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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


51 records – page 1 of 3.

Medication use and seniors (Update 2017)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10151
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2011-05-28
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2011-05-28
Replaces
Medication use and seniors
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
Older Canadians represent the fastest-growing segment of our population and are the largest users of prescription drugs. Seniors take more drugs than younger Canadians because, on average, they have a higher number of chronic conditions. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, in 2012, nearly two-thirds of seniors had claims for 5 or more drug classes, and more than one-quarter of seniors had claims for 10 or more drug classes. The number of drugs used by seniors increased with age. The use of multiple medications, or polypharmacy, is of concern in the senior population. The risk of drug interactions and adverse drug reactions is several-fold higher for seniors than for younger people. This phenomenon is associated with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics factors in seniors, including changes in renal and hepatic function, increased sensitivity to drugs and, potentially, multiple medical problems. In older persons, adverse drug reactions are often complex and may be the direct cause of hospital admissions for acute care. Cognitive and affective disorders, for example, may be due to adverse reactions to sedatives or hypnotic drugs. Chronic pain is a common issue, and it is important to carry out research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults. The CMA supports the development of a coordinated national approach to reduce polypharmacy and prevent adverse drug reactions. Prescribers must be vigilant to optimize pharmacotherapy and in reconciling medications, taking into consideration physiological changes as a person ages. Deprescribing should be considered, reducing or stopping medications that may be harmful or no longer be of benefit, seeking to improve quality of life. There has been considerable interest in determining which factors affect prescribing behavior and how best to influence these factors. Strategies that improve prescribing practices include evidence-based drug information provided through academic detailing; objective continuing medical education; accessible, user-friendly decision support tools available at point of care; and electronic prescribing systems that allow physicians access to their patient's treatment and medication profiles. The following principles define the basic steps to appropriate prescribing for seniors.
Know the patient.
Know the diagnosis.
Know the drug history. Keep a medication list for each patient and review, update, reconcile and evaluate adherence at each visit. Instruct the patient to bring all prescription and over-the-counter medications, including medications prescribed by other physicians, and natural health products, to each appointment. In some provinces, pharmacists conduct medication use reviews for patients on public drug benefit programs.
Know the history of use of other substances such as alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, opioids and caffeine.
Consider non-pharmacologic therapy, including diet, exercise, psychotherapy or community resources. Continuing medical education in specific non-pharmacologic therapies is valuable. For example, evaluation and management of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia should be considered before anti-psychotic therapy. As well, Canadian standardized non-pharmacologic order sets should be developed for the treatment of delirium.
Know the drugs. Critically evaluate all sources of drug information and use multiple sources such as clinical practice guidelines, medical journals and databases, continuing medical education and regional drug information centres. Monitor patients continually for adverse drug reactions. Appropriate drug dosage depends on factors such as age, sex, body size, general health, concurrent illnesses and medications, and hepatic, renal and cognitive function (for example, older people are particularly sensitive to drugs that affect the central nervous system).
Keep drug regimens simple. Avoid mixed-frequency schedules when possible. Try to keep the number of drugs used for long-term therapy under five to minimize the chance of drug interactions and improve adherence.
Establish treatment goals. Determine how the achievement of goals will be assessed. Regularly re-evaluate goals, adequacy of response and justification for continuing therapy. Time to benefit of prescribed medications should be a key consideration when providing care to seniors at end of life.
Encourage patients to be responsible medication users. Verify that the patient and, if necessary, the caregiver, understands the methods and need for medication. Recommend the use of daily or weekly medication containers, calendars, diaries or other reminders, as appropriate, and monitor regularly for compliance. Encourage the use of one dispensary. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada has developed a program, Knowledge is the best medicine (https://www.knowledgeisthebestmedicine.org), that can be helpful to seniors and their healthcare team manage medicines safely and appropriately. Approved by the Board on May 28, 2011 Update approved by the Board on March 02, 2019
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Principles for providing information about prescription drugs to consumers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy189
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
Principles For Providing Information About Prescription Drugs To Consumers Approved by the CMA Board of Directors, March 2003 Since the late 1990's expenditures on direct to consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs in the United States have increased many-fold. Though U.S.-style DTCA is not legal in Canada1, it reaches Canadians through cross-border transmission of print and broadcast media, and through the Internet. It is believed to have affected drug sales and patient behaviour in Canada. Other therapeutic products, such as vaccines and diagnostic tests, are also being marketed directly to the public. Proponents of DTCA argue that they are providing consumers with much-needed information on drugs and the conditions they treat. Others argue that the underlying intent of such advertising is to increase revenue or market share, and that it therefore cannot be interpreted as unbiased information. The CMA believes that consumers have a right to accurate information on prescription medications and other therapeutic interventions, to enable them to make informed decisions about their own health. This information is especially necessary as more and more Canadians live with chronic conditions, and as we anticipate the availability of new products that may accompany the "biological revolution", e.g. gene therapies. The CMA recommends a review of current mechanisms, including mass media communications, for providing this information to the public. CMA believes that consumer information on prescription drugs should be provided according to the following principles. 2 Principle #1: The Goal is Good Health The ultimate measure of the effectiveness of consumer drug information should be its impact on the health and well-being of Canadians and the quality of health care. Principle #2: Ready Access Canadians should have ready access to credible, high-quality information about prescription drugs. The primary purpose of this information should be education; sales of drugs must not be a concern to the originator. Principle #3: Patient Involvement Consumer drug information should help Canadians make informed decisions regarding management of their health, and facilitate informed discussion with their physicians and other health professionals. CMA encourages Canadians to become educated about their own health and health care, and to appraise health information critically. Principle #4: Evidence-Based Content Consumer drug information should be evidence based, using generally accepted prescribing guidelines as a source where available. Principle #5: Appropriate Information Consumer drug information should be based as much as possible on drug classes and use of generic names; if discussing brand-name drugs the discussion should not be limited to a single specific brand, and brand names should always be preceded by generic names. It should provide information on the following: * indications for use of the drug * contraindications * side effects * relative cost. In addition, consumer drug information should discuss the drug in the context of overall management of the condition for which it is indicated (for example, information about other therapies, lifestyle management and coping strategies). Principle #6: Objectivity of Information Sources Consumer drug information should be provided in such a way as to minimize the impact of vested commercial interests on the information content. Possible sources include health care providers, or independent research agencies. Pharmaceutical manufacturers and patient or consumer groups can be valuable partners in this process but must not be the sole providers of information. Federal and provincial/territorial governments should provide appropriate sustaining support for the development and maintenance of up-to-date consumer drug information. Principle #7: Endorsement/ Accreditation Consumer drug information should be endorsed or accredited by a reputable and unbiased body. Information that is provided to the public through mass media channels should be pre-cleared by an independent board. Principle #8: Monitoring and Revision Consumer drug information should be continually monitored to ensure that it correctly reflects current evidence, and updated when research findings dictate. Principle #9: Physicians as Partners Consumer drug information should support and encourage open patient-physician communication, so that the resulting plan of care, including drug therapy, is mutually satisfactory. Physicians play a vital role in working with patients and other health-care providers to achieve optimal drug therapy, not only through writing prescriptions but through discussing proposed drugs and their use in the context of the overall management of the patient's condition. In addition, physicians and other health care providers, and their associations, can play a valuable part in disseminating drug and other health information to the public. Principle #10: Research and Evaluation Ongoing research should be conducted into the impact of drug information and DTCA on the health care system, with particular emphasis on its effect on appropriateness of prescribing, and on health outcomes. 1 DTCA is not legal in Canada, except for notification of price, quantity and the name of the drug. However, "information-seeking" advertisements for prescription drugs, which may provide the name of the drug without mentioning its indications, or announce that treatments are available for specific indications without mentioning drugs by name, have appeared in Canadian mass media. 2 Though the paper applies primarily to prescription drug information, its principles are also applicable to health information in general.
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Physical activity

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1881
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
BD05-03-55
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
BD05-03-55
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal/provincial/territorial governments to explore tax incentives as a possible component of a broad comprehensive strategy to increase physical activity.
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Capacity of the medical educational and training infrastructure

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1888
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC05-68
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to commission an independent body to assess and report on the capacity of the educational and training infrastructure across Canada to expand enrolment in medicine and nursing programs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC05-68
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to commission an independent body to assess and report on the capacity of the educational and training infrastructure across Canada to expand enrolment in medicine and nursing programs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to commission an independent body to assess and report on the capacity of the educational and training infrastructure across Canada to expand enrolment in medicine and nursing programs.
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Family medicine training

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1895
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC05-75
The Canadian Medical Association will call on the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada to ensure that all medical students undergo a significant period of family medicine training in community settings that are representative of real-world general and family practice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC05-75
The Canadian Medical Association will call on the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada to ensure that all medical students undergo a significant period of family medicine training in community settings that are representative of real-world general and family practice.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will call on the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada and the College of Family Physicians of Canada to ensure that all medical students undergo a significant period of family medicine training in community settings that are representative of real-world general and family practice.
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International medical students

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1898
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC05-78
The Canadian Medical Association will approach international medical associations to determine best practices for attracting medical students to family medicine and methods for securing a strong professional and adequately compensated future for general and family practitioners.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC05-78
The Canadian Medical Association will approach international medical associations to determine best practices for attracting medical students to family medicine and methods for securing a strong professional and adequately compensated future for general and family practitioners.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will approach international medical associations to determine best practices for attracting medical students to family medicine and methods for securing a strong professional and adequately compensated future for general and family practitioners.
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Physician workforce planning for under-serviced areas

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1900
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC05-80
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that any definition of under-serviced areas for physician workforce planning and related purposes must also include and recognize the needs of inner-city communities and populations, and not be limited to rural and remote locations.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC05-80
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that any definition of under-serviced areas for physician workforce planning and related purposes must also include and recognize the needs of inner-city communities and populations, and not be limited to rural and remote locations.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that any definition of under-serviced areas for physician workforce planning and related purposes must also include and recognize the needs of inner-city communities and populations, and not be limited to rural and remote locations.
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Family medicine residency positions

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1901
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC05-81
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to assign targeted funding to increase the number of family medicine residency positions to meet recent increases in medical school enrolment and other demand factors.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC05-81
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to assign targeted funding to increase the number of family medicine residency positions to meet recent increases in medical school enrolment and other demand factors.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to assign targeted funding to increase the number of family medicine residency positions to meet recent increases in medical school enrolment and other demand factors.
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Re-entry training positions

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1902
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC05-83
The Canadian Medical Association recommends to educational and licensing authorities, Provincial Governments and the Canadian Medical Forum a fourfold increase in re-entry training positions and elimination of associated return of service requirements.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2005-08-17
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC05-83
The Canadian Medical Association recommends to educational and licensing authorities, Provincial Governments and the Canadian Medical Forum a fourfold increase in re-entry training positions and elimination of associated return of service requirements.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends to educational and licensing authorities, Provincial Governments and the Canadian Medical Forum a fourfold increase in re-entry training positions and elimination of associated return of service requirements.
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Testing of antibiotics

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10157
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-69
The Canadian Medical Association supports the routine testing of antibiotics manufactured in or imported into Canada to ensure that they all comply with the labelling on the containers.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-69
The Canadian Medical Association supports the routine testing of antibiotics manufactured in or imported into Canada to ensure that they all comply with the labelling on the containers.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the routine testing of antibiotics manufactured in or imported into Canada to ensure that they all comply with the labelling on the containers.
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Mentoring of early career physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10161
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-22
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of programs that will facilitate the mentoring of early career physicians in their transition to clinical practice by experienced physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-22
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of programs that will facilitate the mentoring of early career physicians in their transition to clinical practice by experienced physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of programs that will facilitate the mentoring of early career physicians in their transition to clinical practice by experienced physicians.
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Scopes of practice

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10162
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC11-23
The Canadian Medical Association supports physicians engaging in their full scope of practice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC11-23
The Canadian Medical Association supports physicians engaging in their full scope of practice.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports physicians engaging in their full scope of practice.
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Physician recruitment and retention programs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10163
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for adequate resources and coordination for the development, implementation and ongoing evaluation of physician recruitment and retention programs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for adequate resources and coordination for the development, implementation and ongoing evaluation of physician recruitment and retention programs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for adequate resources and coordination for the development, implementation and ongoing evaluation of physician recruitment and retention programs.
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Courses on health system operations and financing

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10164
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-26
The Canadian Medical Association requests the faculties of medicine to include courses on health system operations and financing in the curricula.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-26
The Canadian Medical Association requests the faculties of medicine to include courses on health system operations and financing in the curricula.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association requests the faculties of medicine to include courses on health system operations and financing in the curricula.
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Informed career choices

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10165
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC11-28
The Canadian Medical Association will assist physicians during all stages of their career, with special emphasis on helping medical students and residents make informed career choices by providing job-trend data and other career-planning resources.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC11-28
The Canadian Medical Association will assist physicians during all stages of their career, with special emphasis on helping medical students and residents make informed career choices by providing job-trend data and other career-planning resources.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will assist physicians during all stages of their career, with special emphasis on helping medical students and residents make informed career choices by providing job-trend data and other career-planning resources.
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Sale of undergraduate training positions

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10181
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC11-85
The Canadian Medical Association opposes the sale of undergraduate training positions to foreign students if this practice reduces the opportunities for Canadian applicants or negatively affects their educational experience.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC11-85
The Canadian Medical Association opposes the sale of undergraduate training positions to foreign students if this practice reduces the opportunities for Canadian applicants or negatively affects their educational experience.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association opposes the sale of undergraduate training positions to foreign students if this practice reduces the opportunities for Canadian applicants or negatively affects their educational experience.
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Techniques of advocacy and leadership

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10182
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-86
The Canadian Medical Association actively encourages and will facilitate the incorporation of increased formal training in the techniques of advocacy and leadership in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical curricula.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-86
The Canadian Medical Association actively encourages and will facilitate the incorporation of increased formal training in the techniques of advocacy and leadership in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical curricula.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association actively encourages and will facilitate the incorporation of increased formal training in the techniques of advocacy and leadership in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical curricula.
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Postgraduate training positions

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10188
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-27
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a national forum to foster the alignment of postgraduate training positions with current and future societal needs, evolving models of care delivery and available health system resources.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-27
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a national forum to foster the alignment of postgraduate training positions with current and future societal needs, evolving models of care delivery and available health system resources.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a national forum to foster the alignment of postgraduate training positions with current and future societal needs, evolving models of care delivery and available health system resources.
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Modern media for the delivery of medical care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10198
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-76
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of training in the uses of modern media for the delivery of medical care in undergraduate and postgraduate medical training programs within Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-76
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of training in the uses of modern media for the delivery of medical care in undergraduate and postgraduate medical training programs within Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of training in the uses of modern media for the delivery of medical care in undergraduate and postgraduate medical training programs within Canada.
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Retention strategies

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10202
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-33
The Canadian Medical Association supports the enhancement of retention strategies for physicians who are nearing retirement.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC11-33
The Canadian Medical Association supports the enhancement of retention strategies for physicians who are nearing retirement.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the enhancement of retention strategies for physicians who are nearing retirement.
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51 records – page 1 of 3.