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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


5 records – page 1 of 1.

Standing Committee on Health’s study on violence faced by healthcare workers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14052
Date
2019-05-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2019-05-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
Re: Standing Committee on Health’s study on violence faced by healthcare workers Dear Mr. Casey: I am writing on behalf of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) to submit recommendations for consideration by the Standing Committee on Health (the Committee) as part of the study on violence faced by healthcare workers. The CMA is deeply concerned with the state of workplace safety in all health care settings, including hospitals, long-term care, and home care settings. As in all experiences of violence, it is unacceptable for healthcare workers to be victims of violence in the provision of care to patients. While there is limited data nationally to understand the incidence of violence against healthcare workers, anecdotal evidence suggests that these experiences are increasing in frequency and severity. A 2010 survey of members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada shockingly found that, in the previous month, nearly one-third of respondents had been exposed to some form of aggressive behaviour from a patient (90%) or patient’s family (70%). The study concluded that “Canadian family physicians in active practice are subjected to regular abuse from their patients or family members of their patients.”1 These concerns were brought to the CMA’s General Council in 2015, where our members passed a resolution calling for: “the federal government to amend the Criminal Code by making it a specific criminal offence to assault health care providers performing their duties.” The CMA is prioritizing initiatives that support physician health and wellness. Increasingly, there is a recognition of the role of the workplace, primarily health care settings, and safe working conditions as having an important influence of physician health and wellness. …/2 1 Miedema BB, Hamilton R, Tatemichi S et al. Monthly incidence rates of abusive encounters for Canadian family physicians by patients and their families. Int J Family Med. 2010; 2010: 387202. Available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275928/pdf/IJFM2010-387202.pdf (accessed 2019 May 9). Mr. Bill Casey Addressing violence against providers in healthcare settings will require action from both federal and provincial/territorial governments. In light of the above, the CMA respectfully submits the following recommendations for consideration by the Committee in its study on violence against healthcare workers: 1) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support the call to amend the Criminal Code of Canada to introduce a new criminal offence for assault against a healthcare provider performing their duty. 2) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support establishing monitoring of violence against healthcare workers, that is consistent across jurisdictions, and have an active role in responding appropriately to trends. 3) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support federal leadership in a pan- Canadian approach to support workplace safety in healthcare settings, including collaborating with the provinces and territories to improve violence prevention. Finally, the CMA welcomes and supports the petition recently tabled in the House of Commons by Dr. Doug Eyolfson, calling for the Minister of Health “to develop a pan-Canadian prevention strategy to address growing incidents of violence against health care workers.” In closing, the CMA is encouraged that the Committee is undertaking this study. I look forward to the Committee’s report on this topic and the opportunity to collaborate on federal and provincial/territorial action in this matter. Sincerely, F. Gigi Osler, BScMed, MD, FRCSC President c.c.: Marilyn Gladu, M.P., Vice Chair, Standing Committee on Health Don Davies, M.P., Vice Chair Standing Committee on Health
Documents
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Continuing medical education in obstetrical care for family physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy561
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1986-08-12
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC86-83
It is recommended that university continuing medical education departments develop programs designed to continue the education of family physicians in the delivery of obstetrical care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1986-08-12
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC86-83
It is recommended that university continuing medical education departments develop programs designed to continue the education of family physicians in the delivery of obstetrical care.
Text
It is recommended that university continuing medical education departments develop programs designed to continue the education of family physicians in the delivery of obstetrical care.
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Physician manpower

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy702
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC77-2
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC77-2
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
Text
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
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Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC75-7
That this Canadian Medical Association statement on eye care be approved. 1. The medical profession in general and ophthalmologists in particular have a responsibility to provide leadership in developing plans for effective, efficient and realistic eye care in Canadians. 2. The principle that the provision of eye care includes both medical and non-medical personnel is recognized and accepted. Any such personnel should be organized and administered to ensure adherence to all of the following specific principles: a) provision of quality eye care includes both medical (including surgical) and non-medical acts, b) only duly qualified and legally licensed physicians must be allowed to provide the medical aspects of eye care, c) duly qualified and legally licensed physicians must also be free to provide complete eye care, d) the duly qualified and legally licensed physician must be free to delegate appropriate eye care acts at his discretion to persons acting under his control and his responsibility, e) non-medical personnel should be free to perform independently only non-medical eye care acts: and they should perform independently only those acts that they are legally authorized to perform independently, and f) guidelines for referral between non- medical and medical personnel are essential. 3. Within the broad limits set by the above, many patterns are possible. However, in order to be effective, efficient and realistic, any eye care plan or plans that are developed should meet the following criteria: a) every citizen should have reasonable access to the eye care system through duly qualified and legally licensed medical or non-medical personnel of his choice in his own population-area, b) every citizen should have reasonable access to treatment of ocular disease by duly qualified and legally licensed medical personnel either by direct personal appointment, or by referral from other primary eye care personnel, c) treatment for especially complicated cases should be available to every citizen upon referral from medical personnel to specialized medical personnel in one or more adequately equipped centres in each province or region, d) programs designed for the promotion of eye health should be provided in every population-area. These should include prevention and early detection of eye disease and injury, and may be provided through programs and services that serve general needs or special needs such as: i) pre-school needs ii) school needs iii) industrial and occupational and recreational needs iv) specific survey (e.g., glaucoma) needs v) special purpose (e.g., driving and sports) needs vi) geriatric needs vii) ocular rehabilitation needs e) training institutions must be equipped and staffed to prepare graduates appropriately for their assigned roles in eye care term, f) optical appliances should be available in every population area, and other ocular prostheses should be within reasonable access- all at reasonable cost, g) methods of financing should provide for the maximum quality eye care for every one at the lowest possible cost to the government and to the private citizen, h) eye research programs should be appropriately staffed and funded, and i) the organizational structure of eye care services should establish and maintain lines of control and responsibility that are consistent with the principles and criteria enunciated above.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC75-7
That this Canadian Medical Association statement on eye care be approved. 1. The medical profession in general and ophthalmologists in particular have a responsibility to provide leadership in developing plans for effective, efficient and realistic eye care in Canadians. 2. The principle that the provision of eye care includes both medical and non-medical personnel is recognized and accepted. Any such personnel should be organized and administered to ensure adherence to all of the following specific principles: a) provision of quality eye care includes both medical (including surgical) and non-medical acts, b) only duly qualified and legally licensed physicians must be allowed to provide the medical aspects of eye care, c) duly qualified and legally licensed physicians must also be free to provide complete eye care, d) the duly qualified and legally licensed physician must be free to delegate appropriate eye care acts at his discretion to persons acting under his control and his responsibility, e) non-medical personnel should be free to perform independently only non-medical eye care acts: and they should perform independently only those acts that they are legally authorized to perform independently, and f) guidelines for referral between non- medical and medical personnel are essential. 3. Within the broad limits set by the above, many patterns are possible. However, in order to be effective, efficient and realistic, any eye care plan or plans that are developed should meet the following criteria: a) every citizen should have reasonable access to the eye care system through duly qualified and legally licensed medical or non-medical personnel of his choice in his own population-area, b) every citizen should have reasonable access to treatment of ocular disease by duly qualified and legally licensed medical personnel either by direct personal appointment, or by referral from other primary eye care personnel, c) treatment for especially complicated cases should be available to every citizen upon referral from medical personnel to specialized medical personnel in one or more adequately equipped centres in each province or region, d) programs designed for the promotion of eye health should be provided in every population-area. These should include prevention and early detection of eye disease and injury, and may be provided through programs and services that serve general needs or special needs such as: i) pre-school needs ii) school needs iii) industrial and occupational and recreational needs iv) specific survey (e.g., glaucoma) needs v) special purpose (e.g., driving and sports) needs vi) geriatric needs vii) ocular rehabilitation needs e) training institutions must be equipped and staffed to prepare graduates appropriately for their assigned roles in eye care term, f) optical appliances should be available in every population area, and other ocular prostheses should be within reasonable access- all at reasonable cost, g) methods of financing should provide for the maximum quality eye care for every one at the lowest possible cost to the government and to the private citizen, h) eye research programs should be appropriately staffed and funded, and i) the organizational structure of eye care services should establish and maintain lines of control and responsibility that are consistent with the principles and criteria enunciated above.
Text
That this Canadian Medical Association statement on eye care be approved. 1. The medical profession in general and ophthalmologists in particular have a responsibility to provide leadership in developing plans for effective, efficient and realistic eye care in Canadians. 2. The principle that the provision of eye care includes both medical and non-medical personnel is recognized and accepted. Any such personnel should be organized and administered to ensure adherence to all of the following specific principles: a) provision of quality eye care includes both medical (including surgical) and non-medical acts, b) only duly qualified and legally licensed physicians must be allowed to provide the medical aspects of eye care, c) duly qualified and legally licensed physicians must also be free to provide complete eye care, d) the duly qualified and legally licensed physician must be free to delegate appropriate eye care acts at his discretion to persons acting under his control and his responsibility, e) non-medical personnel should be free to perform independently only non-medical eye care acts: and they should perform independently only those acts that they are legally authorized to perform independently, and f) guidelines for referral between non- medical and medical personnel are essential. 3. Within the broad limits set by the above, many patterns are possible. However, in order to be effective, efficient and realistic, any eye care plan or plans that are developed should meet the following criteria: a) every citizen should have reasonable access to the eye care system through duly qualified and legally licensed medical or non-medical personnel of his choice in his own population-area, b) every citizen should have reasonable access to treatment of ocular disease by duly qualified and legally licensed medical personnel either by direct personal appointment, or by referral from other primary eye care personnel, c) treatment for especially complicated cases should be available to every citizen upon referral from medical personnel to specialized medical personnel in one or more adequately equipped centres in each province or region, d) programs designed for the promotion of eye health should be provided in every population-area. These should include prevention and early detection of eye disease and injury, and may be provided through programs and services that serve general needs or special needs such as: i) pre-school needs ii) school needs iii) industrial and occupational and recreational needs iv) specific survey (e.g., glaucoma) needs v) special purpose (e.g., driving and sports) needs vi) geriatric needs vii) ocular rehabilitation needs e) training institutions must be equipped and staffed to prepare graduates appropriately for their assigned roles in eye care term, f) optical appliances should be available in every population area, and other ocular prostheses should be within reasonable access- all at reasonable cost, g) methods of financing should provide for the maximum quality eye care for every one at the lowest possible cost to the government and to the private citizen, h) eye research programs should be appropriately staffed and funded, and i) the organizational structure of eye care services should establish and maintain lines of control and responsibility that are consistent with the principles and criteria enunciated above.
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Ambulance services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy786
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC75-21
The Canadian Medical Association, recognizing the vital role of ambulance services in providing mobile life support for the acutely ill and injured, recommends that i) ambulance services be considered, where practicable, a direct extension of a hospital emergency department and integrated with the emergency services, ii) ambulance services incorporate standards of personnel education, vehicular design and life support equipment commensurate with those of the overall emergency care system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC75-21
The Canadian Medical Association, recognizing the vital role of ambulance services in providing mobile life support for the acutely ill and injured, recommends that i) ambulance services be considered, where practicable, a direct extension of a hospital emergency department and integrated with the emergency services, ii) ambulance services incorporate standards of personnel education, vehicular design and life support equipment commensurate with those of the overall emergency care system.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, recognizing the vital role of ambulance services in providing mobile life support for the acutely ill and injured, recommends that i) ambulance services be considered, where practicable, a direct extension of a hospital emergency department and integrated with the emergency services, ii) ambulance services incorporate standards of personnel education, vehicular design and life support equipment commensurate with those of the overall emergency care system.
Less detail