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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


58 records – page 1 of 3.

Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-02-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
BD08-04-115
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing with the understanding that routine testing is conducted within the context of the doctor/patient relationship and that clinically appropriate pre- and post-test counselling is conducted.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-02-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
BD08-04-115
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing with the understanding that routine testing is conducted within the context of the doctor/patient relationship and that clinically appropriate pre- and post-test counselling is conducted.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing with the understanding that routine testing is conducted within the context of the doctor/patient relationship and that clinically appropriate pre- and post-test counselling is conducted.
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Vaccination of children

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9236
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-68
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations request governments to promote the vaccination of children where falling rates are threatening public health.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-68
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations request governments to promote the vaccination of children where falling rates are threatening public health.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations request governments to promote the vaccination of children where falling rates are threatening public health.
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Jordan's Principle

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9237
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-69
The Canadian Medical Association supports Jordan's Principle which states that where government services are available to Canadian children and a jurisdictional dispute arises around the cost of the services for Status First Nations and Inuit Indian children, the government of first contact pays the cost then resolves the jurisdictional dispute later.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-69
The Canadian Medical Association supports Jordan's Principle which states that where government services are available to Canadian children and a jurisdictional dispute arises around the cost of the services for Status First Nations and Inuit Indian children, the government of first contact pays the cost then resolves the jurisdictional dispute later.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports Jordan's Principle which states that where government services are available to Canadian children and a jurisdictional dispute arises around the cost of the services for Status First Nations and Inuit Indian children, the government of first contact pays the cost then resolves the jurisdictional dispute later.
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National standards for ambient air quality

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9252
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-82
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to adopt national standards for ambient air quality that are at least as stringent as the leading international standard.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-82
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to adopt national standards for ambient air quality that are at least as stringent as the leading international standard.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to adopt national standards for ambient air quality that are at least as stringent as the leading international standard.
Less detail

Exposure to air pollution

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9253
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-83
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to support research to understand the relationship between early childhood exposure to air pollution and long-term health effects that may occur as a result of this exposure.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC08-83
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to support research to understand the relationship between early childhood exposure to air pollution and long-term health effects that may occur as a result of this exposure.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to support research to understand the relationship between early childhood exposure to air pollution and long-term health effects that may occur as a result of this exposure.
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Endorsement - Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9337
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-05-27
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD08-05-167
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2015-02-28
Date
2008-05-27
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD08-05-167
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the Canadian Patient Safety Institute’s Canadian Disclosure Guidelines
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Hospital privileges for family physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy535
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-03-14
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD81-03-74
That the Canadian Medical Association recommends that hospital privileges for family physicians should be dependent on licensure by the provincial medical licensing bodies and should not be restricted to those physicians holding certification from the College of Family Physicians of Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-03-14
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD81-03-74
That the Canadian Medical Association recommends that hospital privileges for family physicians should be dependent on licensure by the provincial medical licensing bodies and should not be restricted to those physicians holding certification from the College of Family Physicians of Canada.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association recommends that hospital privileges for family physicians should be dependent on licensure by the provincial medical licensing bodies and should not be restricted to those physicians holding certification from the College of Family Physicians of Canada.
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Physician manpower

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy702
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC77-2
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC77-2
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
Text
Whereas the subject of physician manpower is one of major concern and importance to the profession and the governments in Canada, and Whereas it is essential that the profession have major input to the policies developed in this regard Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors ensure that the appropriate body in the Canadian Medical Association continues to examine this subject of physician manpower, develops expertise in it, and provides advice to the board of directors in relation to it, on an ongoing basis.
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Medical direction and administrative responsibility

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy703
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC81-17
That the following be adopted as Canadian Medical Association policy: Medical direction and administrative responsibility: a) service departments which carry out prescribed medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy in hospitals or clinics must have a medical director who is accountable to the hospital board through the hospital administrator and professionally accountable through the normal channels to the organized medical staff. Such medical service departments include medical laboratory services, radiological services, respiratory technology, physiotherapy and nuclear medicine services. The appointment of a medical director for each such service department is essential in order to ensure the best possible service to the patient and to the hospital and to coordinate the related medical programs for the patient, b) the size and complexity of some service departments which carry out medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy may require the appointment of administrative assistants to the medical director, and these may be trained in the disciplines of physiotherapy, radiography, medical laboratory technology, respiratory technology, nuclear medicine technology, etc. They should be responsible to the medical director of the hospital services department and should not be head of the department reporting directly to the hospital administrator. In the small centres where there is not a full-time medical specialist on the medical staff the medical director of the service department should be a qualified physician. Such a non- specialized medical director should establish regular communication with a specialist in the field who may be consulted on general and specific questions, c) it is also recognized that some allied health personnel working in service departments have advanced technical and/or treatment skills. These should be recognized and profitably utilized always under the supervision and accountability of the medical director of the specific service.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC81-17
That the following be adopted as Canadian Medical Association policy: Medical direction and administrative responsibility: a) service departments which carry out prescribed medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy in hospitals or clinics must have a medical director who is accountable to the hospital board through the hospital administrator and professionally accountable through the normal channels to the organized medical staff. Such medical service departments include medical laboratory services, radiological services, respiratory technology, physiotherapy and nuclear medicine services. The appointment of a medical director for each such service department is essential in order to ensure the best possible service to the patient and to the hospital and to coordinate the related medical programs for the patient, b) the size and complexity of some service departments which carry out medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy may require the appointment of administrative assistants to the medical director, and these may be trained in the disciplines of physiotherapy, radiography, medical laboratory technology, respiratory technology, nuclear medicine technology, etc. They should be responsible to the medical director of the hospital services department and should not be head of the department reporting directly to the hospital administrator. In the small centres where there is not a full-time medical specialist on the medical staff the medical director of the service department should be a qualified physician. Such a non- specialized medical director should establish regular communication with a specialist in the field who may be consulted on general and specific questions, c) it is also recognized that some allied health personnel working in service departments have advanced technical and/or treatment skills. These should be recognized and profitably utilized always under the supervision and accountability of the medical director of the specific service.
Text
That the following be adopted as Canadian Medical Association policy: Medical direction and administrative responsibility: a) service departments which carry out prescribed medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy in hospitals or clinics must have a medical director who is accountable to the hospital board through the hospital administrator and professionally accountable through the normal channels to the organized medical staff. Such medical service departments include medical laboratory services, radiological services, respiratory technology, physiotherapy and nuclear medicine services. The appointment of a medical director for each such service department is essential in order to ensure the best possible service to the patient and to the hospital and to coordinate the related medical programs for the patient, b) the size and complexity of some service departments which carry out medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy may require the appointment of administrative assistants to the medical director, and these may be trained in the disciplines of physiotherapy, radiography, medical laboratory technology, respiratory technology, nuclear medicine technology, etc. They should be responsible to the medical director of the hospital services department and should not be head of the department reporting directly to the hospital administrator. In the small centres where there is not a full-time medical specialist on the medical staff the medical director of the service department should be a qualified physician. Such a non- specialized medical director should establish regular communication with a specialist in the field who may be consulted on general and specific questions, c) it is also recognized that some allied health personnel working in service departments have advanced technical and/or treatment skills. These should be recognized and profitably utilized always under the supervision and accountability of the medical director of the specific service.
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Physician availability and practice information

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy704
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC81-47
That the Canadian Medical Association recommend to the divisions that they study methods for making available to the public, information concerning physician availability and nature of practice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Health human resources
Resolution
GC81-47
That the Canadian Medical Association recommend to the divisions that they study methods for making available to the public, information concerning physician availability and nature of practice.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association recommend to the divisions that they study methods for making available to the public, information concerning physician availability and nature of practice.
Less detail
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC77-27
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage programs to promote fluoridation of communal water supplies.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1977-06-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC77-27
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage programs to promote fluoridation of communal water supplies.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association encourage programs to promote fluoridation of communal water supplies.
Less detail
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC81-39
That the Canadian Medical Association strongly support the value of breast feeding, and that suggestions be made to the manufacturers of infant formulas that their advertising should reflect the supplemental nature of their product rather than a replacement for mother's milk.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC81-39
That the Canadian Medical Association strongly support the value of breast feeding, and that suggestions be made to the manufacturers of infant formulas that their advertising should reflect the supplemental nature of their product rather than a replacement for mother's milk.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association strongly support the value of breast feeding, and that suggestions be made to the manufacturers of infant formulas that their advertising should reflect the supplemental nature of their product rather than a replacement for mother's milk.
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Infant formula

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy798
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC81-40
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse a ban on the free supply of infant formula to hospitals.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC81-40
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse a ban on the free supply of infant formula to hospitals.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse a ban on the free supply of infant formula to hospitals.
Less detail

Home and community care services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9245
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC08-49
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations will work with provincial/territorial governments to support the creation of integrated service delivery systems for home and community care services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC08-49
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations will work with provincial/territorial governments to support the creation of integrated service delivery systems for home and community care services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations will work with provincial/territorial governments to support the creation of integrated service delivery systems for home and community care services.
Less detail

Infant formula

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1329
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
1981-12-05
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD82-03-56
That the CMA endorse a ban on the free supply of infant formula to hospitals.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
1981-12-05
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD82-03-56
That the CMA endorse a ban on the free supply of infant formula to hospitals.
Text
That the CMA endorse a ban on the free supply of infant formula to hospitals.
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Caring in a Crisis: The Ethical Obligations of Physicians and Society During a Pandemic

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9109
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-02-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-02-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
Inherent in all health care professional Codes of Ethics is the duty to provide care to patients and to relieve suffering whenever possible. However, this duty does not exist in a vacuum, and depends on the provision of goods and services referred to as reciprocal obligations, which must be provided by governments, health care institutions and other relevant bodies and agencies. The obligation of government and society to physicians can be seen as comparable to the obligations of physicians to their patients. The recent experience of Canadian physicians during the SARS epidemic in Toronto has heightened the sensitivities of the medical profession to several issues that arose during the course of dealing with that illness. Many of the lessons learned (and the unanswered questions that arose) also apply to the looming threat of an avian flu (or other) pandemic. Canadian physicians may be in a relatively unique position to consider these issues given their experience and insight. The intent of this working paper is to highlight the ethical issues of greatest concern to practicing Canadian physicians which must be considered during a pandemic. In order to address these issues before they arise, the CMA presents this paper for consideration by individual physicians, physician organizations, governments, policy makers and interested bodies and stakeholders. Although many of the principles and concepts could readily be applied to other health care workers, the focus of this paper will be on physicians. Policies regarding physicians in training, including medical students and residents, should be clarified in advance by the relevant bodies involved in their oversight and training. Issues of concern would include the responsibilities of trainees to provide care during a pandemic and the potential effect of such an outbreak on their education and training. A. Physician obligations during a pandemic The professional obligations of physicians are well spelled out in the CMA Code of Ethics and other documents and publications and are not the main focus of this paper. However, they will be reviewed and discussed as follows. Several important principles of medical ethics will be of particular relevance in considering this issue. Physicians have an obligation to be beneficent to their patients and to consider what is in the patient's best interest. According to the first paragraph of the CMA Code of Ethics (2004), "Consider first the well-being of the patient". Traditionally, physicians have also respected the principle of altruism, whereby they set aside concern for their own health and well-being in order to serve their patients. While this has often manifested itself primarily as long hours away from home and family, and a benign neglect of personal health issues, at times more drastic sacrifices have been required. During previous pandemics, many physicians have served selflessly in the public interest, often at great risk to their own well-being. The principle of justice requires physicians to consider what is owed to whom and why, including what resources are needed, and how these resources would best be employed during a pandemic. These resources might include physician services but could also include access to vaccines and medications, as well as access to equipment such as ventilators or to a bed in the intensive care unit. According to paragraph 43 of the CMA Code of Ethics, physicians have an obligation to "Recognize the responsibility of physicians to promote equitable access to health care resources". In addition, physicians can reasonably be expected to participate in the process of planning for a pandemic or other medical disaster. According to paragraph 42 of the CMA Code of Ethics, physicians should "Recognize the profession's responsibility to society in matters relating to public health, health education, environmental protection, legislation affecting the health and well-being of the community and the need for testimony at judicial proceedings". This responsibility could reasonably be seen to apply both to individual physicians as well as the various bodies and organizations that represent them. Physicians also have an ethical obligation to recognize their limitations and the extent of the services they are able to provide. During a pandemic, physicians may be asked to assume roles or responsibilities with which they are not comfortable, nor prepared. Paragraph 15 of the CMA Code of Ethics reminds physicians to "Recognize your limitations and, when indicated, recommend or seek additional opinions or services". However, physicians have moral rights as well as obligations. The concept of personal autonomy allows physicians some discretion in determining where, how and when they will practice medicine. They also have an obligation to safeguard their own health. As stated in paragraph 10 of the CMA Code of Ethics, physicians should "Promote and maintain your own health and well-being". The SARS epidemic has served to reopen the ethical debate. Health care practitioners have been forced to reconsider their obligations during a pandemic, including whether they must provide care to all those in need regardless of the level of personal risk. As well, they have been re-examining the obligation of governments and others to provide reciprocal services to physicians, and the relationship between these obligations. B. Reciprocal obligations towards physicians While there has been much debate historically (and especially more recently) about the ethical obligations of physicians towards their patients and society in general, the consideration of reciprocal obligations towards physicians is a relatively recent phenomenon. During the SARS epidemic, a large number of Canadian physicians unselfishly volunteered to assist their colleagues in trying to bring the epidemic under control. They did so, in many cases, in spite of significant personal risk, and with very little information about the nature of the illness, particularly early in the course of the outbreak. Retrospective analysis has cast significant doubt and concern on the amount of support and assistance provided to physicians during the crisis. Communication and infrastructure support was poor at best. Equipment was often lacking and not always up to standard when it was available. Psychological support and counselling was not readily available at the point of care, nor was financial compensation for those who missed work due to illness or quarantine. Although the Ontario government did provide retrospective compensation for many physicians whose practices were affected by the outbreak, the issue was addressed late, and not at all in some cases. It is clear that Canadian physicians have learned greatly from this experience. The likelihood of individuals again volunteering "blindly" has been reduced to the point where it may never happen again. There are expectations that certain conditions and obligations will be met in order to optimize patient care and outcomes and to protect health care workers and their families. Because physicians and other health care providers will be expected to put themselves directly in harm's way, and to bear a disproportionate burden of the personal hardships associated with a pandemic, the argument has been made that society has a reciprocal obligation to support and compensate these individuals. According to the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics report We stand on guard for thee, "(The substantive value of) reciprocity requires that society support those who face a disproportionate burden in protecting the public good, and take steps to minimize burdens as much as possible. Measures to protect the public good are likely to impose a disproportionate burden on health care workers, patients and their families." Therefore, in order to provide adequate care for patients, the reciprocal obligation to physicians requires providing some or all of the following: Prior to a pandemic - Physicians and the organizations that represent them should be more involved in planning and decision making at the local, national and international levels. In turn, physicians and the organizations that represent them have an obligation to participate as well. - Physicians should be made aware of a clear plan for resource utilization, including: - how physicians will be relieved of duties after a certain time; - clearly defined roles and expectations, especially for those practicing outside of their area of expertise; - vaccination/treatment plans - will physicians (and their families) have preferential access based on the need to keep caregivers healthy and on the job; - triage plans, including how the triage model might be altered and plans to inform the public of such. - Physicians should have access to the best equipment needed and should be able to undergo extra training in its use if required. - Politicians and leaders should provide reassurances that satisfy physicians that they will not be "conscripted" by legislation. During a pandemic - Physicians should have access to up-to-date, real time information. - Physicians should be kept informed about developments in Canada and globally. - Communication channels should be opened with other countries (e.g. Canada should participate in WHO initiatives to identify the threats before they arrive on our doorstep). - Resources should be provided for backup and relief of physicians and health care workers. - Arrangements should be made for timely provision of necessary equipment in an ongoing fashion. - Physicians should be compensated for lost clinical earnings and to cover expenses such as lost wages, lost group earnings, overhead, medical care, medications, rehabilitative therapy and other relevant expenses in case of quarantine, clinic cancellations or illness (recognizing that determining exactly when or where an infection was acquired may be difficult). - Families should receive financial compensation in the case of a physician family member who dies as a result of providing care during a pandemic. - In the event that physicians may be called upon in a pandemic to practice outside of their area of expertise or outside their jurisdiction, they should to contact their professional liability protection provider for information on their eligibility for protection in these circumstances. - Interprovincial or national licensing programs should be developed to provide physicians with back-up and relief and ensure experts can move from place to place in a timely fashion without undue burden. - Psychological and emotional counselling and support should be provided in a timely fashion for physicians, their staff and family members. - Accommodation (i.e. a place to stay) should be provided for physicians who have to travel to another locale to provide care; or who don't want to go home and put their family at risk, when this is applicable, i.e. the epidemiology of the infectious disease causing the pandemic indicates substantially greater risk of acquiring infection in the health care setting than in the community. - Billing and compensation arrangements should ensure physicians are properly compensated for the services they are providing, including those who may not have an active billing number in the province where the services are being provided. After a pandemic - Physicians should receive assistance in restarting their practice (replacing staff, restocking overhead, communicating with patients, and any other costs related to restarting the practice). - Physicians should receive ongoing psychological support and counselling as required. C. How are physician obligations and reciprocal obligations related? Beyond a simple statement of the various obligations, it is clear that there must be some link between these different obligations. This is particularly important since there is now some time to plan for the next pandemic and to ensure that reciprocal obligations can be met prior to its onset. Physicians have always provided care in emergency situations without questioning what they are owed. According to paragraph 18 of the CMA Code of Ethics, physicians should "Provide whatever appropriate assistance you can to any person with an urgent need for medical care". However, in situations where obligations can be anticipated and met in advance, it is reasonable to expect that they will be addressed. Whereas a physician who encounters an emergency situation at the site of a car crash will act without concern for personal gain or motivation, a physician caring for the same patient in an emergency department will rightly expect the availability of proper equipment and personnel. In order to ensure proper patient care and physician safety, and to ensure physicians are able to meet their professional obligations and standards, the reciprocal obligations outlined above should be addressed by the appropriate body or organization. Conclusion If patient and physician well-being is not optimized by clarifying the obligations of physicians and society prior to the next pandemic, in spite of available time and resources necessary to do so, there are many who would call into question the ethical duty of physicians to provide care. However, the CMA believes that, in the very best and most honourable traditions of the medical profession, its members will provide care and compassion to those in need. We call on governments and society to assist us in optimizing this care for all Canadians.
Documents
Less detail

Wait Time Alliance's benchmarks for psychiatric care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11687
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC08-14
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments, within their areas of jurisdiction, to adopt the Wait Time Alliance's benchmarks for psychiatric care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC08-14
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments, within their areas of jurisdiction, to adopt the Wait Time Alliance's benchmarks for psychiatric care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments, within their areas of jurisdiction, to adopt the Wait Time Alliance's benchmarks for psychiatric care.
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Health Canada's new radon exposure guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11689
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-84
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to ensure that private residences and public and commercial buildings in Canada are appropriately tested to meet Health Canada's new radon exposure guidelines.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC08-84
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to ensure that private residences and public and commercial buildings in Canada are appropriately tested to meet Health Canada's new radon exposure guidelines.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to ensure that private residences and public and commercial buildings in Canada are appropriately tested to meet Health Canada's new radon exposure guidelines.
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Canadian citizens completing medical training outside of Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11690
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC08-96
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy to facilitate the entry of Canadian citizens completing medical training outside of Canada into Canadian postgraduate training programs so long as this does not compromise the ability of graduates of Canadian medical schools to continue to obtain priority access to guaranteed residency training positions.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC08-96
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy to facilitate the entry of Canadian citizens completing medical training outside of Canada into Canadian postgraduate training programs so long as this does not compromise the ability of graduates of Canadian medical schools to continue to obtain priority access to guaranteed residency training positions.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy to facilitate the entry of Canadian citizens completing medical training outside of Canada into Canadian postgraduate training programs so long as this does not compromise the ability of graduates of Canadian medical schools to continue to obtain priority access to guaranteed residency training positions.
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CanMEDs manager role and competencies

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11691
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC08-104
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on undergraduate medical education and postgraduate training programs at Canada's faculties of medicine to develop an integrated approach to teaching the principles of the CanMEDs manager role and competencies to all medical students and resident trainees.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2008-08-20
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC08-104
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on undergraduate medical education and postgraduate training programs at Canada's faculties of medicine to develop an integrated approach to teaching the principles of the CanMEDs manager role and competencies to all medical students and resident trainees.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on undergraduate medical education and postgraduate training programs at Canada's faculties of medicine to develop an integrated approach to teaching the principles of the CanMEDs manager role and competencies to all medical students and resident trainees.
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