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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


95 records – page 1 of 5.

Data on maternal morbidity and mortality and infant births and deaths

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8505
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC06-13
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates will call on governments to ensure that the data collected on maternal morbidity and mortality and infant births and deaths are comparable across Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC06-13
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates will call on governments to ensure that the data collected on maternal morbidity and mortality and infant births and deaths are comparable across Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates will call on governments to ensure that the data collected on maternal morbidity and mortality and infant births and deaths are comparable across Canada.
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Recommendations pertaining to children's mental health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8507
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-15
The Canadian Medical Association endorses all of the recommendations pertaining to children's mental health in the Senate report, Out of the Shadows at Last - Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-15
The Canadian Medical Association endorses all of the recommendations pertaining to children's mental health in the Senate report, Out of the Shadows at Last - Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses all of the recommendations pertaining to children's mental health in the Senate report, Out of the Shadows at Last - Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada.
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Access to the comprehensive spectrum of medically necessary care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8508
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC06-34
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates call on the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Conference of Health Ministers to ensure that all Canadians have timely access to the comprehensive spectrum of medically necessary care by developing, through an open and consultative process, a policy framework that includes: a) a national human resources plan; b) national wait time benchmarks; c) a patient wait time guarantee supported by a publicly funded safety valve; and d) a regulatory regime to best support the public-private interface.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC06-34
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates call on the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Conference of Health Ministers to ensure that all Canadians have timely access to the comprehensive spectrum of medically necessary care by developing, through an open and consultative process, a policy framework that includes: a) a national human resources plan; b) national wait time benchmarks; c) a patient wait time guarantee supported by a publicly funded safety valve; and d) a regulatory regime to best support the public-private interface.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates call on the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Conference of Health Ministers to ensure that all Canadians have timely access to the comprehensive spectrum of medically necessary care by developing, through an open and consultative process, a policy framework that includes: a) a national human resources plan; b) national wait time benchmarks; c) a patient wait time guarantee supported by a publicly funded safety valve; and d) a regulatory regime to best support the public-private interface.
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Pan-Canadian medically determined wait time benchmarks

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8512
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC06-38
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with provincial and territorial divisions, will build on the work of the Wait Time Alliance by establishing pan-Canadian medically determined wait time benchmarks for all major diagnostic, therapeutic, surgical and emergency services by December 31, 2007.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC06-38
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with provincial and territorial divisions, will build on the work of the Wait Time Alliance by establishing pan-Canadian medically determined wait time benchmarks for all major diagnostic, therapeutic, surgical and emergency services by December 31, 2007.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with provincial and territorial divisions, will build on the work of the Wait Time Alliance by establishing pan-Canadian medically determined wait time benchmarks for all major diagnostic, therapeutic, surgical and emergency services by December 31, 2007.
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Funding and delivery of long-term care in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8518
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC06-45
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a discussion paper with policy principles and a full range of options for the funding and delivery of long-term care in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC06-45
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a discussion paper with policy principles and a full range of options for the funding and delivery of long-term care in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a discussion paper with policy principles and a full range of options for the funding and delivery of long-term care in Canada.
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Insurance fund of last resort

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8520
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC06-16
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to create an insurance fund of last resort to provide financial relief to parents for the catastrophic cost of drugs and other health care services provided to children as part of an accepted treatment protocol for childhood illnesses and disorders when not covered by public insurance.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC06-16
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to create an insurance fund of last resort to provide financial relief to parents for the catastrophic cost of drugs and other health care services provided to children as part of an accepted treatment protocol for childhood illnesses and disorders when not covered by public insurance.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to create an insurance fund of last resort to provide financial relief to parents for the catastrophic cost of drugs and other health care services provided to children as part of an accepted treatment protocol for childhood illnesses and disorders when not covered by public insurance.
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Health care services for children

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8523
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC06-19
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to work closely with health stakeholders to provide seamless delivery of a comprehensive basket of mental and developmental health care services for children.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC06-19
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to work closely with health stakeholders to provide seamless delivery of a comprehensive basket of mental and developmental health care services for children.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to work closely with health stakeholders to provide seamless delivery of a comprehensive basket of mental and developmental health care services for children.
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Obesity epidemic in young Canadians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8526
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-22
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to implement a Canada-wide Child & Youth Growth Index to measure, monitor and evaluate the current obesity epidemic in young Canadians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-22
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to implement a Canada-wide Child & Youth Growth Index to measure, monitor and evaluate the current obesity epidemic in young Canadians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to implement a Canada-wide Child & Youth Growth Index to measure, monitor and evaluate the current obesity epidemic in young Canadians.
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Breast-feeding of infants in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8531
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-28
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments develop and implement a comprehensive plan to promote and support breast-feeding of infants in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-28
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments develop and implement a comprehensive plan to promote and support breast-feeding of infants in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments develop and implement a comprehensive plan to promote and support breast-feeding of infants in Canada.
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Wait time monitoring

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8532
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-29
The Canadian Medical Association considers that wait time monitoring should be extended to all diagnoses treatments involving youth with developmental or mental health problems.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-29
The Canadian Medical Association considers that wait time monitoring should be extended to all diagnoses treatments involving youth with developmental or mental health problems.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association considers that wait time monitoring should be extended to all diagnoses treatments involving youth with developmental or mental health problems.
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Coercive legislation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8539
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC06-69
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions staunchly oppose any form of coercive legislation in regard to the negotiation of working conditions and compensation of physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC06-69
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions staunchly oppose any form of coercive legislation in regard to the negotiation of working conditions and compensation of physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its divisions staunchly oppose any form of coercive legislation in regard to the negotiation of working conditions and compensation of physicians.
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Nicotine-based drinks

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8541
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-71
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the Federal Minister of Health to ban the sale or distribution of nicotine-based drinks in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-71
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the Federal Minister of Health to ban the sale or distribution of nicotine-based drinks in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the Federal Minister of Health to ban the sale or distribution of nicotine-based drinks in Canada.
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Encouraging the consumption of nutritious foods

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8543
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-73
The Canadian Medical Association urges all levels of government to set an example to Canadian schools and workplaces by encouraging the consumption of nutritious foods and banning the sale of high-calorie, nutrient-poor foods, in government buildings and facilities.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-73
The Canadian Medical Association urges all levels of government to set an example to Canadian schools and workplaces by encouraging the consumption of nutritious foods and banning the sale of high-calorie, nutrient-poor foods, in government buildings and facilities.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges all levels of government to set an example to Canadian schools and workplaces by encouraging the consumption of nutritious foods and banning the sale of high-calorie, nutrient-poor foods, in government buildings and facilities.
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Canadian Injury Control Strategy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8545
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-75
The Canadian Medical Association urges the immediate implementation of a Canadian Injury Control Strategy.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-75
The Canadian Medical Association urges the immediate implementation of a Canadian Injury Control Strategy.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the immediate implementation of a Canadian Injury Control Strategy.
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Sale of clove, herbal and vitamin cigarettes

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8547
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-77
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to study the possibility of national legislation governing the promotion and sale of clove, herbal and vitamin cigarettes.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC06-77
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to study the possibility of national legislation governing the promotion and sale of clove, herbal and vitamin cigarettes.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to study the possibility of national legislation governing the promotion and sale of clove, herbal and vitamin cigarettes.
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Medical schools placing trainees

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8550
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC06-81
The Canadian Medical Association urges medical schools placing trainees in overlapping geographic areas to coordinate these placements cooperatively to ensure appropriate learning opportunities for trainees.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC06-81
The Canadian Medical Association urges medical schools placing trainees in overlapping geographic areas to coordinate these placements cooperatively to ensure appropriate learning opportunities for trainees.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges medical schools placing trainees in overlapping geographic areas to coordinate these placements cooperatively to ensure appropriate learning opportunities for trainees.
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Pharmacists who are given independent prescribing authority

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8557
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC06-67
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with its divisions and affiliates, without endorsing pharmacist independent prescribing strongly urges the Government of Alberta to require pharmacists who are given independent prescribing authority to: a) require explicit, informed consent from a patient; b) maintain a patient's record; c) provide 24-hour availability to the patient; d) carry appropriate coverage for legal liability; e) disclose any potential conflict of interest as both a prescriber and dispenser of medication; and, f) if the pharmacist changes a physician's prescription, advise the physician of the change(s).
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2006-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC06-67
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with its divisions and affiliates, without endorsing pharmacist independent prescribing strongly urges the Government of Alberta to require pharmacists who are given independent prescribing authority to: a) require explicit, informed consent from a patient; b) maintain a patient's record; c) provide 24-hour availability to the patient; d) carry appropriate coverage for legal liability; e) disclose any potential conflict of interest as both a prescriber and dispenser of medication; and, f) if the pharmacist changes a physician's prescription, advise the physician of the change(s).
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in conjunction with its divisions and affiliates, without endorsing pharmacist independent prescribing strongly urges the Government of Alberta to require pharmacists who are given independent prescribing authority to: a) require explicit, informed consent from a patient; b) maintain a patient's record; c) provide 24-hour availability to the patient; d) carry appropriate coverage for legal liability; e) disclose any potential conflict of interest as both a prescriber and dispenser of medication; and, f) if the pharmacist changes a physician's prescription, advise the physician of the change(s).
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Organ and tissue donation and transplantation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14126
Date
2019-12-07
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
  2 documents  
Policy Type
Policy document
Date
2019-12-07
Replaces
Organ and tissue donation and transplantation (update 2015)
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Text
Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation (OTDT) is a rapidly changing area of medical science and practice. Organ and tissue transplantations represent significant lifesaving and life-enhancing interventions that require careful consideration by multiple stakeholders spanning medical disciplines. Technological and pharmacological advancements have made organ and tissue transplantation increasingly viable for treating related medical conditions. Changing social norms have also led to shifting perceptions of the acceptability of organ and tissue donation. Within this context, there is a need for renewed consideration of the ethical issues and principles guiding organ and tissue donation and transplantation in Canada. The overarching principle that guides OTDT is public trust, which requires that the expressed intent either for or against donation will be honoured and respected within the donation and medical systems, and that the best interests of the potential donor are always of paramount importance; policies and mechanisms that guide OTDT should aim to maintain and foster that public trust. The CMA acknowledges and respects the diverse viewpoints, backgrounds, and religious views of physicians and patients and therefore encourages physicians to confront challenges raised by OTDT in a way that is consistent with both standards of medical ethics and patients’ values and beliefs. SCOPE This policy identifies foundational principles to address the challenges surrounding deceased and living donation. In conjunction with applicable laws and regulations in Canada, the Declaration of Istanbul, the World Health Organization (WHO) Guiding Principles on Human Cell, Tissue and Organ Transplantation, and leading clinical practices this policy aims to inform physicians and other interested parties on the guiding principles of OTDT in Canada. This policy is intended to address OTDT in adult populations; the challenges, considerations, legislation, and policy surrounding pediatric and neonatal OTDT are unique and deserve focused attention. Physicians should be aware of relevant legislation, regulatory requirements, and policies in the jurisdiction in which they practice. Physicians are encouraged to refer to the various Canadian specialty societies that deal directly with OTDT for up-to-date information and policy, as well as innovative techniques and approaches. GUIDING PRINCIPLES The practice of OTDT is of great value to patients and society. The CMA supports the continued development of greater capacity, efficiency, and accessibility in OTDT systems in co-ordination with comprehensive and compassionate end-of-life care for Canadians while acknowledging the importance of justice, informed consent, beneficence, and confidentiality to this practice. 1. JUSTICE There is a continuous need to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of OTDT in an effort to narrow the gap between demand and supply in what remains a scarce, lifesaving resource. The principle of justice should continue to guide the equitable allocation of organs and tissues in a manner that is externally justifiable, open to public scrutiny, and balances considerations of fairness (e.g., medical need or length of time on the wait-list) with medical utility (e.g., transplantation success). There should be no discrimination based on social status or perceived social worth. Lifestyle or behavioral factors should only be considered when clear evidence indicates that those factors will impact the medical probability of success. OTDT should also not rely on the patient’s ability to pay; such actions are inconsistent with the principles that underlie Canada’s publicly-funded health system. Of note, living donation to a loved one or acquaintance (via a directed donation) is regarded as ethically acceptable if potential donors are informed of all options, including that of donating in a non-directed fashion. All levels of government should continue to support initiatives to improve the OTDT system, raise public awareness through education and outreach campaigns, and fund ongoing research, such that any Canadian who may wish to donate their tissues or organs are given every reasonable opportunity to do so. Potential donor identification and referral, while legislated in many jurisdictions, is an important area of continued development as failure to identify donors deprives families of the opportunity to donate and deprives patients of potential transplants. To diminish inequities in the rates of organ donation between jurisdictions, federal and provincial governments should engage in consultations with a view to implementing a coordinated, national strategy on OTDT that provides consistency and clarity on medical and legal standards of informed consent and determination of death, and institutes access to emerging best practices that support physicians, providers, and patients. Efforts should be made to ensure adequate engagement with potential donors from communities that have historically had lower living donor rates to help reduce inequities in access to living donation. Policymakers should also continue to explore and appraise the evidence on policy interventions to improve the rates of organ donation in Canada – for example, see a brief overview of opt-in vs. opt-out donation systems in the background to this policy. 2. INFORMED CONSENT AND VOLUNTARINESS Organ and tissue donation must always be an autonomous decision, free of undue pressure or coercion. By law, the potential organ donor, or their substitute decision-maker, must provide informed consent. Physicians should direct patients to appropriate resources if that patient has expressed interest to become a donor after their death. If a potential donor has not made an expression of intent for or against donation, substitute decision-makers, families, or loved ones may be approached to provide authorization for donation. It should also be noted that consent indicates a willingness to donate, but that donation itself hinges on factors such as medical suitability and timing. End-of-life decisions must be guided by an individual's values and religious or philosophical beliefs of what it means to have a meaningful life and death. The autonomy of an individual should always be respected regarding their wish, intent, or registered commitment to become a donor after death. Input from family and loved-ones should always be considered in the context of the potential donor’s wishes or commitments – these situations must be handled on a case-by-case basis with respect for cultural and religious views while maintaining the autonomously expressed wishes of the potential donor. Physicians should make every reasonable effort to be aware and considerate of the cultural and religious views of their patients as they pertain to OTDT. Likewise, Canadian medical schools, relevant subspecialties, and institutions should provide training and continuing professional development opportunities on OTDT, including both medicolegal implications and cultural competency. To protect the voluntariness of the potential donor’s decision, public appeals to encourage altruistic donation should not seek to compensate potential donors through payment and should not subvert established systems of organ allocation. Any exploitation or coercion of a potential donor must be avoided. However, remuneration from officially sanctioned sources for the purpose of reimbursement of costs associated with living donation (e.g., transfer to another location or lost wages during the procedure), may be considered when no party profits financially from the exchange. The CMA supports proposed amendments to the Criminal Code and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act that criminalizes or otherwise seeks to prevent the coercive collection and transplantation of organs domestically and internationally (i.e., organ trafficking – see relevant guidelines on trafficking ). The CMA also discourages Canadians from participating in organ tourism as either a recipient or donor; physicians should not take part in transplantation procedures where it is reasonable to suspect that organs have been obtained without the donor’s informed consent or where the donor received payment (from WHO Guiding Principle 7); however, in accordance with physicians’ commitment to the well-being of the patient and the professional responsibilities relating to the patient-physician relationship in the CMA Code of Ethics and Professionalism, physicians have an obligation to treat a post-tranplant patient if requested after the patient has participated in organ tourism; physicians should be aware of any legal or regulatory obligations they may have to report a patient’s organ tourism to national authorities, taking into consideration their duties of privacy and confidentiality to the patient. , 3. BALANCING BENEFICENCE AND NON-MALEFICENCE Balancing beneficence and non-maleficence means to: Consider first the well-being of the patient; always act to benefit and promote the good of the patient; provide appropriate care and management across the care continuum; take all reasonable steps to prevent or minimize harm to the patient; disclose to the patient if there is a risk of harm or if harm occurs; recognize the balance of potential benefits and harms associated with any medical act; and act to bring about a positive balance of benefits over harms. Deceased Donation Prospective donors can benefit from the knowledge that they can potentially save lives after their own deaths. However, potential donors must not be harmed by the act of donating. In accordance with the Dead Donor Rule, organ or tissue procurement should never be the cause of death. Moreover, the care of the dying patient must never be compromised by the desire to protect organs for donation or expedite death to allow timely organ retrieval. Physicians determining that a potential donor has died should not be directly involved in tissue or organ removal from the donor or subsequent transplantation procedures, nor should they be responsible for the care of any intended recipients of such tissues and organs (from WHO Guiding Principle 2). Leading clinical criteria, in conjunction with legally prescribed definitions of death and procedures, should inform the determination of death before donation procedures are initiated. DCD should be practiced in compliance with the regulations of individual transplant centers, relevant legislation, and leading Canadian clinical guidelines including the national recommendations for donation after cardiocirculatory death in Canada and the guidelines for the withdrawal of life-sustaining measures. Patients undergoing medical assistance in dying (MAiD) may also be eligible for organ and tissue donation – see relevant policy guidelines. Living Donation Living donors are motivated to act primarily for the benefit of the recipient. The perceived acceptability of living donation varies from person to person; living donation is deemed to be ethically acceptable when the potential benefits outweigh the potential risks of living donation; living donation is not ethically acceptable where there is a material risk of death of the donor; living donors must provide informed consent, meet medical and psychological requirements, and receive appropriate follow-up care. It is not necessary for the potential donor to be biologically or emotionally related to the recipient. 4. CONFIDENTIALITY AND PRIVACY Current practice protects the privacy of both donor and recipient and does not allow donation teams, organ donation organizations, or transplant teams to inform either party of the other’s identity. The continuation of this practice is encouraged at the present time to protect the privacy of both donors and recipients. In addition, healthcare providers should consider the privacy and confidentiality implications of practices employed throughout the assessment and post-operative periods – patient consent should be obtained for practices involving any loss of privacy or confidentiality (e.g. group education sessions, etc.). Deceased Donation A person’s choice about whether or not they intend to donate organs and tissues after their death is individual and, like other health-related information, should be considered private. The right to privacy regarding personal health information extends beyond the declaration of death. Living Donation Whenever possible, potential donor and recipients should be cared for and evaluated by separate medical teams. In the case of non-directed donations, it may be necessary for information to be shared between donor and recipient teams (e.g. recipient’s underlying disease and risk for recurrence); however, such information should be limited to what is necessary for making an informed choice. Conversely, the CMA recognizes that the choice and process of directed donation is one that is deeply personal, which is likely to result in the intersection of both donor and recipient pathways of care. In such cases, the same onus of confidentiality may not apply given the choices of the donor and recipient involved. Approved by the CMA Board of Directors December 2019
Documents
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Equity and diversity in medicine

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14127
Date
2019-12-07
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
  3 documents  
Policy Type
Policy document
Date
2019-12-07
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
The objective of this policy is to provide guidance to physicians and institutions by identifying a set of guiding principles and commitments to promote equity and diversity in medicine (as defined in the Guiding Principles section). We address equity and diversity in medicine to improve circumstances and opportunities for all physicians and learners as part of our efforts to create a more collaborative and respectful culture and practice of medicine. To achieve this, we must redress inequities, bias, and discrimination in learning and practice environments. Individual protection from bias and discrimination is a fundamental right of all Canadians. By embracing the principles of equity and diversity, we can systematically address root causes and reduce structural barriers faced by those who want to enter the medical profession and those practicing medicine. In so doing, we improve their opportunities for advancement, health, and livelihood. The principles of equity and diversity are grounded in the fundamental commitment of the medical profession to respect for persons. This commitment recognizes that everyone has equal and inherent worth, has the right to be valued and respected, and to be treated with dignity. When we address equity and diversity, we are opening the conversation to include the voices and knowledge of those who have historically been under-represented and/or marginalized. It is a process of empowerment—where a person can engage with and take action on issues they define as important. Empowerment involves a meaningful shift in experience that fosters belonging in the profession and draws on community supports. As part of equity and diversity frameworks, inclusion is often articulated to refer to strategies used to increase an individual’s ability to contribute fully and effectively to organisational structures and processes. Inclusion strategies are specific organisational practices or programs focused on encouraging the involvement and participation of individuals from diverse backgrounds to integrate and value their perspectives in decision-making processes. Robust processes for inclusion are a vehicle to achieving equity and diversity. Thus, in this policy, the process of inclusion is understood to be positioned at the nexus of the overarching principles of equity and diversity. Equity and diversity initiatives can be carefully structured to complement and strengthen merit-based approaches. Enhanced support and appropriate methods of evaluation that increase equity of opportunity (for example, equity in training, hiring processes, and in access to resources) provide all physicians and learners with a fair opportunity to cultivate and demonstrate their unique capabilities and strengths, and to realize their full potential. Promoting equity and diversity fosters a just professional and learning culture that cultivates the diverse perspectives within it, reflects the communities physicians serve, and promotes professional excellence and social accountability as means to better serve patients. An increasingly diverse medical population provides opportunities for underserviced populations to receive better access to medical services and bolsters the management of clinical cases through the contribution of different points of view. Evidence indicates that when demonstrably more equity and diversity in medicine is achieved, physicians experience greater career satisfaction, health and wellness, and a sense of solidarity with the profession while patients experience improved care and a more responsive and adaptable health care system. Evidence further indicates that realizing the full potential of human capital is an essential driver of innovation and health system development. This policy is consistent with the CMA Code of Ethics and Professionalism and the CMA Charter of Shared Values and strives to be in the spirit of the recommendations relevant to health made in the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. The policy is informed by a body of evidence described in the accompanying Background document that includes a Glossary of terms. GUIDING PRINCIPLES A clear set of principles and commitments to improving equity and diversity demonstrates that we hold ourselves accountable to recognizing and challenging behaviours, practices, and conditions that hinder equity and diversity and to promoting behaviours, practices, and conditions that will achieve these goals. Achieving equity in medicine Equity refers to the treatment of people that recognizes and is inclusive of their differences by ensuring that every individual is provided with what they need to thrive, which may differ from the needs of others. It is a state in which all members of society have similar chances to become socially active, politically influential, and economically productive through the absence of avoidable or remediable differences among groups of people (defined socially, economically, demographically, or geographically). Equity in the medical profession is achieved when every person has the opportunity to realize their full potential to create and sustain a career without being unfairly impeded by discrimination or any other characteristic-related bias or barrier. To achieve this, physicians must 1) recognize that structural inequities that privilege some at the expense of others exist in training and practice environments and 2) commit to reducing these by putting in place measures that make recruitment, retention, and advancement opportunities more accessible, desirable, and achievable. To that end, physicians must apply evidence-based strategies and support applied research into the processes that lead to inequities in training and practice environments. Fostering diversity in medicine Diversity refers to observable and non-observable characteristics which are constructed—and sometimes chosen—by individuals, groups, and societies to identify themselves (e.g., age, culture, religion, indigeneity, ethnicity, language, gender, sexuality, health, ability, socio-economic and family status, geography). The barriers to diversity in medicine are broad and systemic. Individuals and groups with particular characteristics can be excluded from participation based on biases or barriers. Even when they are included, they are often not able to use the full range of their skills and competencies. As with improving equity, the benefits of a more diverse medical profession include improved health outcomes, system-level adaptation, and physician health and wellness. To achieve these benefits, the medical profession must become increasingly diverse by striving to create, foster, and retain physicians and learners who reflect the diversity of the communities they serve and it must be responsive to the evolving (physical, emotional, cultural, and socioeconomic) needs of patients. Promoting a just professional and learning culture Physicians value learning and understand that it reflects, and is informed by, the professional culture of medicine. A just professional and learning culture is one of shared respect, shared knowledge, shared opportunity, and the experience of learning together. An environment that is physically and psychologically safe by reducing bias, discrimination, and harassment is critical to creating and sustaining such a culture. To achieve this, the profession must strive to integrate cultural safety by fostering and adopting practices of cultural competence and cultural humility. Physicians and leaders across all levels of training, practice, and health settings, and through formal and informal mentorships, must also promote and foster environments where diverse perspectives are solicited, heard, and appreciated. In this way, diverse individuals are both represented in the professional culture of medicine and actively involved in decision-making processes in all aspects of the profession. Fostering solidarity within the profession Solidarity means standing alongside others by recognizing our commonality, shared vulnerabilities and goals, and interdependence. It is enacted through collective action and aims. To show solidarity within the profession means making a personal commitment to recognizing others as our equals, cultivating respectful, open, and transparent dialogue and relationships, and role modelling this behaviour. Solidarity enables each of us to support our colleagues in meeting their individual and collective responsibilities and accountabilities to their patients and to their colleagues. Being accountable to these goals and to each other means taking action to ensure the principles that guide the medical profession are followed, responding justly and decisively when they are not, and continually searching for ways to improve the profession through practice-based learning and experience. Promoting professional excellence and social accountability Engaged and informed research and action on equity and diversity is critical to promoting professional excellence and social accountability in medicine as means to better serve patients. Professional excellence is a fundamental commitment of the profession to contribute to the development of and innovation in medicine and society through clinical practice, research, teaching, mentorship, leadership, quality improvement, administration, and/or advocacy on behalf of the profession or the public. Social accountability is a pillar of the commitment to professional excellence by focusing those efforts on fostering competence to address the evolving health needs of the patients and communities physicians are mandated to serve. For care to be socially accountable, and to achieve professional excellence, physicians must provide leadership through advocacy and through action: advocacy about the benefits of addressing equity and diversity to achieve equitable health outcomes; and actions to be responsive to patient, community, and population health needs through high-quality evidence-based patient care. RECOMMENDATIONS To accomplish equity and diversity in medicine, organizational and institutional changes will be required across many facets of operation and culture including leadership, education, data gathering/analysis, and continuous improvement through feedback and evaluation of policies and programs. To achieve this, the CMA seeks to provide direction on broad action areas that require further specific actions and development measures in specific recruitment, training, and practice contexts. The CMA recommends: All medical organizations, institutions, and physician leaders: A. Take a leadership role in achieving greater equity and diversity by co-creating policies and processes that apply to them, and the individuals therein, in an accountable and transparent manner. This includes: 1. Identifying and reducing structural inequities, barriers, and biases that exist in training and practice environments to create fair opportunities for all physicians and learners; and providing the appropriate platforms, resources, and training necessary to do so to effect change collaboratively. 2. Practicing and promoting cultural safety, cultural competence, and cultural humility. 3. Providing training on implicit bias, allyship, cultural safety, cultural competence, and cultural humility, structural competence, and the value of diversity in improving health outcomes. 4. Ensuring a process is in place to review all workforce and educational policies, procedures, and practices toward considering their impact on equity and diversity. Areas of consideration include (but are not limited to) recruitment, promotion, pay, leave of absence, parental leave, resources and support, and working/learning conditions and accommodations. 5. Ensuring safe, appropriate, and effective avenues exist for those who may have experienced discrimination, harassment, or abuse in training and practice environments to report these events outside of their supervisory/promotional chain. Those experiencing these events should also be able to seek counselling without the fear of negative consequences. 6. Working towards creating and appropriately funding equity and diversity Chairs, Committees, or Offices with a mandate to investigate and address issues in equity and diversity. 7. Promoting and enabling formal and informal mentorship and sponsorship opportunities for historically under-represented groups. B. Encourage the collection and use of data related to equity and diversity through research and funding, and, specifically, review their data practices to ensure: 1. Historically under-represented groups are meaningfully engaged through the co-development of data practices. 2. Data regarding the representation of under-represented groups is being systematically and appropriately collected and analyzed. 3. Information collected is used to review and inform internal policy and practice with the aim of reducing or eliminating system-level drivers of inequity. 4. Findings relating to these data are made accessible. C. Support equity and diversity in recruitment, hiring, selection, appointment, and promotion practices by: 1. Requesting and participating in training to better understand approaches and strategies to promote equity and diversity, including implicit bias and allyship training that highlights the roles and responsibilities of all members of the community with emphasis on self-awareness, cultural safety, and sensitivity to intersectionalities. 2. Studying organizational environments and frameworks and identifying and addressing hiring procedures, especially for leadership and executive positions, that perpetuate institutional inequities and power structures that privilege or disadvantage people. 3. Adopting explicit criteria to recruit inclusive leaders and to promote qualified candidates from historically under-represented groups in selection processes. Additional recommendations for institutions providing medical education and training: 1. Establishing programs that espouse cultural safety, cultural competence, and cultural humility. 2. Encouraging all instructors develop competencies including non-discriminatory and non-stereotyping communication, awareness of intersectionality, and cultural safety. 3. Providing training programs, at the undergraduate level onwards, that include awareness and education around stereotypes (gender and otherwise), intersectionalities, and the value of diversity in improving health outcomes. 4. Providing diversity mentorship programs that aim to support diverse candidates through education and training to graduation. 5. Promoting and funding student-led programs that create safe and positive spaces for students and principles of equity and diversity. 6. Ensuring recruitment strategies and admission frameworks in medical schools incorporate more holistic strategies that recognize barriers faced by certain populations to enable a more diverse pool of candidates to apply and be fairly evaluated. 7. Developing learning communities (such as undergraduate pipelines described in the background document) to promote careers in medicine as a viable option for individuals from historically under-represented communities. Approved by the CMA Board of Directors December 2019
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The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change - Policy brief for Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14257
Date
2019-11-01
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Date
2019-11-01
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change Policy brief for Canada 1 Finding: Exposure to wildfires is increasing in Canada, with more than half of the 448,444 Canadians evacuated due to wildfires between 1980 and 2017 displaced in the last decade. Recommendation: Incorporate lessons learned from recent severe wildfire seasons into a strengthened pan-Canadian emergency response approach that anticipates increasing impacts as the climate continues to change. Finding: The percentage of fossil fuels powering transport in Canada remains high, though electricity and biofuels are gaining ground. Fine particulate air pollution generated by transportation killed 1063 Canadians in 2015, resulting in a loss of economic welfare for Canadians valued at approximately $8 billion dollars. Recommendation: Develop provincial and territorial legislation requiring automakers to gradually increase the annual percentage of new light-duty vehicles sold that are zero emissions, working toward a target of 100% by 2040. Finding: Canada has the third-highest per capita greenhouse gas emissions from healthcare in the world, with healthcare accounting for approximately 4% of the country’s total emissions. Recommendation: Establish a sustainable healthcare initiative that assembles experts from research, education, clinical practice, and policy to support Canada’s healthcare sector in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and preventing pollution-related deaths, consistent with healthcare’s mandate to ‘do no harm’ and the timelines and goals of the Paris Agreement, charting a course for zero-emissions healthcare by 2050. Finding: The health of Canadians is at risk due to multiple and varied risks of climate change, including those described in this policy brief (see Figure 1). An ongoing, coordinated, consistent and pan-Canadian effort to track, report, and create healthy change is required. Recommendation: Integrate health considerations into climate-related policymaking across sectors, including in Canada’s updated 2020 Nationally Determined Contribution Commitments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process, and increase ambition to ensure Canada commits to doing its fair share in achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement. Introduction Climate change is the biggest global health threat of the 21st century,1 and tackling it could be our greatest health opportunity.2 “The health of a child born today will be impacted by climate change at every stage in their life. Without significant intervention, this new era will come to define the health of an entire generation.”3 However, another path is possible: a world that meets the ambition of the Paris Agreement and proactively adapts to protect health from the climate impacts we cannot now avoid. This year’s briefing presents key findings and recommendations toward this path. Key messages and recommendations Health and climate change in Canada Imagine an infant born today in Canada. This child enters a country warming at double the global rate, with the average temperature in Canada having increased 1.7oC between 1948-2016.4 The North is warming even faster: areas in the Northwest Territories’ Mackenzie Delta are now 3oC warmer than in 1948.5 Climate-related impacts on health and health systems are already being felt,6 with examples outlined in Figure 1. By the time the child is in their twenties, in all feasible emissions scenarios, Canada will have warmed by at least 1.5oC as compared to a 1986-2005 reference period.4 Two scenarios are possible for the remainder of the child’s life. If GHG emissions continue to rise at the current rate (a situation referred to by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as the “high emissions scenario,” or ‘RCP8.5’) temperature increases in Canada will continue after 2050, reaching 6oC relative to 1986-2005 by the time the child is in their child’s sixties.4 Globally, this degree of warming places populations at a greater risk of wildfires, extreme heat, poor air quality, and weather-related disasters. It will also lead to changes in vector-borne disease, as well as undernutrition, conflict, and migration. These impacts and others negatively impact mental health,3 including via ecological anxiety and grief.8 Climate change will not impact everyone equally, and can widen existing disparities in health outcomes between and within populations, with Indigenous populations, people in low-resource settings,28 and future generations29 disproportionately affected.30 This degree of warming has the potential to disrupt core public health infrastructure and overwhelm health services.2 Alternatively, if global emissions peak soon and quickly fall to net zero, consistent with the IPCC’s low-emissions scenario, (RCP 2.6), temperatures will remain steady from 2040 onwards.4 Measures needed to accomplish this, such as increasing clean energy, improving Figure 1: Examples of impacts of Climate Change on Health and Health Systems in Canada Indicators of climate-related health impacts and adaptation This year’s policy brief presents information on three key indicators of climate-related health impacts and adaptive responses. Additional recommendations can also be found in the 2017 and 2018 policy briefs.6,24 Wildfires Lancet Countdown data indicates that the number of daily population wildfire exposure events increased from an average of 35,300 in 2001-2004 to 54,100 in 2015-2018, not including those subjected to wildfire smoke. Canadian data supports increasing impacts: more than half of the 448,444 Canadians evacuated due to wildfires between 1980-2017 were displaced in the last decade.35 These exposures not only pose a threat to public health, but also result in major economic and social burdens. 2019 marks a crux point for humanity: choices and policies made in the lead up to the 2020 UNFCCC Nationally Determined Contribution submissions will determine whether the world follows the disastrous high-emissions scenario, or the safer low-emissions path. Children are taking to the streets to demand a livable world. It is the task of today’s political leaders and other adults to exert maximal effort within their spheres of influence in order to set a course for a healthy response to climate change. public transit, cycling and walking rates, and adhering to a plantrich diet in accordance with Canada’s new food guide, decrease emissions, and also improve health and decrease healthcare costs.30 Canada is not on track: in 2016, total Canadian GHG emissions were 704 Mt CO2e, an increase of more than 100 Mt since 1990.31 Policies and measures currently under development but not yet implemented are forecast to reduce national emissions to 592 Mt CO2e by 2030,32 79 Mt CO2e above Canada’s 2030 target of 513 MtCO2e 32—a goal which is itself too weak to represent a fair contribution by Canada to the emissions reductions necessary to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The Earth as a whole is warming less quickly than Canada—but still far too fast. The IPCC and the World Health Organization have emphasized that keeping global surface temperature warming to 1.5oC is key to obtaining the best outcomes now possible for human health.33,34 To do so would require global net human-caused emissions to fall by about 45% from 2010 by 2030, reaching ‘net zero’ by 2050.34 Updated Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement are due to be submitted by 2020: policymakers must integrate health considerations through proposed interventions. Figure 2: Number of Wildfire Evacuees in Canada 1980-2017.* Source: Wildland Fire Evacuation Database, Natural Resources Canada.35 (used with permission) *N.B. Reporting for 2017 only includes evacuations up to and including July In a mid-range GHG emissions scenario, wildfires in Canada are projected to rise 75% rise by the end of the 21st century,36 necessitating a strong adaptive response. Human health impacts of fire include death, trauma, and major burns,37 anxiety during wildfire periods,35,38 and post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression related to evacuations.39,40 Wildfire smoke also travels vast distances41 and increases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations, with growing evidence of an association with all-cause mortality.41 Impacts on health systems can be severe: during the Fort McMurray fire hospital staff evacuated 103 patients in a matter of hours,10,42 and the 2017 British Columbia wildfires resulted in 700+ staff displaced, 880 patients evacuated, and 19 sites closed by the Interior Health Authority, at a cost of $2.7 million.12 Such devastating events also generate significant emissions, contributing to climate change, and helping to generate conditions conducive to future blazes.43 Much can be done to lessen the health impacts of wildfires. Qualitative data indicates that populations who are better-briefed on the local evacuation plan, as well as ways to lessen the risk of fire to their property, are not only more prepared but also less anxious.35,38 Building codes can be changed to help keep smoke out, primary care practitioners can ensure vulnerable patients receive at-home air filtration systems and respiratory medications prior to wildfire season,44 public health professionals can collaborate with municipal officials to maximize smoke forecast-informed outdoor and well-ventilated indoor recreation opportunities,38 and health personnel can help ensure evacuation plans are clearly communicated.45 Sustainable and healthy transport since 2000, they account for less than 4% of the energy used in transport (Figure 3). This rate of change is inconsistent with the emissions pathway required to keep today’s and future children safe. Support is therefore required for investments in public transit,47 and cycling infrastructure,48 creating win-wins for health by increasing physical activity levels and improving community cohesion, while reducing chronic disease, healthcare costs and GHG emissions.49,50 Zero emissions vehicles also reduce air pollution and are increasingly affordable: the up-front cost of electric vehicles is forecast to become competitive on an un-subsidized basis from 2024 onwards.51 British Columbia recently passed legislation requiring all new cars sold to be zero-emission by 2040.52 Other provinces would benefit from matching this ambition. Figure 3: Per Capita Fuel Consumption for Transport in Canada. Source: Lancet Countdown Transport-related pollution is harming the health of Canadians. Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution related to land-based transportation was responsible for approximately 1063 deaths in 2015 in Canada, resulting in a loss of economic welfare for Canadians valued at approximately $8 billion dollars.24 Additionally, Canada has the highest pediatric asthma rate amongst countries of comparable income level, with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from traffic responsible for approximately 1 in 5 new cases of asthma in children.46 With transport responsible for 24% of national GHG emissions in 2017,31 decarbonizing this sector must be prioritized. Progress is entirely too slow: total fuel consumption for road transport per capita decreased 5.4% from 2013 to 2016. While per capita use of electricity and biofuels for transport increased by 600% Healthcare sector emissions Though Canadians are proud of the care they provide for one another with this country’s system of universal healthcare,53 Lancet Countdown analysis reveals an area which should give pause to all who endeavor to “do no harm”: Canada’s healthcare system has the world’s third highest emissions per capita. Previous analysis showed healthcare sector emissions to be responsible for 4.6% of the national total,54 as well as more than 200,000 tons of other pollutants, resulting in 23,000 disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost annually.54 Emissions from the health sector represent a strategic mitigation target in a single-payer healthcare system straining under the weight of an inexorably increasing burden of disease. While Canadian healthcare sector emissions are increasing, the world-leading Sustainable Development Unit in England reported an 18.5% decrease in National Health Service, public health and social care system emissions from 2007-2017 despite an increase in clinical activity.55 Despite healthcare being a provincial jurisdiction, there is a role for pan-Canadian sustainability initiatives to unite diverse experts spanning public health and the spectrum of clinical disciplines, economics, sustainability science and beyond. This demands health sector-wide education, consistent with existing efforts to increase environmental literacy for health professionals.56 1. Costello A, Abbas M, Allen A, Ball S, Bell S, Bellamy R, et al. Managing the health effects of climate change: Lancet and University College London Institute for Global Health Commission. Lancet 2009;373(9676):1693-733. 2. Watts N, Amann M, Arnell N, et al. The 2018 report of The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: shaping the health of nations for centuries to come. Lancet 2018; vol. 392: 2479–514. 3. Watts N, Amann M, Arnell N, et al. The 2019 report of The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: ensuring that the health of a child born today is not defined by a changing climate. Lancet 2019; vol. 394: 1836–78. 4. Government of Canada. Canada’s Changing Climate Ottawa, Ontario,; 2019. 5. Government of the Northwest Territories. Climate Observations in the Northwest Territories (1957-2012) Inuvik * Norman Wells * Yellowknife * Fort Smith. 6. Howard C, Rose C, Hancock T. Lancet Countdown 2017 Report: Briefing for Canadian Policymakers. Lancet Countdown and Canadian Public Health Association; 2017 October 31st, 2017. 7. Rosol R, Powell-Hellyer S, Chan HM. Impacts of decline harvest of country food on nutrient intake among Inuit in Arctic Canada: impact of climate change and possible adaptation plan. Int J Circumpolar Health 2016;75(1):31127. 8. Cunsolo A, Ellis N. Ecological grief as a mental health response to climate change-related loss. Nature Climate Change 2018;8:275-81. 9. Yao J, Eyamie J, Henderson SB. Evaluation of a spatially resolved forest fire smoke model for population-based epidemiologic exposure assessment. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol 2016;26(3):233-40. 10. Hampshire G. Hospital heroes get patients to safety during Fort McMurray fire: 17 buses took 105 patients to safety in dramatic evacuation. CBC News. 2016. Available from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/hospital-heroesget- patients-to-safety-during-fort-mcmurray-fire-1.3574416. 11. Kirchmeier-Young M, Zwiers F, Gillett N, Cannon A. Attributing extreme fire risk in Western Canada to human emissions. Climatic Change 2017;144(2):365-79. 12. British Columbia Interior Health Authority. Wildfire Emergency Response 2017. 2018. 13. Kirchmeier-Young M, Gillett N, Zwieres F, Cannon A, Anslow F. Attribution of the Influence of Human-Induced Climate Change on an Extreme Fire Season. Earth’s Future: American Geophysical Union 2018. 14. Alberta Health. Impact of Wildfires on the Mental Health of Fort McMurray Residents: Neurotic Disorders, Daily Physician Visits within an Emergency Department 2015 vs. 2016. Alberta Health, Health Standards, Quality and Performance Division, Analytics and Performance Reporting Branch,; 2016. 15. Teufel B, Diro GT, What K, Mildrad SM, Jeong DI, Ganji A, et al. Investigation of the 2013 Alberta flood from weather and climate perspectives. Climate Dynamics 2017:2881-99. 16. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Alberta Flood 2013: The five people we lost. 2014. Available from: https://www.cbc.ca/calgary/features/albertaflood2013/ alberta-flood-deaths/. 17. United Nurses of Alberta. UNA Calgary office closed, many health facilities affected by southern Alberta flooding. 2013 June 21, 2013. 18. Yusa A, Berry P, J JC, Ogden N, Bonsal B, Stewart R, et al. Climate Change, Drought and Human Health in Canada. Int J Environ Res Public Health 2015;12(7):8359-412. 19. Smoyer-Tomic KE, Klaver JD, Soskolne CL, Spady DW. Health Consequences of Drought on the Canadian Prairies. EcoHealth 2004. 20. Government of Canada Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Impact of Climate Change on Canadian Agriculture. 2015 [Oct 22, 2017]; Available from: http:// www.agr.gc.ca/eng/science-and-innovation/agricultural-practices/agriculture- and-climate/future-outlook/impact-of-climate-change-on-canadian-agriculture/? id=1329321987305 21. Cryderman K. Drought in Western Canada is becoming an agricultural nightmare for farmers. 2018. Available from: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/ canada/alberta/article-drought-in-western-canada-is-becoming-an-agricultural- nightmare-for/. 22. Ziska LH, Makra L, Harry SK, Bruffaerts N, Hendrickx M, Coates F, et al. Temper-ature-related changes in airborne allergenic pollen abundance and seasonality across the northern hemisphere: a retrospective data analysis. Lancet Planet Health 2019;3(3):e124-e31. 23. Nelder MP, Wijayasri S, Russell CN, Johnson KO, Marchand-Austin A, Cronin K, et al. The continued rise of Lyme disease in Ontario, Canada: 2017. Canadian Communicable Disease Review 2018;44(10):231-6. 24. Howard C, Rose C, Rivers N. Lancet Countdown 2018 Report: Briefing for Canadian Policymakers. Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Public Health Association, The Lancet Countdown; 2018 November. 25. a. Regional Public Health Department of Montreal. Epidemiological Investigation Heat Wave Summer 2018 in Montréal - Summary. 2019. b. Vogel MM, Zscheischler J, Wartenburger R, et al. Concurrent 2018 hot extremes across Northern hemisphere due to human-induced climate change. Earth's Future, 2019; vol. 7, 692–703. https://doi.org/10.1029/ 2019EF001189 26. Fenech A. Yes, Mr. Premier, Your Province is Shrinking! 2014 [cited 2019 Sept 20, 2019]; Available from: http://projects.upei.ca/climate/2014/02/16/ yes-mr-premier-your-province-is-shrinking/ 27. Kelleya C, Mohtadib S, Canec M, Seagerc R, Kushnirc Y. Climate change in the Fertile Crescent and implications of the recent Syrian drought. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 2015;112 no 11: 3241–6,. 28. Berry HL, Bowen K, Kjellstrom T. Climate change and mental health: a causal pathways framework. Int J Public Health 2010;55(2):123-32. 29. Walpole SC, Rasanathan K, Campbell-Lendrum D. Natural and unnatural synergies: climate change policy and health equity. Bull World Health Organ 2009;87(10):799-801. 30. Watts N, Adger WN, Agnolucci P, Blackstock J, Byass P, Cai W, et al. Health and climate change: policy responses to protect public health. Lancet 2015;386(10006):1861-914. 31. Government of Canada. Greenhouse Gas Emissions. 2018 [June 13, 2018.]; Available from: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/ services/environmental-indicators/greenhouse-gas-emissions.html 32. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators: Progress Towards Canada’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target. 2019 [Sept 3, 2019]; Available from: https://www.canada. ca/content/dam/eccc/documents/pdf/cesindicators/progress-towards-canada- greenhouse-gas-reduction-target/2019/progress-towards-ghg-emissions- target-en.pdf 33. Ebi K, Campbell-Lendrum D, Wyns A. The 1.5 Health Report--Synthesis on Health and Climate Science in the IPCC SR1.5. 2018 2018. 34. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Global Warming of 1.5C--Summary for Policymakers. 2018 October 8, 2018. 35. Christianson A. Wildland Fire Evacuations in Canada. Natural Resources Canada; 2017. 36. Wotton M, Nock C, Flannigan M. International Journal of Wildland Fire 2010;19(3):253-71. 37. Cameron PA, Mitra B, Fitzgerald M, Scheinkestel CD, Stripp A, Batey C, et al. Black Saturday: the immediate impact of the February 2009 bushfires in Victoria, Australia. Med J Aust 2009;191(1):11-6. 38. Dodd W, Scott P, Howard C, Scott C, Rose C, Cunsolo A, et al. Lived experience of a record wildfire season in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Can J Public Health 2018;109(3):327-37. 39. McDermott BM, Lee EM, Judd M, Gibbon P. Posttraumatic stress disorder and general psychopathology in children and adolescents following a wildfire disaster. Can J Psychiatry 2005;50(3):137-43. 40. Papanikolaou V, Adamis D, Mellon RC, Prodromitis G. Psychological distress following wildfires disaster in a rural part of Greece: a case-control population- based study. Int J Emerg Ment Health 2011;13(1):11-26. 41. Reid CE, Brauer M, Johnston FH, Jerrett M, Balmes JR, Elliott CT. Critical Review of Health Impacts of Wildfire Smoke Exposure. Environ Health Perspect 2016;124(9):1334-43. 42. Matear D. The Fort McMurray, Alberta wildfires: Emergency and recovery management of healthcare services. J Bus Contin Emer Plan 2017;11(2):128- 50. 43. Liu Y, Goodrick S, Heilman W. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildfire–climate interactions. Forest Ecology and Management 2014;317:80- 96. 44. Barn PK, Elliott CT, Allen RW, Kosatsky T, Rideout K, Henderson SB. Portable air cleaners should be at the forefront of the public health response to landscape fire smoke. Environ Health 2016;15(1):116. 45. Maguet S. Public Health Responses to Wildfire Smoke Events. BC Center for Disease Control; 2018. 46. Achakulwisut P, Brauer M, Hystad P, Anenberg SC. Global, national, and urban burdens of paediatric asthma incidence attributable to ambient NO2 pollution: estimates from global datasets. Lancet Planet Health 2019;3(4):e166-e78. 47. Besser LM, Dannenberg AL. Walking to public transit: steps to help meet physical activity recommendations. Am J Prev Med 2005;29(4):273-80. 48. United Kingdom Department of Transport. Value for Money Assessment for Cycling Grants. 2014. 49. Woodcock J, Tainio M, Cheshire J, O’Brien O, Goodman A. Health effects of the London bicycle sharing system: health impact modelling study. BMJ 2014;348:g425. 50. Maizlish N, Woodcock J, Co S, Ostro B, Fanai A, Fairley D. Health cobenefits and transportation-related reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the San Francisco Bay area. Am J Public Health 2013;103(4):703-9. 51. Willett W, Rockstrom J, Loken B, Springmann M, Lang T, Vermeulen S, et al. Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT-Lancet Commission on healthy diets from sustainable food systems. Lancet 2019. 52. Zussman R. Legislation introduced to require all new cars sold in B.C. to be zero-emission by 2040. Global News Online. 2019. Available from: https:// globalnews.ca/news/5152429/legislation-introduced-electric-cars/2019. 53. Thompson N. More Canadians take pride in symbols of the country’s present than its past: survey. 2019. 54. Eckelman MJ, Sherman JD, MacNeill AJ. Life cycle environmental emissions and health damages from the Canadian healthcare system: An economic- environmental-epidemiological analysis. PLoS Med 2018;15(7):e1002623. 55. National Health System Sustainable Development Unit. Reducing the use of natural resources in health and social care 2018 report. 2018. 56. Parkes M, Poland B, Allison A, Cole DC, Culbert I, Gislason MK, et al. In press-Preparing for the future of public health: Ecological determinants of health and the call for an eco-social approach to public health education. Canadian Journal of Public Health 2019. DOI: 10.17269/s41997-019-00263-8. References Organisations and acknowledgements The concept of this brief was developed by the Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change. This brief was written by Courtney Howard, MD; Chris Buse, PhD; Caren Rose, PhD; Andrea MacNeill, MD, MSc; and Margot Parkes, MBChB, MAS, PhD. Review was provided by Owen Adams, PhD; Ian Culbert; and Sandy Buchman, MD. Thanks to Sarah Henderson, PhD; Peter Barry, PhD; Brian Wiens, PhD; Robin Edger, LLB, LLM; Jeff Eyamie, and Ashlee Cunsolo, PhD for their assistance. Contributions and review on behalf of the Lancet Countdown were provided by Jess Beagley and Nick Watts, MBBS. THE LANCET COUNTDOWN The Lancet Countdown: Tracking Progress on Health and Climate Change is an international, multi-disciplinary collaboration that exists to monitor the links between public health and climate change. It brings together 35 academic institutions and UN agencies from every continent, drawing on the expertise of climate scientists, engineers, economists, political scientists, public health professionals, and doctors. Each year, the Lancet Countdown publishes an annual assessment of the state of climate change and human health, seeking to provide decision-makers with access to high-quality evidence-based policy guidance. For the full 2019 assessment, visit www.lancet countdown.org/2019-report . THE CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION The Canadian Medical Association (CMA), formed in Quebec City in 1867, has led some of Canada’s most important health policy changes. As we look to the future, the CMA will focus on advocating for a healthy population and a vibrant profession. THE CANADIAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION The Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA) is a national, independent, non-governmental organization that advances public health education, research, policy and practice in Canada and around the world through the Canadian Journal of Public Health, position statements, discussion documents and other resources.
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