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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


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Auditing Physician Billings

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1878
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
Auditing Physician Billings Purpose: The CMA has developed a set of guiding principles to assist in the formation and modification of provincial/territorial billing audit processes. These principles will ensure that billing audit systems are fair, transparent, effective and timely, and that they uphold their original objectives of ensuring the accountability of public expenditures and educating physicians on appropriate billing practices. Background: As payments to physicians are made through public monies, the integrity of the payment system is validated through physician billing audits and reviews. Audits and reviews are usually prompted by: billings that appear to be outside of the “norm,” patient complaints, physician complaints or a “focus” on a particular service/area of practice/group of physicians. Each province/territory is responsible for and has in place particular processes and procedures to review physician billings. Billing audits can be stressful events that, regardless of the audit outcome, have had adverse effects on a physician’s health and practice. Although changes over the years in billing audit practices have occurred, they have not addressed all of the physicians’ concerns. Inadequacies in the existing procedures, such as the lack of a clear decision-making process, established review timelines and options for recourse still remain. In response to this situation, many provinces/territories are reviewing and modifying their existing billing audit process. The CMA and Canada’s physicians believe in an open, accountable and transparent health care financing system. It is for this reason that the CMA has developed this set of principles related to the key components of the audit process to ensure it is fair, efficient, effective and serves the purpose it was originally intended – to ensure the accountability of public funds and to educate physicians on proper billing practices. Principles: Education on proper billing practices: The audit and review process must be undertaken as an educational exercise. In a fee based system, billing code use and interpretation are complex and can often lead to unintentional errors. If or when inconsistencies occur, the physician must be alerted and provided with the opportunity to explain his/her billing behaviour. To assist in moving the audit and review process from under a cloud of perceived punishment to that of educational enlightenment, the repayment of any funds shall not commence until the audit and review process is complete and all appeal options have been exercised. As part of this overall educational framework, it is recommended that all newly licensed physicians be offered an educational program on proper billing interpretations, procedures and practices, and of the audit process itself. Fair, Transparent and Timely Process: In order for the audit and review process to be perceived as fair, it must operate at arms length from governments and the Colleges. As a profession, physicians have been granted the privilege of self-regulation by society. Given that medicine is a highly complex art and science, physicians are the only group truly qualified to set and maintain standards and to uphold accountability in matters of professional behaviour. The billing audit and review process must observe the principles of “Natural Justice” in that the: audit findings must be both impartial and be seen to be impartial and physicians affected by the findings must be offered a fair hearing by being given notice in writing of the findings; the opportunity to respond to the findings; all of the information to prepare a response; sufficient time to prepare a response; and an oral hearing if there is a dispute on factual matters or if requested by the physician. Physicians should be informed that legal counsel and assistance can be retained at any stage of the audit and review process. Physicians should consult with their respective provincial/territorial division or the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA) to see whether such assistance is available, or with lawyers who specialize in this field. Specific time limits should be adhered to in the auditing and reviewing of a physician’s billings practice, particularly related to when the review period should commence and to the duration of the review period. For example, billings should not be reviewable more than 24 months after the service is rendered and the review period should not be greater than 12 months. These limitation periods recognize that physicians will not be able to recall, with certainty, the vast amount of information contained in a patient’s medical record over the past 10 years – the average length of time in which medical records must be held. It also ensures that audits and reviews are conducted in a timely fashion minimizing undue stress and hardship on the physician and, in light of the health human resources shortage, enabling them to re-focus their attention and energy on taking care of their patients. Informed Decision-Makers: Audits and reviews to determine whether there has been any incorrect or inaccurate billing should be undertaken solely by a physician’s peers, and where possible, consisting of physicians from the same specialty and subspecialty and with similar practice type, geography and demography. This peer review group shall consider age-gender distribution and the morbidity of the patients as well as other pertinent matters in arriving at its findings and conclusions. Outcomes: Any conclusions and/or findings from an audit and review must be prepared in a written report and forwarded, in a timely manner, to the physician and the paying agency. If either party is not satisfied with the findings, they have the option of launching an appeal. The preferred route would be to pursue and use Alternative Dispute Resolution processes since they tend to encourage a more co-operative climate resulting in fair and appropriate settlements, while avoiding the excessive financial, psychological and procedural costs that can be associated with formal court proceedings. Conclusion: These guiding principles are the product of an international, provincial and territorial scan of billing audit practices. They have undergone extensive consultation with the provincial/territorial medical associations and national medical organizations. They should be used to form the foundation of and to guide any reviews or modifications to existing provincial/territorial audit and review processes. CMA Policy, Medical Professionalism, 2002. Student Behaviour Guide_Natural.Justice.htm, Dec. 2002
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Physical activity

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1881
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
BD05-03-55
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
BD05-03-55
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
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Obesity and cardiovascular disease (Update 2004): (Applicable to Canadians aged 20-60 years)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1246
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2004-05-31
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2004-05-31
Replaces
Obesity and cardiovascular disease (2003): (Applicable to Canadians aged 20-60 years)
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease (Update 2004) (Applicable to Canadians aged 20-60 years) Official Position: Obesity is a chronic condition that is multi-factorial in origin, complex to treat, and is a major contributor to heart disease, type II diabetes, hypertension, stroke and some cancers. Due to the magnitude of the impact that obesity has on heart disease and stroke, and to the clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are often found in the obese patient, obesity is recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The impact of obesity points to the importance of prevention through healthy behaviours including increased physical activity and a healthy nutritional diet beginning early in life, and continuing through all stages of life. Solutions require comprehensive approaches that are both education and environment based, and that target and assist individuals, the family, and communities to engage in healthy lifestyle patterns and behaviours. Solutions also require ongoing research to develop and evaluate comprehensive approaches to obesity prevention, management and treatment, and surveillance data that measures and tracks obesity and its impact in Canada. Obesity Defined The World Health Organization defines obesity as a condition of excessive body fat accumulation to an extent that health may be compromised. Measuring Obesity Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely accepted parameter used to distinguish between obese and non-obese adults aged 20 to 60 years and thus provides information about the subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease. BMI is calculated by dividing the weight (in kilograms) by the square of the height (in metres). BMI = weight (in kilograms) height (in metres) * height (in metres) A BMI equal to or greater than 30 kg/m2 is classified as obese, while a BMI in the range of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 is classified as overweight. Waist circumference (WC) provides an independent prediction of health risks over and above BMI. Increased waist (abdominal) circumference is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, type II diabetes and hypertension. As waist circumference increases above 102 cm for men and 88 cm for women, the risks of health-related illnesses increase. Populations at Increased Risk Obese individuals with diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemias or who are physically inactive are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to individuals without these conditions. A BMI between 25 and 29.9 kg/m2 (overweight) is associated with elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Weight gain during young adult life may be one of the most important determinants of future development of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease. Adults who gain weight have increased risk of coronary heart disease compared to those with stable weight. Weight gain during adult life may contribute to future development of ischemic heart disease regardless of initial body weight (obese or non-obese). Canadians of Aboriginal, Chinese, and South Asian (from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka) descent have higher rates of obesity-related chronic diseases (for example diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease). Individuals with lower socio-economic status have higher rates of obesity than those with higher socio-economic status. Promotion of Healthy Weights In April 2002, the Public Health Approaches to the Prevention of Obesity (PHAPO) Working Group of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) identified that a comprehensive approach to obesity prevention should: Address both dietary habits and physical activity patterns of the population Address both societal and individual level factors Address both immediate and distant causes Have multiple focal points and levels of intervention (i.e. at national, regional, community and individual levels); Include both policies and programs; and Build links between sectors that may otherwise be viewed as independent. Required Research Research is needed to: Develop a standard definition and a standard measurement technique for determining obesity in children. Develop obesity measures for older, ethnic and gender specific populations. Identify and develop effective primary prevention methods for individuals, families and communities to reduce the prevalence of obesity in all stages of life. Improve awareness and knowledge about the health effects of obesity and healthy living. Develop effective primary prevention measures and strategies that are therapeutic, secondary and tertiary in nature. Identify and track rates of obesity and overweight in Canada. Assess the effectiveness of obesity prevention and treatment initiatives. Identify and implement the most effective primary prevention strategies for ethnic populations. Develop and implement effective healthy public policy for the prevention, treatment, and management of obesity. Further, the surveillance of obese and overweight Canadians is necessary in order to assess the effectiveness of prevention and treatment initiatives. It is only through the combined action and resources of governments, non-governmental organizations, non-profit and private sectors to develop and implement a comprehensive approach to curb the growing trend of obesity in Canada.
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Letter to the Honourable Pierre Pettigrew on mandatory retirement

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11701
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-03-24
Topics
Health human resources
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-03-24
Topics
Health human resources
Text
Dear Minister: On behalf of the Canadian Medical Association, I am writing to highlight the concerns of our members regarding the issue of mandatory retirement for physicians practicing medicine in Canada. The sustained interest in this subject follows as a result of a resolution adopted by the CMA General Council on August 20, 2003. This resolution reads "that CMA, its divisions and affiliates advocate for the enactment of regulations and/or legislation that will prevent mandatory retirement of physicians based on age." Your predecessor, the Honourable Anne McLellan, requested further information from the CMA with regard to the aforementioned legislation, for the purposes of further discussion with provincial counterparts. Currently, rules governing mandatory retirement of physicians are complex and vary across jurisdictions. Nationally, the Canadian Human Rights Act governs mandatory retirement only insofar as physicians are considered employees of a federally regulated sector. The Act states that mandatory retirement is not discriminatory when a person has "reached the normal age of retirement for employees performing similar types of work." Provincially/territorially, human rights legislation varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In general, employers are not allowed to discriminate on the basis of age, although some provinces and territories only protect employees to the age of 65. Most physicians however, operate as self-employed business persons, billing provincial Medicare plans on a fee-for-service basis, according to tariffs agreed upon by provincial medical associations. This means that human rights legislation does not protect most physicians. Therefore, while physicians are still free to practice medicine after they reach the age of 65 (i.e. contract to provide medical care to patients, and bill the provincial insurer for insured services), renewal of their admitting privileges depends on the policies or regulations of individual hospitals. In light of the evidence supporting an existing shortage of physicians, federal and provincial/territorial decision makers should be acutely aware of the detrimental effect mandatory retirement has with regard to health human resource planning initiatives. Currently, 10.7% of practising Canadian physicians are over the age of 65. Many of these physicians practice quite actively. In 2003, a CMA survey indicated that physicians over 65 reported working on average 46 hours per week, excluding on-call responsibilities. To remove this experienced cohort of practitioners from the practice setting would be to further exacerbate the growing medical professional shortage. It is shortsighted to uphold restrictions on the practice of medicine by physicians, solely on the basis of age. Continuing professional development for practicing physicians throughout their medical careers is mandated by both the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada as a requirement of maintenance of certification. In a system which self-regulates based on competency, barriers to practice that are age-based are both unnecessary and discriminatory. The CMA respectfully requests you to follow the lead of your predecessor and raise the issue of mandatory retirement with your provincial/territorial counterparts. There should be no disparity nation wide; age-based barriers to practicing medicine should not be tolerated for physician employees or independent contractors alike. In some cases, federal, provincial and territorial human rights legislation may need to be amended. Equally as important, these concerns must be factored into discussions around health human resource planning. Thank you for your time and interest in this very important matter. We look forward with anticipation to your response. For your information, a more detailed account of mandatory retirement follows in the addendum to this letter. Should you have any further questions, I would be pleased to discuss this issue in further detail with you and your staff. Sincerely, Dr. Sunil Patel President, Canadian Medical Association cc: Presidents, Provincial / Territorial Medical Associations BACKGROUNDER: MANDATORY RETIREMENT Preface: Since its introduction in 1884 by German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, the age of 65 has become firmly entrenched as "retirement age". Mandatory retirement can be considered a form of discrimination or bias, insofar as scientific data does not support the principle of retirement on the basis of attainment of a specific chronological age. While human rights legislation governs the mandatory age of retirement for employees (including some physicians) with variations from province to province, the extent to which provincial human rights legislation applies to the mandatory retirement of physicians varies, depending on whether the physician is an employee of the hospital or an independent contractor. Legislative and regulatory framework: Human Rights Legislation vis-à-vis Mandatory Retirement Federal and provincial/territorial human rights legislation govern mandatory retirement for physician employees, depending on whether their employers are under federal or provincial jurisdiction. As most health institutions are under provincial jurisdiction, the vast majority of physician employees are protected by provincial human rights legislation. Each province and territory has enacted human rights legislation that governs in their respective areas of jurisdiction. The legislation tends to be analogous from one province to the next, but there are differences worth noting. Mandatory retirement constitutes a discriminatory measure for employers under the jurisdiction of seven provinces and territories. Four provinces do not consider mandatory retirement to be discrimination if the employee is 65 years or older. In two provinces, if mandatory retirement is provided for in a retirement or pension plan, it does not amount to discrimination. Jurisdiction Provisions governing mandatory retirement age Canada Mandatory retirement is not a discriminatory practice when a person has reached the normal retirement age for employees performing the same type of work. Consequently, in that case, the Act allows for mandatory retirement. Alberta Mandatory retirement constitutes a discriminatory measure for employers under the jurisdiction of this province. British Columbia Older employees are protected until the age of 65 against discrimination based on age. Consequently, employees aged 65 or over cannot file a complaint if they are obliged to retire for that reason. Manitoba Mandatory retirement constitutes a discriminatory measure for employers under the jurisdiction of this province. New Brunswick Termination of employment provided for in a retirement or pension plan does not constitute a discriminatory measure. In the absence of such a plan, however, employees who are obliged to retire may file a complaint for discrimination based on age, under the legislation on human rights. Newfoundland and Labrador Termination of employment provided for in a retirement or pension plan does not constitute a discriminatory measure. In the absence of such a plan, however, employees who are obliged to retire may file a complaint for discrimination based on age. They may use this recourse until the age of 65. Jurisdiction Provisions governing mandatory retirement age Northwest Territories Mandatory retirement constitutes a discriminatory measure for employers under the jurisdiction of this territory. Nova Scotia Mandatory retirement at age 65 does not constitute a discriminatory measure if it is standard in the workplace in question. However, the Human Rights Commission of this province investigates when an employee aged 65 or over is not treated in the same manner as others of the same age where retirement is concerned. Nunavut Mandatory retirement constitutes a discriminatory measure for employers under the jurisdiction of this territory. Ontario Older employees are protected against age-based discrimination up to the age of 65. Consequently, employees aged 65 or over cannot file a complaint if they are obliged to retire for this reason. Prince Edward Island Mandatory retirement constitutes a discriminatory measure for employers under the jurisdiction of this province. Quebec Mandatory retirement constitutes a form of discrimination according to the Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms and, more explicitly, is forbidden by the Act Respecting Labour Standards. Saskatchewan Older employees are protected against age-based discrimination up to the age of 65. Consequently, employees aged 65 or over cannot file a complaint if they are obliged to retire for this reason. Yukon Mandatory retirement constitutes a discriminatory measure for employers under the jurisdiction of this territory. Employment Status of Practicing Physicians Most physicians operate as independent contractors, billing provincial Medicare plans on a fee-for-service basis. Human rights legislation therefore does not protect the majority of physicians because the application of the legislation is limited to certain specific relationships, such as the traditional employment relationship. In other words, since physicians are more likely to be engaged by their patients to provide care than by the hospitals in which they provide it, the relationship between physicians and hospitals is more similar to a service contract than to a traditional employment contract. As a result, physicians who are independent contractors are free to practice medicine after they reach the age of 65. Depending on the hospital specific regulatory framework however, physicians may or may not be allowed to maintain their admitting privileges. Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons Regulatory bodies that license physicians do not place any restrictions on physician practice based solely on age. The Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons are not involved in administering hospital admitting privileges. None of the provincial or territorial colleges restrict licenses to practice medicine on the basis of a physician's age. Physicians who are employed in a traditional employment or master/servant relationship are covered by applicable human rights legislation, depending on whether their employers are federally or provincially/ territorially regulated. This means that some physicians can be forced into retirement at the age of 65, while others cannot. Policy Considerations: The Changing Physician Workforce Mandatory age-based retirement for health care workers has been a contested policy for almost 25 years. The issue assumes significant value for the CMA membership. Most physicians, operating as independent contractors, are not protected by human rights legislation in terms of retirement. Hospital admitting privileges are administered by the individual institutions, and renewal of such privileges may be subject to hospital policies on mandatory retirement. As more and more physicians choose to work in a traditional employment situation, the lack of human rights protection for physicians in private practice will be thrown in sharp relief. Health Human Resources Labour shortages challenge arguments for mandatory retirement. The health sector in particular has been hit hard by human resource shortages, which are predicted to increase as the baby-boom generation begins to retire in 2012. According to a study released by the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP), challenges associated with the aging workforce in Canada will require greater flexibility, by way of removing barriers to labour force participation among individuals nearing retirement.1 Physician Health and Wellbeing For many people, employment provides a fundamental sense of dignity and self-worth. Practicing medicine promotes independence, security, self-esteem and a sense of participation in the community. Involuntary termination of employment can cause psychological and emotional distress. Physician malaise is a burgeoning concern and its address has become a strategic priority for the Canadian Medical Association. Protection of physicians, be they employees or independent contractors, from mandatory retirement is a strategy which would see one dimension of physician anxiety diminished and would therefore be supported by the CMA. Mandatory retirement can have a particularly serious financial impact on physicians. Employer pension plans are often not available in employment relationships which feature part-time or provisional employees. In order to secure or maintain their standard of living upon retirement, physicians must save extensively via RRSPs or private pension plans. Those physicians with family members to support, such as young adults in post secondary education, children with disabilities, or older family members fear that they will not be able to do so if forced to leave the practice of medicine. Liability Issues While the threat of malpractice may present as one logical argument in support of a mandatory retirement age, the statistics do not support such a claim. The Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA) maintains that there is no significant correlation between physicians' physical age and the corresponding number of lawsuits. Dr. Norman Brown of the CMPA notes that of the over 500 new lawsuits a year, there is not a significant number involving elderly physicians. Conclusion: The public interest is best served by ensuring that all competent physicians, regardless of age, are able to practice medicine. Artificial barriers to practice based on age are simply discriminatory and counter productive in an era of health human resource shortages. 1 Merette, Marcel. (2003) "The Bright Side: A Positive View on the Economics of Aging." Institute for Research on Public Policy. Nov 18/03.
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Physician manpower

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy702
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC77-2
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC77-2
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
Text
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
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Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC77-27
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage programs to promote fluoridation of communal water supplies.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC77-27
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage programs to promote fluoridation of communal water supplies.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage programs to promote fluoridation of communal water supplies.
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Protective systems for passengers in motor vehicles

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy794
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1980-09-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC80-27
That the Canadian Medical Association strongly support continued research by industry and government in the design of protective systems for passengers in motor vehicles.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1980-09-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC80-27
That the Canadian Medical Association strongly support continued research by industry and government in the design of protective systems for passengers in motor vehicles.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association strongly support continued research by industry and government in the design of protective systems for passengers in motor vehicles.
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Canada Health Access Fund

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1490
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-10
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal and provincial/territorial governments to establish a Canada Health Access Fund to assure that individual Canadians can obtain portable and timely access to care at the time and to the extent of their needs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-10
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal and provincial/territorial governments to establish a Canada Health Access Fund to assure that individual Canadians can obtain portable and timely access to care at the time and to the extent of their needs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal and provincial/territorial governments to establish a Canada Health Access Fund to assure that individual Canadians can obtain portable and timely access to care at the time and to the extent of their needs.
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Wait time protocols and benchmarks

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1491
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-11
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure that practising physicians are involved in the development of wait time protocols and benchmarks that are based on the available evidence, that are administratively straightforward and that are satisfactory to the needs of patients and physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-11
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure that practising physicians are involved in the development of wait time protocols and benchmarks that are based on the available evidence, that are administratively straightforward and that are satisfactory to the needs of patients and physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure that practising physicians are involved in the development of wait time protocols and benchmarks that are based on the available evidence, that are administratively straightforward and that are satisfactory to the needs of patients and physicians.
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Increasing the number of family physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1494
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-21
The Canadian Medical Association calls on federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together to expand the number of comprehensive family physicians across Canada through the combined approach of training, recruitment and retention initiatives that are incentive based and developed with the input of actively practicing physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-21
The Canadian Medical Association calls on federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together to expand the number of comprehensive family physicians across Canada through the combined approach of training, recruitment and retention initiatives that are incentive based and developed with the input of actively practicing physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together to expand the number of comprehensive family physicians across Canada through the combined approach of training, recruitment and retention initiatives that are incentive based and developed with the input of actively practicing physicians.
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Interest-free postponement of student loan debt during residency

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1497
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC04-24
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with the Canadian Federation of Medical Students, the Canadian Association of Internes and Residents, the Fédération des étudiants en médecine du Québec and the Fédération des médecins résidents du Québec, advocates the federal government to modify relevant federal law in order to postpone federal student loan debt repayment while maintaining interest-free loan status until the completion of the residency period.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC04-24
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with the Canadian Federation of Medical Students, the Canadian Association of Internes and Residents, the Fédération des étudiants en médecine du Québec and the Fédération des médecins résidents du Québec, advocates the federal government to modify relevant federal law in order to postpone federal student loan debt repayment while maintaining interest-free loan status until the completion of the residency period.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with the Canadian Federation of Medical Students, the Canadian Association of Internes and Residents, the Fédération des étudiants en médecine du Québec and the Fédération des médecins résidents du Québec, advocates the federal government to modify relevant federal law in order to postpone federal student loan debt repayment while maintaining interest-free loan status until the completion of the residency period.
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Family physicians and hospital affiliation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1502
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-36
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-36
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
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Compensation for remote consultation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1505
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-41
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any type of remote consultation such as telemedicine and teleconsultation is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-41
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any type of remote consultation such as telemedicine and teleconsultation is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any type of remote consultation such as telemedicine and teleconsultation is a medical act to be duly compensated.
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Payment for discussions of patient health with other health professionals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1508
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-44
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-44
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
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Physician health and well-being

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1512
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the educational needs of physician leaders with respect to physician health and well-being through the creation of professional development opportunities and programs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the educational needs of physician leaders with respect to physician health and well-being through the creation of professional development opportunities and programs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the educational needs of physician leaders with respect to physician health and well-being through the creation of professional development opportunities and programs.
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Combined fertilizer / pesticides

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1514
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC04-50
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to rescind the registration of combined fertilizer/pesticides.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC04-50
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to rescind the registration of combined fertilizer/pesticides.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to rescind the registration of combined fertilizer/pesticides.
Less detail

Federal cash transfers for health care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1515
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-82
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government, in the context of the upcoming First Ministers' Meeting, to commit to a Health Partnership Guarantee to ensure federal cash transfers for health care will never again fall below a minimum threshold of 25% of provincial and territorial health care costs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-82
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government, in the context of the upcoming First Ministers' Meeting, to commit to a Health Partnership Guarantee to ensure federal cash transfers for health care will never again fall below a minimum threshold of 25% of provincial and territorial health care costs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government, in the context of the upcoming First Ministers' Meeting, to commit to a Health Partnership Guarantee to ensure federal cash transfers for health care will never again fall below a minimum threshold of 25% of provincial and territorial health care costs.
Less detail

Role of physicians in private delivery of publicly funded medical services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1516
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-83
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon federal, provincial and territorial governments to respect the role and the independence of physicians in their private delivery of publicly funded medical services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-83
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon federal, provincial and territorial governments to respect the role and the independence of physicians in their private delivery of publicly funded medical services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon federal, provincial and territorial governments to respect the role and the independence of physicians in their private delivery of publicly funded medical services.
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Annual report on the status of Canada's health care system and its funding

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1517
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-84
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure the development of an annual report on the status of Canada's health care system, including a component on the financial sustainability of the publicly funded medicare program.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-84
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure the development of an annual report on the status of Canada's health care system, including a component on the financial sustainability of the publicly funded medicare program.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure the development of an annual report on the status of Canada's health care system, including a component on the financial sustainability of the publicly funded medicare program.
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Adoption and implementation of sustainable funding framework for medicare

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1518
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-85
The Canadian Medical Association advocates for the adoption and implementation of a sustainable funding framework for medicare based on the policy objectives set out in the Canada Health Access Fund.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-85
The Canadian Medical Association advocates for the adoption and implementation of a sustainable funding framework for medicare based on the policy objectives set out in the Canada Health Access Fund.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association advocates for the adoption and implementation of a sustainable funding framework for medicare based on the policy objectives set out in the Canada Health Access Fund.
Less detail

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