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Statement to the Canadian panel on violence against women Ottawa -September, 1992

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11956
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
1992-09-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
1992-09-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
The CMA is pleased to have this opportunity to address the Canadian Panel on Violence Against Women. As a professional organization with a leadership role in societal issues affecting health, it is both appropriate and important for the CMA to be actively involved in addressing the problems associated with violence. The extremely high incidence of abuse, the associated severe physical, mental and psychological health problems and the significant role played by physicians in recognizing and caring for victims make this a priority for organized medicine. The CMA has significant experience and expertise in this field. In 1984, the CMA General Council passed a resolution stating: "That Health and Welfare Canada and the Provincial Ministries of Health and Education alert the Canadian public to the existence of family violence, including wife assault, child abuse, and elder abuse, and to the services available which respond to these problems, and that organized medicine (through such vehicles as professional journals, newsletters, conferences and formal medical education) alert the physicians of Canada to the problem and that all physicians learn to recognize the signs of family violence in their daily contact with patients and undertake the care and management of victims using available community resources." (Resolution #84-47) The CMA calls the Panel's attention to four major areas of concern: Recognition and Treatment, Education and Training, Protocol Development and Research. 1. Recognition and Treatment: Recognition includes acknowledging the existence and prevalence of abuse and identifying victims of violence. Violence against women is clearly a health issue and one that should be given a very high priority. Statistics indicate that nearly one in eight Canadian women will be subject to spousal violence in her lifetime and that one in five will be a victim of sexual assault. Violence against women is a major determinant of both short -and long-term health problems including traumatic injury, physical and psychological illnesses, alcohol/drug addiction and death. Furthermore, although it is critically important to recognize that abuse crosses all racial and socio-economic boundaries, there are strong indications that certain groups are particularly vulnerable to abusive acts (e.g., pregnant, disabled and elderly women). Recognition includes acknowledging and understanding the social context within which violence occurs. Violence is not an isolated phenomenon, but is part of the much broader issue of societal abuse of women. Physicians are often the first point of contact for patients who have been abused physically, sexually, mentally and/or psychologically. They have a vital role to play in identifying victims and providing treatment and supportive intervention including appropriate referral. Abuse is not always readily apparent, however, and may go undetected for extended periods of time. Numerous studies have shown that both physicians and patients often fail to identify abuse as an underlying cause of symptoms. Such delays can result in devastating and sometimes fatal consequences for patients. Even in those cases where abuse is apparent, both physicians and patients often feel uncomfortable talking openly about the abuse and the circumstances surrounding it. It is the physician's role and responsibility to create a safe and supportive environment for the disclosure and discussion of abuse. Furthermore, the lack of resources for support services or the lack of awareness of what services are available to provide immediate and follow-up care to patients in need may discourage physicians from acknowledging the existence of abuse and identifying victims. It is clear that improvement in the ability and the degree to which victims of abuse are recognized and given appropriate assistance by physicians and other caring professionals in a non-threatening environment is urgently required. Individuals who are abused usually approach the health care system through primary contact with emergency departments or other primary care centres. The care available in such settings is acute, fragmented and episodic. Such settings are not appropriate for the victims of violence. The challenge that we, as physicians, recognize is to be able to provide access in a coordinated way to medical, social, legal and other support services that are essential for the victim of violence. This integration of services is essential at the point of initial recognition and contact. The CMA has been involved with eight other organizations in the Interdisciplinary Project on Domestic Violence (IPVD), the primary goal of which is to promote interdisciplinary co-operation in the recognition and management of domestic violence. 2. Education and Training: The spectrum of abuse is complex; the victims are diverse; expertise in the field is developing. The current system of medical education neither provides health care personnel with the knowledge or skills nor does it foster the attitude to deal adequately with this issue. Some of CMA's divisions have played an active role in this area. For instance, the Ontario Medical Association has developed curriculum guidelines and medical management of wife abuse for undergraduate medical students. It is ,important that there be more involvement by relevant medical groups in developing educational and training programs and more commitment from medical educators to integrate these programs and resources into the curriculum. Programs must be developed and instituted at all levels of medical education in order that physicians can gain the requisite knowledge and skills and be sensitive to the diversity of victims of violence. The CMA believes that the educational programs must result in: 1) understanding of the health consequences of violence; 2) development of effective communication skills; and, 3) understanding of the social context in which violence occurs. Understanding of the social context in which violence occurs will require an examination of the values and attitudes that persist in our society, including a close consideration of the concepts of gender role socialization, sexuality and power. This is required in order to dispel the pervasive societal misconceptions held by physicians and others which act as barriers to an effective and supportive medical response to patients suffering the effects of violence. 3. Development of Protocols: The CMA recognizes the need for more effective management and treatment of the spectrum of problems associated with violence against women. Health care facilities, professional organizations and other relevant groups are challenged to formulate educational and policy protocols for integrated and collaborative approaches to dealing with prevention of abuse and the management of victims of violence. The CMA and a number of its divisions have been active in this area:
In 1985, the CMA prepared and published Family Violence: Guidelines for Recognition and Management (Ghent, W.R., Da Sylva, N.P., Farren, M.E.), which dealt with the signs and symptoms, assessment and management, referral assistance and medical records with respect to wife battering, child abuse and abuse of the elderly;
The Ontario Medical Association published Repons on Wife Assault in January 1991. This document, endorsed by the CMA, examines the problem of wife assault from a medical perspective and outlines approaches to treatment of the male batterer and his family;
The Medical Society of Nova Scotia has developed a handbook entitled Wife Abuse: A Handbook for Physicians, advising on the identification and management of cases involving the battering of women;
The New Brunswick Medical Society has produced a series of discussion papers on violence and in conjunction with that province's Advisory Council on the Status of Women, has produced a graphic poster depicting physical assault on pregnant women as a way of urging physicians to be alert for signs of violence against women; The Medical Society of Prince Edward Island has worked cooperatively with the provincial Department of Health and Social Services and the Interministerial Committee on Family Violence to produce a document entitled Domestic Violence: A Handbook for Physicians. The CMA encourages continued involvement by the medical profession in the development of initiatives such as these and welcomes the opportunity to work in collaboration with other professionals involved in this area. 4. Research The CMA has identified violence against women as a priority health issue. Like rriany other areas in women's health, there is a need for research focusing on all aspects of violence and the associated problems. More specifically, the CMA maintains that there should be more research on the incidence of abuse (particularly as it relates to particular groups), on ways to facilitate the disclosure by victims of abuse and on the effectiveness of educational and prevention programs. The CMA recognizes that the medical profession must show a greater commitment to ending abuse of women and providing more appropriate care and support services to those who are victims of violence. The CMA possesses unique skills and expertise in this area and welcomes the opportunity to work with the Panel on this challenging social and health problem.
Documents
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Principles for providing information about prescription drugs to consumers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy189
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
Principles For Providing Information About Prescription Drugs To Consumers Approved by the CMA Board of Directors, March 2003 Since the late 1990's expenditures on direct to consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs in the United States have increased many-fold. Though U.S.-style DTCA is not legal in Canada1, it reaches Canadians through cross-border transmission of print and broadcast media, and through the Internet. It is believed to have affected drug sales and patient behaviour in Canada. Other therapeutic products, such as vaccines and diagnostic tests, are also being marketed directly to the public. Proponents of DTCA argue that they are providing consumers with much-needed information on drugs and the conditions they treat. Others argue that the underlying intent of such advertising is to increase revenue or market share, and that it therefore cannot be interpreted as unbiased information. The CMA believes that consumers have a right to accurate information on prescription medications and other therapeutic interventions, to enable them to make informed decisions about their own health. This information is especially necessary as more and more Canadians live with chronic conditions, and as we anticipate the availability of new products that may accompany the "biological revolution", e.g. gene therapies. The CMA recommends a review of current mechanisms, including mass media communications, for providing this information to the public. CMA believes that consumer information on prescription drugs should be provided according to the following principles. 2 Principle #1: The Goal is Good Health The ultimate measure of the effectiveness of consumer drug information should be its impact on the health and well-being of Canadians and the quality of health care. Principle #2: Ready Access Canadians should have ready access to credible, high-quality information about prescription drugs. The primary purpose of this information should be education; sales of drugs must not be a concern to the originator. Principle #3: Patient Involvement Consumer drug information should help Canadians make informed decisions regarding management of their health, and facilitate informed discussion with their physicians and other health professionals. CMA encourages Canadians to become educated about their own health and health care, and to appraise health information critically. Principle #4: Evidence-Based Content Consumer drug information should be evidence based, using generally accepted prescribing guidelines as a source where available. Principle #5: Appropriate Information Consumer drug information should be based as much as possible on drug classes and use of generic names; if discussing brand-name drugs the discussion should not be limited to a single specific brand, and brand names should always be preceded by generic names. It should provide information on the following: * indications for use of the drug * contraindications * side effects * relative cost. In addition, consumer drug information should discuss the drug in the context of overall management of the condition for which it is indicated (for example, information about other therapies, lifestyle management and coping strategies). Principle #6: Objectivity of Information Sources Consumer drug information should be provided in such a way as to minimize the impact of vested commercial interests on the information content. Possible sources include health care providers, or independent research agencies. Pharmaceutical manufacturers and patient or consumer groups can be valuable partners in this process but must not be the sole providers of information. Federal and provincial/territorial governments should provide appropriate sustaining support for the development and maintenance of up-to-date consumer drug information. Principle #7: Endorsement/ Accreditation Consumer drug information should be endorsed or accredited by a reputable and unbiased body. Information that is provided to the public through mass media channels should be pre-cleared by an independent board. Principle #8: Monitoring and Revision Consumer drug information should be continually monitored to ensure that it correctly reflects current evidence, and updated when research findings dictate. Principle #9: Physicians as Partners Consumer drug information should support and encourage open patient-physician communication, so that the resulting plan of care, including drug therapy, is mutually satisfactory. Physicians play a vital role in working with patients and other health-care providers to achieve optimal drug therapy, not only through writing prescriptions but through discussing proposed drugs and their use in the context of the overall management of the patient's condition. In addition, physicians and other health care providers, and their associations, can play a valuable part in disseminating drug and other health information to the public. Principle #10: Research and Evaluation Ongoing research should be conducted into the impact of drug information and DTCA on the health care system, with particular emphasis on its effect on appropriateness of prescribing, and on health outcomes. 1 DTCA is not legal in Canada, except for notification of price, quantity and the name of the drug. However, "information-seeking" advertisements for prescription drugs, which may provide the name of the drug without mentioning its indications, or announce that treatments are available for specific indications without mentioning drugs by name, have appeared in Canadian mass media. 2 Though the paper applies primarily to prescription drug information, its principles are also applicable to health information in general.
Documents
Less detail

Strengthening public health system

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy101
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-10
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to develop a plan to respond to the National Advisory Committee on SARS and Public Health recommendations in order to create a strong and well-resourced public health system with adequate surge capacity and sufficient highly qualified public health professionals.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-10
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to develop a plan to respond to the National Advisory Committee on SARS and Public Health recommendations in order to create a strong and well-resourced public health system with adequate surge capacity and sufficient highly qualified public health professionals.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to develop a plan to respond to the National Advisory Committee on SARS and Public Health recommendations in order to create a strong and well-resourced public health system with adequate surge capacity and sufficient highly qualified public health professionals.
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Health status of Canadians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy102
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-11
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to commit to the goal of establishing Canada as the top country worldwide, regarding the health status of its citizens, within ten years.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-11
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to commit to the goal of establishing Canada as the top country worldwide, regarding the health status of its citizens, within ten years.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to commit to the goal of establishing Canada as the top country worldwide, regarding the health status of its citizens, within ten years.
Less detail

Primary care renewal

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy110
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC03-23
That Canadian Medical Association strongly advocate to federal/provincial/territorial governments and their agents that any new policy on primary care renewal/reform be based on evidence from valid studies that are formally, independently and objectively evaluated through pilot projects.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC03-23
That Canadian Medical Association strongly advocate to federal/provincial/territorial governments and their agents that any new policy on primary care renewal/reform be based on evidence from valid studies that are formally, independently and objectively evaluated through pilot projects.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association strongly advocate to federal/provincial/territorial governments and their agents that any new policy on primary care renewal/reform be based on evidence from valid studies that are formally, independently and objectively evaluated through pilot projects.
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Tax allocation for medicare

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy111
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC03-24
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to segregate a specific tax allocation from the Consolidated Revenue Fund to fund medicare as defined in the Canada Health Act, and that these funds be transferred to the provinces and territories to assure predictability, sustainability and accountability for medical services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC03-24
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to segregate a specific tax allocation from the Consolidated Revenue Fund to fund medicare as defined in the Canada Health Act, and that these funds be transferred to the provinces and territories to assure predictability, sustainability and accountability for medical services.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association call on the federal government to segregate a specific tax allocation from the Consolidated Revenue Fund to fund medicare as defined in the Canada Health Act, and that these funds be transferred to the provinces and territories to assure predictability, sustainability and accountability for medical services.
Less detail

Primary care renewal

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy114
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC03-27
That Canadian Medical Association encourage proper evaluation of primary care renewal to ensure that the renewal is improving access and health care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC03-27
That Canadian Medical Association encourage proper evaluation of primary care renewal to ensure that the renewal is improving access and health care.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association encourage proper evaluation of primary care renewal to ensure that the renewal is improving access and health care.
Less detail

Resources for health emergencies

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy115
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC03-28
That Canadian Medical Association urge governments at all levels to ensure adequate investments in the human infrastructure and training resources needed to maintain an effective, co-ordinated system for detecting and preventing and responding to health emergencies.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC03-28
That Canadian Medical Association urge governments at all levels to ensure adequate investments in the human infrastructure and training resources needed to maintain an effective, co-ordinated system for detecting and preventing and responding to health emergencies.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association urge governments at all levels to ensure adequate investments in the human infrastructure and training resources needed to maintain an effective, co-ordinated system for detecting and preventing and responding to health emergencies.
Less detail

Recruitment to general specialty training

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy116
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-29
That Canadian Medical Association, with the relevant national medical associations, study the reduced enrollment in the general specialty training programs (family medicine, general surgery, general obstetrics and gynecology, general internal medicine and general pediatrics) and propose strategies to reverse this trend.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-29
That Canadian Medical Association, with the relevant national medical associations, study the reduced enrollment in the general specialty training programs (family medicine, general surgery, general obstetrics and gynecology, general internal medicine and general pediatrics) and propose strategies to reverse this trend.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association, with the relevant national medical associations, study the reduced enrollment in the general specialty training programs (family medicine, general surgery, general obstetrics and gynecology, general internal medicine and general pediatrics) and propose strategies to reverse this trend.
Less detail

National locum licence

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy120
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-65
That Canadian Medical Association and the Divisions work with the Federation of Medical Licensing Authorities of Canada and the provincial/territorial licensing bodies to develop a national locum licence.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-65
That Canadian Medical Association and the Divisions work with the Federation of Medical Licensing Authorities of Canada and the provincial/territorial licensing bodies to develop a national locum licence.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association and the Divisions work with the Federation of Medical Licensing Authorities of Canada and the provincial/territorial licensing bodies to develop a national locum licence.
Less detail

Physician stress and burnout

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy123
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-68
That Canadian Medical Association work with divisions, affiliates and other stakeholders, through the Canadian Medical Association Centre for Physician Health and Well-Being, to address issues of physician stress and burn-out.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-68
That Canadian Medical Association work with divisions, affiliates and other stakeholders, through the Canadian Medical Association Centre for Physician Health and Well-Being, to address issues of physician stress and burn-out.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association work with divisions, affiliates and other stakeholders, through the Canadian Medical Association Centre for Physician Health and Well-Being, to address issues of physician stress and burn-out.
Less detail

Shortage of primary care physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy124
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-69
That Canadian Medical Association in its strategic planning process identify as a priority the crisis in primary medical care delivery and study the ongoing loss of physicians providing comprehensive primary medical care and develop a strategy to reverse this pattern.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-69
That Canadian Medical Association in its strategic planning process identify as a priority the crisis in primary medical care delivery and study the ongoing loss of physicians providing comprehensive primary medical care and develop a strategy to reverse this pattern.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association in its strategic planning process identify as a priority the crisis in primary medical care delivery and study the ongoing loss of physicians providing comprehensive primary medical care and develop a strategy to reverse this pattern.
Less detail

Smoking cessation in hospitals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy129
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-31
That Canadian Medical Association call upon the provincial and territorial governments to provide resources for every hospital to offer smoking cessation, counseling support including medication to every smoking patient in hospital and as needed after discharge.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-31
That Canadian Medical Association call upon the provincial and territorial governments to provide resources for every hospital to offer smoking cessation, counseling support including medication to every smoking patient in hospital and as needed after discharge.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association call upon the provincial and territorial governments to provide resources for every hospital to offer smoking cessation, counseling support including medication to every smoking patient in hospital and as needed after discharge.
Less detail

Driver education and testing

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy130
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-32
That Canadian Medical Association demand that provincial and territorial governments develop a program including improved driver education, expanded driver testing requirements and differential licensing to address many injuries and deaths caused by motor vehicle decisions in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-32
That Canadian Medical Association demand that provincial and territorial governments develop a program including improved driver education, expanded driver testing requirements and differential licensing to address many injuries and deaths caused by motor vehicle decisions in Canada.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association demand that provincial and territorial governments develop a program including improved driver education, expanded driver testing requirements and differential licensing to address many injuries and deaths caused by motor vehicle decisions in Canada.
Less detail

Annual meetings and bans on smoking

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy131
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-33
That beginning once current contractual commitments are honored, Canadian Medical Association in keeping with its vision of a healthy Canadian population, hold its annual meeting only in those jurisdictions where legislation ensures a 100% ban on smoking in indoor public places.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-33
That beginning once current contractual commitments are honored, Canadian Medical Association in keeping with its vision of a healthy Canadian population, hold its annual meeting only in those jurisdictions where legislation ensures a 100% ban on smoking in indoor public places.
Text
That beginning once current contractual commitments are honored, Canadian Medical Association in keeping with its vision of a healthy Canadian population, hold its annual meeting only in those jurisdictions where legislation ensures a 100% ban on smoking in indoor public places.
Less detail

Needs of retired physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy135
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-37
That Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with the divisions, address specific needs of retired physicians in the Canadian Medical Association's physician health and well-being program.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC03-37
That Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with the divisions, address specific needs of retired physicians in the Canadian Medical Association's physician health and well-being program.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with the divisions, address specific needs of retired physicians in the Canadian Medical Association's physician health and well-being program.
Less detail

Compensating clinical physicians who teach

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy141
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC03-43
That Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates ask Canadian universities and governments to accurately document and appropriately compensate clinical physicians who are teaching, in recognition of their substantial contribution to the professional education of physicians in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC03-43
That Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates ask Canadian universities and governments to accurately document and appropriately compensate clinical physicians who are teaching, in recognition of their substantial contribution to the professional education of physicians in Canada.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association and its divisions and affiliates ask Canadian universities and governments to accurately document and appropriately compensate clinical physicians who are teaching, in recognition of their substantial contribution to the professional education of physicians in Canada.
Less detail

Joint statement on scopes of practice

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy219
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Health human resources
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-03-01
Topics
Health human resources
Text
Joint Statement on Scopes of Practice (February 2003) Canada's physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other health professionals recognize that a sustainable health workforce is a key challenge facing our health care system. In this regard, scopes of practice is an important issue that needs to be addressed. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA), the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) and the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA) have approved the following principles and criteria for the determination of scopes of practice. The primary purposes of such determinations are to meet the health care needs of Canadians, and to serve the interests of patients and the public safely, efficiently and competently. The CPhA, CNA and CMA believe that policy decisions taken in this area must put patients first. Secondly, they should be grounded in principles that reflect our commitment to professionalism, lifelong learning and patient safety. Thirdly, that there be recognition of the need for legislative and regulatory changes to support evolving scopes of practice. Moreover, we believe that health professionals must be involved in decision-making processes in this area. Principles Focus: Scopes of practice statements should promote safe, ethical, high-quality care that responds to the needs of patients and the public in a timely manner, is affordable and is provided by competent health care providers. Flexibility: A flexible approach is required that enables providers to practise to the extent of their education, training, skills, knowledge, experience, competence and judgment while being responsive to the needs of patients and the public. Collaboration and cooperation: In order to support interdisciplinary approaches to patient care and good health outcomes, physicians, nurses and pharmacists engage in collaborative and cooperative practice with other health care providers who are qualified and appropriately trained and who use, wherever possible, an evidence-based approach. Good communication is essential to collaboration and cooperation. Coordination: A qualified health care provider should coordinate individual patient care. Patient choice: Scopes of practice should take into account patients' choice of health care provider. Criteria Accountability: Scopes of practice should reflect the degree of accountability, responsibility and authority that the health care provider assumes for the outcome of his or her practice. Education: Scopes of practice should reflect the breadth, depth and relevance of the training and education of the health care provider. This includes consideration of the extent of the accredited or approved educational program(s), certification of the provider and maintenance of competency. Competencies and practice standards: Scopes of practice should reflect the degree of knowledge, values, attitudes and skills (i.e., clinical expertise and judgement, critical thinking, analysis, problem solving, decision making, leadership) of the provider group. Quality assurance and improvement: Scopes of practice should reflect measures of quality assurance and improvement that have been implemented for the protection of patients and the public. Risk assessment: Scopes of practice should take into consideration risk to patients. Evidence-based practices: Scopes of practice should reflect the degree to which the provider group practices are based on valid scientific evidence where available. Setting and culture: Scopes of practice should be sensitive to the place, context and culture in which the practice occurs. Legal liability and insurance: Scopes of practice should reflect case law and the legal liability assumed by the health care provider including mutual professional malpractice protection or liability insurance coverage. Regulation: Scopes of practice should reflect the legislative and regulatory authority, where applicable, of the health care provider. Principles and criteria to ensure safe, competent and ethical patient care should guide the development of scopes of practice of health care providers. This document is based on a January 2002 policy developed by the Canadian Medical Association whicb has been endorsed by the Canadian Nurses Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association. We welcome the support of other health care providers for these principles and criteria regarding scopes of practice.
Documents
Less detail

Compensation for adverse effects from smallpox vaccination

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy311
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-06-01
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD03-05-148 - That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal, provincial and territorial governments to ensure appropriate compensation for front-line health care and emergency workers or their family members who volunteer to accept smallpox vaccination and subsequently experience associated illness or financial harm.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-06-01
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD03-05-148 - That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal, provincial and territorial governments to ensure appropriate compensation for front-line health care and emergency workers or their family members who volunteer to accept smallpox vaccination and subsequently experience associated illness or financial harm.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association urge the federal, provincial and territorial governments to ensure appropriate compensation for front-line health care and emergency workers or their family members who volunteer to accept smallpox vaccination and subsequently experience associated illness or financial harm.
Less detail

License of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy516
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-08-19
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC92-09
That the Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing that the provincial/territorial licensing authorities have the ultimate authority regarding licensure requirements in their respective jurisdictions, wishes to reaffirm the principle that any rights and privileges that will be accorded to holders of the revised License of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC) should be conferred on all physicians who completed their LMCC prior to the new requirements, including portability of eligibility for licensure.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-08-19
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC92-09
That the Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing that the provincial/territorial licensing authorities have the ultimate authority regarding licensure requirements in their respective jurisdictions, wishes to reaffirm the principle that any rights and privileges that will be accorded to holders of the revised License of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC) should be conferred on all physicians who completed their LMCC prior to the new requirements, including portability of eligibility for licensure.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing that the provincial/territorial licensing authorities have the ultimate authority regarding licensure requirements in their respective jurisdictions, wishes to reaffirm the principle that any rights and privileges that will be accorded to holders of the revised License of the Medical Council of Canada (LMCC) should be conferred on all physicians who completed their LMCC prior to the new requirements, including portability of eligibility for licensure.
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