex. People with diabetes, for example, need a continuous ongoing program to monitor their blood sugar levels and maintain them at an appropriate level; people with arthritis or other mobility problems may require regular physical therapy. For the patient, chronic disease means a long-term management that is much more complicated than taking antibiotics for an infection. People with two or more chronic conditions may be consulting a different specialist for each, as well as seeking support from nurse counsellors, dieticians, pharmacists, occupational therapists, social workers or other health professionals. Often, management requires medication. The majority of Canadians over 65 take at least one prescription drug, and nearly 15% are on five drugs or more, which increases the possibility that, for example, two of those drugs could interact negatively with each other to produce unpleasant and possibly serious side effects. Long-term, complex chronic disease care is in fact the new paradigm in our health care system. About 80% of the care now provided in the United States is for chronic diseases, and there is no reason to believe Canada is greatly different. Hence, it is worth considering what form, ideally, a comprehensive program of chronic disease management should take, for patients of any age. The CMA believes it should include the following four elements: * First, access to a primary care provider who has responsibility for the overall care of the patient. For more than 30 million Canadians, that primary care provider is a family physician. Family physicians who have established long-standing professional relationships with their patients, can better understand their needs and preferences. They can build a relationship of trust, so that patients are comfortable in discussing frankly how they want to treat their conditions: for example, whether to take medication for depression or seek counselling with a therapist. The family physician can also serve as a co-ordinator of the care delivered by other providers. This leads to our second recommended element: * Collaborative and coordinated care. The CMA believes that, given the number of providers who may be involved in the care of chronic diseases, the health care system should encourage the creation of interdisciplinary teams or, at minimum, enable a high level of communication and coordination among individual providers. We believe all governments should support: o Interdisciplinary primary care practices, such as Family Health Networks in Ontario, which bring a variety of different health professionals and their expertise into one practice setting; o Widespread use of the electronic health record, which can facilitate information sharing and communication among providers; and o A smooth process for referral: for example, from family physician to specialists, or from family physician to physiotherapist. The CMA is working with other medical stakeholders to create a referral process tool kit that governments, health care organizations and practitioners can use to support the development of more effective and efficient referral systems. The patient may also need non-medical support services to help cope with disability related to chronic disease. For example, a person with arthritis who wants to remain at home may need to have grab bars, ramps or stair lifts installed there. Ideally, a coordinated system of chronic disease management would also include referral to those who could provide these services. * The third necessary element is support for informal caregivers. These are the unsung heroes of elder care. An estimated four million Canadians are providing informal, unpaid care to family members or friends. About a quarter of these caregivers are themselves 65 or older. Their burden can be a heavy one, in terms of both time and expense. Stress and isolation are common among caregivers. The federal government has taken steps to provide much-needed support to informal caregivers. The most recent federal budget, for example, increased the amount of its Caregiver Tax Credit. We recommend that the government build on these actions, to provide a solid network of support, financial and otherwise, to informal caregivers. * The fourth and final element is improving access to necessary services. Only physician and hospital services are covered through the Canada Health Act, and many other services are not. All provinces have pharmacare programs for people over 65, but coverage varies widely between provinces and many, particularly those with lower incomes, find it difficult to pay for their necessary medications. Seniors who do not have post-retirement benefit plans - and these are the majority - also need to pay out of pocket for dental care, physiotherapy, mental health care and other needed supports. We recommend that all levels of government explore adjusting the basket of services provided through public funding, to make sure that it reflects the needs of the growing number of Canadians burdened by chronic disease. In particular, we recommend that the federal government negotiate a cost-shared program of comprehensive prescription drug coverage with provincial/territorial governments. In conclusion, the CMA believes the committee is wise to consider how we might reduce the impact - on individual patients, the health care system and society - of chronic disease related to aging. Chronic disease management is a complex problem, but warrants close attention as it is now the dominant form of health care in Canada. We look forward to the results of the Committee's deliberations.
Documents
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111 records – page 1 of 12.