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Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance -December 7, 2007

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9057
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
It is a pleasure to address the Standing Committee on Finance today as part of your pre-budget consultations. In keeping with the theme set by the Committee, our presentation - Tax Incentives for Better Living - focuses on changing the tax system to better support the health and well being of all Canadians. Today I will share with you three recommendations improving the health of Canadians and productivity of the Canadian economy: First, tax incentives for pre-paid long-term care insurance; Second, tax incentives to retain and recruit more doctors and nurses; Third, tax incentives to enhance health system productivity and quality improvements. 1. Long Term Care insurance Canada's population is ageing fast. Yet, long-term care has received little policy attention in Canada. Unlike other countries like the UK and Germany who have systems in place, Canada is not prepared to address these looming challenges. The first of the baby-boomers will turn 65 in 2011. By 2031, seniors will comprise one quarter of the population - double the current proportion of 13%. The second challenge is the lack of health service labour force that will be able to care for this ageing population. Long-term care cannot and should not be financed on the same pay-as-you-go basis as medical/hospital insurance. Therefore the CMA urges the Committee to consider either tax-pre-paid or tax-deferred options for funding long-term care. These options are examined in full in the package we have supplied you with today. 2. Improving access to quality care Canada's physician shortage is a critical issue. Here in Quebec, 1 in 4 people do not have access to a family physician. Overall 3.5 people in Canada do not have a family Physician. Despite this dire shortage, the Canada Student Loans program creates barriers to the training of more physicians. Medical students routinely begin their postgraduate training with debts of over $120,000. Although still in training, they must begin paying back their medical school loans as they complete their graduate training. This policy affects both the kind of specialty that physicians-in-training choose, and ultimately where they decide to practice. We urge this Committee to recommend the extension of interest-free status on Canada Student Loans for all eligible health professional students pursuing postgraduate training. 3. Health System IT: increasing productivity and quality of care The last issue I will address is health system automation. Investment in information technology will lead to better, safer and cheaper patient care. In spite of the recent $400 million transfer to Canada Health Infoway, Canada still ranks at the bottom of the G8 countries in access to health information technologies. We spend just one-third of the OECD average on IT in our hospitals. This is a significant factor with respect to our poor record in avoidable adverse health effects. An Electronic Health Record (EHR) could provide annual, system-wide savings of $6.1 billion - every year - and reduce wait times and thereby absenteeism. But, the EHR potential can only be realized if physician's offices across Canada are fully automated. The federal government could invest directly in physician office automation by introducing dedicated tax credits or by accelerating the capital cost allowance related to health information technologies for patients. Before I conclude, the CMA again urges the Committee to address a long-standing tax issue that costs physicians and the health care system over $65 million a year. When you add hospitals - that cost more than doubles to over $145 million-or the equivalent of 60 MRI machines a year. The application of the GST on physicians is a consumption tax on a producer of vital services and affects the ability of physicians to provide care to their patients. And now with the emphasis on further sales tax harmonization, the problem will be compounded. Nearly 20 years ago when the GST was put into place, physician office expenses were relatively low for example: tongue depressors, bandages and small things. There was practically no use computers or information technology. How many of you used computers 20 years ago? Now Canadian physicians' could be and should be using 21st century equipment that is expensive but powerful. This powerful diagnostic equipment can save lives and save the system millions of dollars in the long run. It provides a clear return on investment. Yet, physicians still have to pay the GST (and the PST) on diagnostic equipment that costs a minimum of $500,000 that's an extra $30,000 that physicians must pay. The result of this misalignment of tax policy and health policy is that most Radiologists' diagnostic imaging equipment is over 30-years old. Canadians deserve better. It's time for the federal government to stop taxing health care. We urge the Committee to recommend the "zero-rating" publicly funded health services or to provide one-hundred percent tax rebates to physicians and hospitals. Conclusion In conclusion, we trust the Committee recognizes the benefits of aligning tax policy with health policy in order to create the right incentives for citizens to realize their potential. By supporting: 1. Tax Incentives for Long-Term Care 2. Tax Incentives to Bolster Health Human Resources and, 3. Tax Incentives to Support Health System Automation. This committee can respond to immediate access to health care pressures that Canadians are facing. Delaying a response to these pressures will have an impact on the competiveness of our economy now, and with compounding effects in the future. I appreciate the opportunity of entering into a dialogue with members of the Committee and look forward to your questions. Thank you.
Documents
Less detail

Best practices for smartphone and smart-device clinical photo taking and sharing

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13860
Date
2018-03-03
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Date
2018-03-03
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
Clinical photography is a valuable tool for physicians. Smartphones, as well as other devices supporting network connectivity, offer a convenient, efficient method to take and share images. However, due to the private nature of the information contained in clinical photographs there are concerns as to the appropriate storage, dissemination, and documentation of clinical images. Confidentiality of image data must be considered and the dissemination of these images onto servers must respect the privacy and rights of the patient. Importantly, patient information should be considered as any information deriving from a patient, and the concepts outlined therefore apply to any media that can be collected on, or transmitted with, a smart-device. Clinical photography can aid in documenting form and function, in tracking conditions and wound healing, in planning surgical operations, and in clinical decision-making. Additionally, clinical photographs can provide physicians with a valuable tool for patient communication and education. Due to the convenience of this type of technology it is not appropriate to expect physicians to forego their use in providing their patients with the best care available. The technology and software required for secure transfer, communication, and storage of clinical media is presently available, but many devices have non-secure storage/dissemination options enabled and lack user-control for permanently deleting digital files. In addition, data uploaded onto server systems commonly cross legal jurisdictions. Many physicians are not comfortable with the practice, citing security, privacy, and confidentiality concerns as well as uncertainty in regards to regional regulations governing this practice.1 Due to concern for patient privacy and confidentiality it is therefore incredibly important to limit the unsecure or undocumented acquisition or dissemination of clinical photographs. To assess the current state of this topic, Heyns et al. have reviewed the accessibility and completeness of provincial and territorial medical regulatory college guidelines.2 Categories identified as vital and explored in this review included: Consent; Storage; Retention; Audit; Transmission; and Breach. While each regulatory body has addressed limited aspects of the overall issue, the authors found a general lack of available information and call for a unified document outlining pertinent instructions for conducting clinical photography using a smartphone and the electronic transmission of patient information.2 The discussion of this topic will need to be ongoing and it is important that physicians are aware of applicable regulations, both at the federal and provincial levels, and how these regulations may impact the use of personal devices. The best practices supported here aim to provide physicians and healthcare providers with an understanding of the scope and gravity of the current environment, as well as the information needed to ensure patient privacy and confidentiality is assessed and protected while physicians utilize accessible clinical photography to advance patient care. Importantly, this document only focusses on medical use (clinical, academic, and educational) of clinical photography and, while discussing many core concepts of patient privacy and confidentiality of information, should not be perceived as a complete or binding framework. Additionally, it is recommended that physicians understand the core competencies of clinical photography, which are not described here. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) suggests that the following recommendations be implemented, as thoroughly as possible, to best align with the CMA policy on the Principles for the Protection of Patient Privacy (CMA Policy PD2018-02). These key recommendations represent a non-exhaustive set of best practices - physicians should seek additional information as needed to gain a thorough understanding and to stay current in this rapidly changing field. KEY RECOMMENDATIONS 1. CONSENT * Informed consent must be obtained, preferably prior, to photography with a mobile device. This applies for each and any such encounter and the purpose made clear (i.e. clinical, research, education, publication, etc.). Patients should also be made aware that they may request a copy of a picture or for a picture to be deleted. * A patient's consent to use electronic transmission does not relieve a physician of their duty to protect the confidentiality of patient information. Also, a patient's consent cannot override other jurisdictionally mandated security requirements. * All patient consents (including verbal) should be documented. The acquisition and recording of patient consent for medical photography/dissemination may be held to a high standard of accountability due to the patient privacy and confidentiality issues inherent in the use of this technology. Written and signed consent is encouraged. * Consent should be considered as necessary for any and all photography involving a patient, whether or not that patient can be directly recognized, due to the possibility of linked information and the potential for breach of privacy. The definition of non-identifiable photos must be carefully considered. Current technologies such as face recognition and pattern matching (e.g. skin markers, physical structure, etc.), especially in combination with identifying information, have the potential to create a privacy breach. * Unsecure text and email messaging requires explicit patient consent and should not be used unless the current gold standards of security are not accessible. For a patient-initiated unsecure transmission, consent should be clarified and not assumed. 2. TRANSMISSION * Transmission of photos and patient information should be encrypted as per current-day gold standards (presently, end-to-end encryption (E2EE)) and use only secure servers that are subject to Canadian laws. Explicit, informed consent is required otherwise due to privacy concerns or standards for servers in other jurisdictions. Generally, free internet-based communication services and public internet access are unsecure technologies and often operate on servers outside of Canadian jurisdiction. * Efforts should be made to use the most secure transmission method possible. For data security purposes, identifying information should never be included in the image, any frame of a video, the file name, or linked messages. * The sender should always ensure that each recipient is intended and appropriate and, if possible, receipt of transmission should be confirmed by the recipient. 3. STORAGE * Storing images and data on a smart-device should be limited as much as possible for data protection purposes. * Clinical photos, as well as messages or other patient-related information, should be completely segregated from the device's personal storage. This can be accomplished by using an app that creates a secure, password-protected folder on the device. * All information stored (on internal memory or cloud) must be strongly encrypted and password protected. The security measures must be more substantial than the general password unlock feature on mobile devices. * Efforts should be made to dissociate identifying information from images when images are exported from a secure server. Media should not be uploaded to platforms without an option for securely deleting information without consent from the patient, and only if there are no better options. Automatic back-up of photos to unsecure cloud servers should be deactivated. Further, other back-up or syncing options that could lead to unsecure server involvement should be ascertained and the risks mitigated. 4. Cloud storage should be on a Canadian and SOCII certified server. Explicit, informed consent is required otherwise due to privacy concerns for servers in other jurisdictions. 5. AUDIT & RETENTION * It is important to create an audit trail for the purposes of transparency and medical best practice. Key information includes patient and health information, consent type and details, pertinent information regarding the photography (date, circumstance, photographer), and any other important facts such as access granted/deletion requests. * Access to the stored information must be by the authorized physician or health care provider and for the intended purpose, as per the consent given. Records should be stored such that it is possible to print/transfer as necessary. * Original photos should be retained and not overwritten. * All photos and associated messages may be considered part of the patient's clinical records and should be maintained for at least 10 years or 10 years after the age of majority, whichever is longer. When possible, patient information (including photos and message histories between health professionals) should be retained and amalgamated with a patient's medical record. Provincial regulations regarding retention of clinical records may vary and other regulations may apply to other entities - e.g. 90 years from date of birth applies to records at the federal level. * It may not be allowable to erase a picture if it is integral to a clinical decision or provincial, federal, or other applicable regulations require their retention. 6. BREACH * Any breach should be taken seriously and should be reviewed. All reasonable efforts must be made to prevent a breach before one occurs. A breach occurs when personal information, communication, or photos of patients are stolen, lost, or mistakenly disclosed. This includes loss or theft of one's mobile device, texting to the wrong number or emailing/messaging to the wrong person(s), or accidentally showing a clinical photo that exists in the phone's personal photo album. * It should be noted that non-identifying information, when combined with other available information (e.g. a text message with identifiers or another image with identifiers), can lead to highly accurate re-identification. * At present, apps downloaded to a smart-device for personal use may be capable of collecting and sharing information - the rapidly changing nature of this technology and the inherent privacy concerns requires regular attention. Use of specialized apps designed for health-information sharing that help safeguard patient information in this context is worth careful consideration. * Having remote wipe (i.e. device reformatting) capabilities is an asset and can help contain a breach. However, inappropriate access may take place before reformatting occurs. * If a smartphone is strongly encrypted and has no clinical photos stored locally then its loss may not be considered a breach. * In the event of a breach any patient potentially involved must be notified as soon as possible. The CMPA, the organization/hospital, and the Provincial licensing College should also be contacted immediately. Provincial regulations regarding notification of breach may vary. Approved by the CMA Board of Directors March 2018 References i Heyns M†, Steve A‡, Dumestre DO‡, Fraulin FO‡, Yeung JK‡ † University of Calgary, Canada ‡ Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Canada 1 Chan N, Charette J, Dumestre DO, Fraulin FO. Should 'smart phones' be used for patient photography? Plast Surg (Oakv). 2016;24(1):32-4. 2 Unpublished - Heyns M, Steve A, Dumestre DO, Fraulin FO, Yeung J. Canadian Guidelines on Smartphone Clinical Photography.
Documents
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National Physician Human Resource Strategy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8879
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
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Collaborative care model

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8881
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-39
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-39
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
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Physician assistants

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8882
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-40
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates to develop a plan to enable the further expansion and integration of physician assistants into civilian health care in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-40
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates to develop a plan to enable the further expansion and integration of physician assistants into civilian health care in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates to develop a plan to enable the further expansion and integration of physician assistants into civilian health care in Canada.
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Resident physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8884
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-42
The Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Association of Interns and Residents advocate that Canadian resident physicians be permitted to work under limited licensure provisions.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-42
The Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Association of Interns and Residents advocate that Canadian resident physicians be permitted to work under limited licensure provisions.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Association of Interns and Residents advocate that Canadian resident physicians be permitted to work under limited licensure provisions.
Less detail
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-84
The Canadian Medical Association will study the "gap in generalism" and collaborate with other stakeholders to identify proactive measures that will help to fill the gap and enable generalists to thrive in our health care system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-84
The Canadian Medical Association will study the "gap in generalism" and collaborate with other stakeholders to identify proactive measures that will help to fill the gap and enable generalists to thrive in our health care system.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will study the "gap in generalism" and collaborate with other stakeholders to identify proactive measures that will help to fill the gap and enable generalists to thrive in our health care system.
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Family medicine

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8908
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-94
The Canadian Medical Association supports and promotes the efforts and initiatives of the College of Family Physicians of Canada to make family medicine a more attractive career choice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-94
The Canadian Medical Association supports and promotes the efforts and initiatives of the College of Family Physicians of Canada to make family medicine a more attractive career choice.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports and promotes the efforts and initiatives of the College of Family Physicians of Canada to make family medicine a more attractive career choice.
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Reforms to medical education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8909
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-95
The Canadian Medical Association supports and encourages the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, College of Family Physicians of Canada and Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada to explore reforms to undergraduate and postgraduate medical education that address issues such as social accountability, early career decision-making and flexibility in medical training.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-95
The Canadian Medical Association supports and encourages the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, College of Family Physicians of Canada and Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada to explore reforms to undergraduate and postgraduate medical education that address issues such as social accountability, early career decision-making and flexibility in medical training.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports and encourages the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, College of Family Physicians of Canada and Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada to explore reforms to undergraduate and postgraduate medical education that address issues such as social accountability, early career decision-making and flexibility in medical training.
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Taking the Pulse of Specialty Care: an Online Consultation with Canada's Physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8910
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-96
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the recommendations for improving access to enhanced skills training and reducing re-entry barriers identified in Taking the Pulse of Specialty Care: an Online Consultation with Canada's Physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-96
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the recommendations for improving access to enhanced skills training and reducing re-entry barriers identified in Taking the Pulse of Specialty Care: an Online Consultation with Canada's Physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the recommendations for improving access to enhanced skills training and reducing re-entry barriers identified in Taking the Pulse of Specialty Care: an Online Consultation with Canada's Physicians.
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Undergraduate medical education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8911
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-97
The Canadian Medical Association encourages faculties of medicine and governments to increase the capacity of the undergraduate medical education system to offer clinical electives to Canadian students studying medicine abroad.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-97
The Canadian Medical Association encourages faculties of medicine and governments to increase the capacity of the undergraduate medical education system to offer clinical electives to Canadian students studying medicine abroad.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages faculties of medicine and governments to increase the capacity of the undergraduate medical education system to offer clinical electives to Canadian students studying medicine abroad.
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Expanded scopes of practice

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8912
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-98
The Canadian Medical Association urges national specialty societies, faculties of medicine and educational colleges to develop a nationally coordinated strategy to provide physicians with access to enhanced skills training for expanded scopes of practice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-98
The Canadian Medical Association urges national specialty societies, faculties of medicine and educational colleges to develop a nationally coordinated strategy to provide physicians with access to enhanced skills training for expanded scopes of practice.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges national specialty societies, faculties of medicine and educational colleges to develop a nationally coordinated strategy to provide physicians with access to enhanced skills training for expanded scopes of practice.
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Evaluation of international medical graduates

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8913
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC07-99
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national standardized assessment protocol to evaluate international medical graduates.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC07-99
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national standardized assessment protocol to evaluate international medical graduates.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national standardized assessment protocol to evaluate international medical graduates.
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Canada Health Infoway

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8924
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC07-110
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on Canada Health Infoway to support physicians in developing electronic medical records and linkages to electronic health records by making funding directly available to physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC07-110
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on Canada Health Infoway to support physicians in developing electronic medical records and linkages to electronic health records by making funding directly available to physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on Canada Health Infoway to support physicians in developing electronic medical records and linkages to electronic health records by making funding directly available to physicians.
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Physician retention

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8926
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
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Physician advocates

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8927
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-113
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and advocate strongly for the implementation of policy to safeguard physicians from fear of reprisal and retaliation when speaking out as advocates for their patients and communities.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-113
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and advocate strongly for the implementation of policy to safeguard physicians from fear of reprisal and retaliation when speaking out as advocates for their patients and communities.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and advocate strongly for the implementation of policy to safeguard physicians from fear of reprisal and retaliation when speaking out as advocates for their patients and communities.
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Environmental factors and health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8934
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-70
The Canadian Medical Association will enhance its work on the issues related to health and the environment by: a. highlighting the work of physicians who participate actively in national and international activities associated with improving the environment; b. advocating for programs to prevent or reduce the human and environmental health impact from global climate change and environmental degradation; c. lobbying policy decision-makers to incorporate concerns for human health into current environmental research and all public policy initiatives and; d. strengthening its relationships with appropriate environmental health agencies, such as Environment Canada and the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-70
The Canadian Medical Association will enhance its work on the issues related to health and the environment by: a. highlighting the work of physicians who participate actively in national and international activities associated with improving the environment; b. advocating for programs to prevent or reduce the human and environmental health impact from global climate change and environmental degradation; c. lobbying policy decision-makers to incorporate concerns for human health into current environmental research and all public policy initiatives and; d. strengthening its relationships with appropriate environmental health agencies, such as Environment Canada and the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will enhance its work on the issues related to health and the environment by: a. highlighting the work of physicians who participate actively in national and international activities associated with improving the environment; b. advocating for programs to prevent or reduce the human and environmental health impact from global climate change and environmental degradation; c. lobbying policy decision-makers to incorporate concerns for human health into current environmental research and all public policy initiatives and; d. strengthening its relationships with appropriate environmental health agencies, such as Environment Canada and the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy.
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Environmental stewardship

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8936
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-74
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-74
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
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The role of family physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8937
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-86
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to develop strategies promoting the role of family physicians in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-86
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to develop strategies promoting the role of family physicians in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to develop strategies promoting the role of family physicians in Canada.
Less detail

Medical Laboratory Assistants

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8987
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health human resources
Resolution
BD07-06-204
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) approves the inclusion of medical laboratory assistant as a CMA-designated health science profession in the conjoint accreditation process.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health human resources
Resolution
BD07-06-204
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) approves the inclusion of medical laboratory assistant as a CMA-designated health science profession in the conjoint accreditation process.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) approves the inclusion of medical laboratory assistant as a CMA-designated health science profession in the conjoint accreditation process.
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