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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


14 records – page 1 of 1.

Clinical practice guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10456
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-19
The Canadian Medical Association will propose deployment strategies to ensure maximum use of clinical practice guidelines by physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-19
The Canadian Medical Association will propose deployment strategies to ensure maximum use of clinical practice guidelines by physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will propose deployment strategies to ensure maximum use of clinical practice guidelines by physicians.
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Integration of clinical practice guidelines with electronic medical records

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10458
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC12-22
The Canadian Medical Association supports the integration of clinical practice guidelines with electronic medical records.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC12-22
The Canadian Medical Association supports the integration of clinical practice guidelines with electronic medical records.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the integration of clinical practice guidelines with electronic medical records.
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Formal mentoring programs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10469
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-58
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-58
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
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Multiple chronic diseases

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10470
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-56
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a curriculum to educate physicians and trainees in managing patients with multiple chronic diseases.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-56
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a curriculum to educate physicians and trainees in managing patients with multiple chronic diseases.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a curriculum to educate physicians and trainees in managing patients with multiple chronic diseases.
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Resource management and financial literacy training

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10471
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-57
The Canadian Medical Association calls for the inclusion of resource management and financial literacy training as part of the medical school curriculum.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-57
The Canadian Medical Association calls for the inclusion of resource management and financial literacy training as part of the medical school curriculum.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for the inclusion of resource management and financial literacy training as part of the medical school curriculum.
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CMA support for fair bargaining processes

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10476
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-77
The Canadian Medical Association will support any provincial/territorial medical association in a court challenge to a refusal by their provincial/territorial government to participate in a fair bargaining process.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-77
The Canadian Medical Association will support any provincial/territorial medical association in a court challenge to a refusal by their provincial/territorial government to participate in a fair bargaining process.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will support any provincial/territorial medical association in a court challenge to a refusal by their provincial/territorial government to participate in a fair bargaining process.
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Transition of resident physicians into practice

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10477
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-67
The Canadian Medical Association supports programs which facilitate the transition of resident physicians into practice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-67
The Canadian Medical Association supports programs which facilitate the transition of resident physicians into practice.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports programs which facilitate the transition of resident physicians into practice.
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Physicians' self-assessment

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10488
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-34
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a physician-created, owned and managed infrastructure to facilitate Canadian physicians' objective self-assessment.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-34
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a physician-created, owned and managed infrastructure to facilitate Canadian physicians' objective self-assessment.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a physician-created, owned and managed infrastructure to facilitate Canadian physicians' objective self-assessment.
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Global health issues

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10493
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-59
The Canadian Medical Association supports efforts to encourage physician awareness of and participation in global health issues throughout their career.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-59
The Canadian Medical Association supports efforts to encourage physician awareness of and participation in global health issues throughout their career.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports efforts to encourage physician awareness of and participation in global health issues throughout their career.
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In-house duty call

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10523
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the six recommendations pertaining to in-house duty call as put forward in a Canadian Association of Internes and Residents’ position paper, “Canadian Patient and Physician Safety and Wellbeing: Resident Duty Hours.”
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the six recommendations pertaining to in-house duty call as put forward in a Canadian Association of Internes and Residents’ position paper, “Canadian Patient and Physician Safety and Wellbeing: Resident Duty Hours.”
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the six recommendations pertaining to in-house duty call as put forward in a Canadian Association of Internes and Residents’ position paper, “Canadian Patient and Physician Safety and Wellbeing: Resident Duty Hours.”
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Vision for e-Prescribing: a joint statement by the Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10670
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-12-08
Topics
Health information and e-health
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-12-08
Topics
Health information and e-health
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
Vision for e-Prescribing: a joint statement by the Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association By 2015, e-prescribing will be the means by which prescriptions are generated for Canadians. Definition e-Prescribing is the secure electronic creation and transmission of a prescription between an authorized prescriber and a patient's pharmacy of choice, using clinical Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and pharmacy management software. Background Health Information Technology (HIT) is an enabler to support clinicians in the delivery of health care services to patients. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) and the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) each have identified e-prescribing as a key tool to deliver better value to patients. The integration of HIT into clinics and health care facilities where physicians and pharmacists provide care is a priority for both associations1. As part of its Health Care Transformation initiative, the CMA highlighted the need to accelerate the introduction of e-prescribing in Canada to make it the main method of prescribing. In its policy on optimal prescribing the CMA noted that one of the key elements was the introduction of electronic prescribing. The CPhA, as part of its Blueprint for Pharmacy Implementation Plan, highlights information and communication technology, which includes e-prescribing, as one of five priority areas. We applaud the ongoing efforts of Canada Health Infoway, provinces and territories to establish Drug Information Systems (DIS) and the supporting infrastructure to enable e-prescribing. We urge governments to maintain e-prescribing as a priority and take additional measures to accelerate their investments in this area. It is our joint position that e-prescribing will improve patient care and safety. e-Prescribing, when integrated with DIS, supports enhanced clinical decision-making, prescribing and medication management, and integrates additional information available at the point of care into the clinical workflow. Principles The following principles should guide our collective efforts to build e-prescribing capability in all jurisdictions: * Patient confidentiality and security must be maintained * Patient choice must be protected * Clinicians must have access to best practice information and drug cost and formulary data * Work processes must be streamlined and e-prescribing systems must be able to integrate with clinical and practice management software and DIS * Guidelines must be in place for data sharing among health professionals and for any other use or disclosure of data * The authenticity and accuracy of the prescription must be verifiable * The process must prevent prescription forgeries and diversion * Pan-Canadian standards must be set for electronic signatures Benefits of e-Prescribing A number of these benefits will be realized when e-prescribing is integrated with jurisdictional Drug Information Systems (DIS). * Patients: o Improves patient safety and overall quality of care o Increases convenience for dispensing of new and refill prescriptions o Supports collaborative, team-based care * Providers: o Supports a safer and more efficient method of prescribing and authorizing refills by replacing outdated phone, fax and paper-based prescriptions o Eliminates re-transcription and decreases risk of errors and liability, as a prescription is written only once at the point-of-care o Supports electronic communications between providers and reduces phone calls and call-backs to/from pharmacies for clarification o Provides Warning and Alert systems at the point of prescribing, supporting clinician response to potential contraindications, drug interactions and allergies o Facilitates informed decision-making by making medication history, drug, therapeutic, formulary and cost information available at the point of prescribing * Health Care System: o Improves efficiency and safety of prescribing, dispensing and monitoring of medication therapy o Supports access to a common, comprehensive medication profile, enhancing clinical decision-making and patient adherence o Increases cost-effective medication use, through improved evidence-based prescribing, formulary adherence, awareness of drug costs and medication management o Improves reporting and drug use evaluation Challenges While evidence of the value of e-prescribing is established in the literature, its existence has not fostered broad implementation and adoption. In Canada, there are a number of common and inter-related challenges to e-prescribing's implementation and adoption. These include: * Improving access to relevant and complete information to support decision-making * Increasing the level of the adoption of technology at the point of care * Focusing on systems-based planning to ensure continuum-wide value * Integrating e-prescribing into work processes to gain support from physicians, pharmacists and other prescribers * Increasing leadership commitment to communicate the need for change, remove barriers and ensure progress * Updating legislation and regulation to support e-prescribing Enabling e-Prescribing in Canada CMA and CPhA believe that we can achieve the vision that is set out in this document and address the aforementioned challenges by working collectively on five fronts: * Health care leadership in all jurisdictions and clinical organizations must commit to make e-prescribing a reality by 2015 * Provinces and territories, with Canada Health Infoway, must complete the building blocks to support e-prescribing by increasing Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption at the point of care, finishing the work on the Drug Information Systems (DIS) in all jurisdictions and building the connectivity among the points of care and the DIS systems * Pharmacist and medical organizations in conjunction with provinces, territories and Canada Health Infoway must identify clear benefits for clinicians (enhancing the effectiveness of care delivery and in efficiencies in changing workflows) to adopt e-prescribing and focus their efforts on achieving these benefits in the next three years * Provinces, territories and regulatory organizations must create a policy/regulatory environment that supports e-prescribing which facilitates the role of clinicians in providing health care to their patients * Provinces and territories must harmonize the business rules and e-health standards to simplify implementation and conformance by software vendors and allow more investment in innovation. 1 Health Care Transformation in Canada, Canadian Medical Association, June 2010; Blueprint for Pharmacy Implementation Plan, Canadian Pharmacists Association, September 2009
Documents
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Confidentiality of medical records

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy598
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1979-06-20
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC79-2
The Canadian Medical Association deplores any action taken by any level of government which threatens confidentiality of medical records.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1979-06-20
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC79-2
The Canadian Medical Association deplores any action taken by any level of government which threatens confidentiality of medical records.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association deplores any action taken by any level of government which threatens confidentiality of medical records.
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CMA's Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance: Amending Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework to provide value to self-employed Canadians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10355
Date
2012-02-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2012-02-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) supports the Government of Canada's efforts to improve Canada's retirement income system, specifically by establishing a legislative framework to permit pooled registered pension plans (PRPPs) as proposed in Bill C-25, the PRPP Act. The CMA has long supported the Government of Canada's efforts to expand access to pensions, including by permitting PRPPs. However, the CMA is concerned that as currently proposed, Bill C-25 limits the potential for PRPPs to expand the access to, and investment in, pensions of self-employed individuals. The CMA has participated in, and made recommendations to, Finance Canada over the course of the department's multi-year consultative process, including responding to the 2010 consultative paper Ensuring the Ongoing Strength of Canada's Retirement Income System. The CMA has also made recommendations to Finance Canada as a member of the Retirement Income Improvement Coalition (RIIC), which consists of 11 national professional associations representing over 1 million self-employed professionals. The following discussion and recommendations align with those previously made by the CMA and the RIIC. The pension framework is a critical issue to CMA's membership of over 76,000 physicians. In addressing the pension framework, including permitting PRPPs, two principles are central to the CMA's membership: to ensure that self-employed Canadians can retire with an appropriate level of retirement income (e.g., a target of 70% of pre-retirement income); and, to expand the retirement savings options that are available to self-employed Canadians. The CMA's comments herein, and recommendations to the Finance Committee to amend Bill C-25, are in support of these two principles. As elaborated below, the CMA encourages the Finance Committee to: 1. Amend Bill C-25 to raise the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs in order to increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals. 2. Amend Section 12(1) of Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework so it includes defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans, which provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contributions plans. 3. Ensure the eligibility clauses of Bill C-25 (Sections 14-26) would allow well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership to be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. 1. Increase the combined contribution limit It is our understanding that the core benefit of the proposed PRPP framework is in providing smaller businesses access to low-cost pension plans, thereby providing a vehicle to encourage employers to establish, and contribute to, pensions for their employees. However, as explained by the Explanatory Notes accompanying the proposed Income Tax Act amendments, "an employer's contributions to an individual's PRPP account [and...] an individual's PRPP contributions in a taxation year will immediately reduce the individual's ability to make deductible RRSP contributions in that same year." While the CMA recognizes the value of, and supports, this objective, this proposal in effect maintains the status quo for self-employed individuals. Like the Canadian population at large, physicians represent an aging demographic - 38% of Canada's physicians are 55 or older - for whom retirement planning is an important concern. In addition, the vast majority of CMA members are self-employed physicians and, as such, they are unable to participate in workplace registered pension plans (RPPs). At present, physicians are more reliant on registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs) relative to other retirement savings vehicles. While individuals with employer contributions stand to benefit from increased retirement savings via employer contributions, self-employed individuals are merely provided with access to an alternate retirement savings vehicle. As explained in the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Researchi, "[h]igher income groups tend to exhibit a greater tendency to substitute one form of saving for another since they tend to be bound by limits...[I]f newly introduced plans are included in limitations imposed on the degree to which contributions may be deductible for tax purposes, saving may not increase for individuals who are constrained (i.e. saving up to their limit), since they would more likely substitute one type of saving for another (e.g., RRSP for a private pension plan)." Therefore, the CMA encourages the Finance Committee to consider amending Bill C-25 to increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals by raising the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs. 2. Include Defined Benefit and Targeted Benefit Pension Plans As currently proposed, Section 12(1) of Bill C-25 limits PRPPs to defined contribution pension plans by specifically excluding from eligibility of registration: (a) a pension plan as defined by 2(1) of the Pension Benefits Standards Act; (b) an employees' or a deferred profit-sharing plan; (c) an RRSP or a retirement compensation arrangement defined by 248(1) of the Income Tax Act; and, (d) any other prescribed plan or arrangement. As highlighted in the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Research, "defined benefit pension funds and annuities enable investors to share longevity risks as well as pool risky investments to diversify risk." By pooling risk, defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contribution plans. The CMA encourages the Finance Committee to amend Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework to include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans. 3. Clarify the eligibility criteria of "PRPP administrators" to include professional associations Further clarification is required on the type of organization that may qualify as a PRPP administrator under Bill C-25. While Sections 14-26 of Bill C-25 can be interpreted to extend administrator eligibility to organizations that are able to fulfill the criteria it establishes, Finance Canada's Framework for Pooled Registered Retirement Plans states that eligibility of administrators would be limited to "regulated financial institutions that are capable of taking on a fiduciary role." The CMA encourages the Finance Committee to ensure that the eligibility clauses of Bill C-25 would allow well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership to be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. Conclusion While the CMA supports the proposed PRPP framework in principle, the limitations currently proposed by Bill C-25 should be addressed to ensure that PRPPs also provide value to self-employed Canadians, including physicians. The CMA appreciates the opportunity to comment to the Finance Committee as part of its study of Bill C-25. Summary of Recommendations Recommendation 1 Amend Bill C-25 to raise the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs in order to increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals. Recommendation 2 Amend Section 12(1) of Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework so it includes defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans, which provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contributions plans. Recommendation 3 Ensure the eligibility clauses of Bill C-25 (Sections 14-26) would allow well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership to be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. i Prepared for the Research Working Group on Retirement Income Adequacy of Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers of Finance.
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CMA's Submission to Finance Canada regarding proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10353
Date
2012-02-14
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2012-02-14
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
As previously indicated in the Retirement Income Improvement Coalition's (RIIC) letter to the Minister of Finance on August 10, 2011, the CMA supports the federal government's proposal to expand access to pensions, specifically by establishing a legislative and regulatory framework to permit pooled registered retirement plans (PRPPs). The CMA is concerned that as currently proposed, the PRPP framework, including Bill C-25 and the proposed legislative amendments to the Income Tax Act, would limit the potential for PRPPs to contribute to expanding access to, and investment in, pensions for self-employed individuals. With respect to the pension framework, a critical issue, two principles are central to the CMA's membership of over 76,000 physicians. These are, to encourage the federal government to: 1) ensure that self-employed Canadians can retire with an appropriate level of retirement income (e.g., a 70% of pre-retirement income target); and, 2) expand the retirement savings options that are available to self-employed Canadians. The CMA's comments herein on the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act are in support of these two principles. As elaborated below, the CMA encourages the federal government to: 1. Increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals by raising the combined limit for RRSPs; 2. Expand the PRPP framework to include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans; and, 3. Clarify the eligibility criteria of "PRPP administrators" to include professional associations. 1. Increase the combined contribution limit for PRPPs and RRSPs As proposed, it is our understanding that the core benefit of the PRPP framework is in providing smaller businesses access to low-cost pension plans, thereby providing a vehicle to encourage employers to establish, and contribute to, pensions for their employees. While the CMA recognizes the value of, and supports, this objective, this proposal in effect maintains the status quo for self-employed individuals. Under Clause 10 of the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act, the contribution limit to PRPPs would be calculated as an additional component of the current registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) contribution limit. As outlined in the Explanatory Notes, "an employer's contributions to an individual's PRPP account [and...] an individual's PRPP contributions in a taxation year will immediately reduce the individual's ability to make deductible RRSP contributions in that same year." While individuals with employer contributions stand to benefit from increased retirement savings via employer contributions, self-employed individuals are merely provided with access to an alternate retirement savings vehicle. As explained in the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Researchi, "[h]igher income groups tend to exhibit a greater tendency to substitute one form of saving for another since they tend to be bound by limits...[I]f newly introduced plans are included in limitations imposed on the degree to which contributions may be deductible for tax purposes, saving may not increase for individuals who are constrained (i.e. saving up to their limit), since they would more likely substitute one type of saving for another (e.g., RRSP for a private pension plan)." Therefore, the CMA encourages the federal government to consider increasing the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals by raising the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs. 2. Include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans As noted under Clause 12, the registration criteria for PRPPs will be established by the PRPP Act, Bill C-25. Of concern, Bill C-25 limits PRPPs to defined contribution pension plans by specifically excluding from eligibility of registration: (a) a pension plan as defined by 2(1) of the Pension Benefits Standards Act; (b) an employees' or a deferred profit sharing plan; (c) an RRSP or a retirement compensation arrangement defined by 248(1) of the Income Tax Act; and, (d) any other prescribed plan or arrangement. As highlighted by the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Research, "defined benefit pension funds and annuities enable investors to share longevity risks as well as pool risky investments to diversify risk." By pooling risk, defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contributions plans. The CMA encourages the federal government to expand the PRPP framework to include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans. While the CMA will advance this recommendation to the House of Commons Finance Committee during its consultation on Bill C-25, we include it as part of this submission as modifications to the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act would be required. 3. Clarify the eligibility criteria of "PRPP administrators" to include professional associations Further clarification is required on the type of organization that may qualify as a PRPP administrator. As noted under Clause 12, an administrator of a PRPP is authorized under the PRPP Act. As Bill C-25, the PRPP Act, is still in the legislative process, the CMA will elaborate on this issue during the formal Parliamentary consultation. However, as it stands, further clarification is required on the eligibility criteria proposed by Bill C-25. While Bill C-25 can be interpreted to extend administrator eligibility to organizations that are able to fulfill the criteria established by the PRPP Act, Finance Canada's Framework for PRPPs states that eligibility of administrators would be limited to "regulated financial institutions that are capable of taking on a fiduciary role". Well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership should be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. Conclusion While the CMA supports the proposed PRPP framework in principle, the proposed limitations to PRPPs should be addressed to ensure that they also provide value to self-employed Canadians, including physicians. The CMA appreciates the opportunity to comment on the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act and to once again advance recommendations to Finance Canada on the PRPP framework. i Prepared for the Research Working Group on Retirement Income Adequacy of Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers of Finance.
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14 records – page 1 of 1.