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CMA Letter to the Legislative Committee on Bill C-30: Clean Air Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8714
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-02-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-02-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to participate in the review of the Clean Air Act, Bill C- 30. The CMA, first founded in 1867, currently represents more than 64,000 physicians across the country. Our mission includes advocating for the highest standard of health and health care for all Canadians and we are committed to activities that will result in healthy public policy. The Environment: A Key Determinant of Health The physical environment is a key determinant of a population's health and the medical profession is concerned about environmental conditions that contribute to declining health in individuals and the population as a whole. Physicians have been part of an early warning system of scientists and other health professionals calling attention to the effects on human health of poor air quality because we see the impact in our practice and in our communities. There is strong evidence that air pollution is the most harmful environmental problem in Canada in terms of human health effects. We know from the smog health studies undertaken by the Ontario Medical Association (OMA), Health Canada and others, about the public health crisis created by polluted air in many parts of Canada. And it is a crisis. A study by the federal government estimated that 5,900 premature deaths occur annually in eight large Canadian cities. This is a conservative estimate as the study focused on the short-term impact of smog pollutants using time-series studies. This study was never extrapolated to the whole Canadian population, but we know that only approximately one third of the Canadian population, mainly residents of large, urban areas, were included in the analysis.1 The OMA Illness Costs of Air Pollution study estimated that there were 5,800 premature deaths due to air pollution in Ontario alone in 2005, and examined both short-term and long-term health impacts. The OMA projected that the annual figure will grow to 10,000 premature deaths by 2026 unless effective steps are taken to reduce smog.2 In addition to premature deaths, the OMA estimated that there were 16,000 hospital admissions and 60,000 emergency room visits in Ontario in 2005 because of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses associated with air pollution exposure. During that same year, the OMA also estimated that there were 29 million minor illness days, defined as days where individuals either suffered from asthma symptoms or had to restrict their activities. Most of the people affected by these so-called minor illness days are children. In British Columbia, the Provincial Officer for Health published a conservative estimate in 2004 that air pollution in B.C. is causing between 140 and 400 premature deaths, 700 to 2,100 hospital stays, and between 900 and 2,750 emergency room visits each year.3 The direct and indirect costs of air pollution on the health of Canadians are estimated to be in the billions of dollars. According to the Ontario Medical Association, in 2005, air pollution costs in Ontario were estimated at: - $374 million in lost productivity and work time; - $507 million in direct health care costs; - $537 million in pain and suffering due to non-fatal illness; and - $6.4 billion in loss due to premature death.4 In Canada the environment is currently considered to be the most important issue facing society. In a recent poll by the Strategic Counsel for the Globe & Mail/CTV5 a majority of respondents ranked the impact of toxic chemicals, air and water pollution and global warming as life threatening. The environment, while a major concern today for the general public, has been of concern to physicians for some time. CMA, Health and the Environment In 1991 the CMA, released a policy paper Health, the Environment and Sustainable Development6 that clearly linked health and the environment. Building on the 1987 Brundtland Report (World Commission on Environment and Development, Our Common Future) that tied sustainable development to the environment and the economy, the CMA inserted health into this pair of interactions and stated that "continued environmental degradation will increase hazard to human health." The paper concluded with a number of recommendations for governments, the health sector, and physicians in support of environmentally sustainable development. The CMA has continued to give attention to environmental issues urging the government, prior to Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, to commit to choosing a climate change strategy that satisfies Canada's international commitments while maximizing the clean air co-benefits and smog-reduction potential of any greenhouse gas reduction initiatives. In 2002, the CMA also recommended that the federal Environment and Health Ministers commit their departments to improved health-based reporting by regularly updating the health effects information for pollutants of concern. Clean Air Act: A Physicians Perspective Doctors understand the concept that success from an intervention can be nuanced. In the case of disease, physicians know and accept that there are benefits of treatment even if a patient cannot be cured. Sometimes we just reduce their symptoms, or slow their rate of decline. But when treating the natural environment, so critical to human health, we suggest that you cannot accept a palliative solution. We must aim for cure. We must commit to measures of success in terms of real improvement in health. It is through this lens that the CMA urges that you view the Clean Air Act to ensure that it is health-relevant. The CMA would like to commend this government for acknowledging the impact of the physical environment on human health and we are encouraged that the Act recognizes the intimate connection between greenhouse gas reductions and improved air quality. Air pollution does not respect provincial borders therefore it is very important to establish national objectives and Canada wide standards that are strong and consistent across the country. To be health relevant national air quality objectives must result in air quality improvements. To this end, regardless of whether they are called objectives or standards, national air quality targets must protect the health of all Canadians and must be binding. Voluntary air quality guidelines guarantee no health benefit. The federal government must ensure that there is a regulatory framework in place to ensure that the standards are mandatory across the country. The annual reporting to Parliament on the attainment of the national air quality objectives and the effectiveness of measures to attain the objectives, as outlined in the Act, is very important. Transparency in reporting is essential to the integrity of any program, but is integral to the determination of health benefit. The International Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment report released on February 2, 2007, concluded that global warming is unequivocal and that human activity is the main driver, asserting with near certainty - more than 90 percent confidence - that carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping greenhouse gases from human activities have been the main causes of warming since 1950. Its Third Assessment report: Climate Change 2001: Working Group II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability noted that global climate change will have a wide range of impacts on human health. "Overall, negative health impacts are expected to outweigh positive health impacts. Some health impacts would result from changes in the frequencies and intensities of extremes of heat and cold and of floods and droughts. Other health impacts would result from the impacts of climate change on ecological and social systems and would include changes in infectious disease occurrence, local food production and nutritional adequacy, and concentrations of local air pollutants and aeroallergens, as well as various health consequences of population displacement and economic disruption."7 Given the indisputable impact of greenhouse gas increases on climate change and its connection to human health, it is critical to ensure that Canada is moving quickly to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Clean Air Act and the subsequent notice of intent sets out short, medium and long term targets and timelines for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. The target setting approach proposed in the Act, based on emission intensity in the short and medium term is not health relevant. To be health relevant, targets should be presented in the context of overall emissions, i.e., emissions reductions minus emissions increases. An emission reduction from a particular source is only health-relevant if we can guarantee that there is not a corresponding emissions increase at another source nearby, because it is the absolute exposure that an individual experiences that affects the risk of an adverse health effect. Just as slowing the progression of a disease can never be considered a cure, attempting only to limit the growth of those emissions cannot result in true success by any measure. It is not until 2050 that the government has committed to achieving an absolute reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of between 45 - 65% of 2003 levels. Based on the emission intensity targets in the Clean Air Act, emissions and air pollution levels will, in fact, continue to rise as will the health consequences. In order to protect the health of Canadians the government needs to set policies, with targets and timelines that maximize absolute reductions in greenhouse gases, which are consistent with the scale and urgency of the challenge. To ensure that prescribed policies result in the intended environment and health outcomes, short and medium-term targets for absolute emission reductions would benchmark progress and allow for mid-course corrections, if they were needed. With respect to indoor air quality, physicians have long been proponents of initiatives to reduce exposure to contaminants such as second-hand tobacco smoke. The CMA is concerned about the impact on human health of exposure to high levels of radon and the associated increased risk of lung cancer. The intention to develop measures to address indoor air quality through a national radon strategy is a positive step. It is important that our patients are made aware of such threats in their homes, and also that they are presented with a way to reduce their exposure. Environmentally related illness is essentially the combined result of exposure and vulnerability. We are vulnerable because we are human beings; each human being has different physical strengths and weaknesses. Some vulnerabilities to environmental influences are genetic, and some the results of pre-existing disease. There is not much that government can do about this part of the equation. Our exposure, on the other hand is related to the air we breathe, water we drink and food we eat. This is where the federal government is critical, and where the measures of success will be the most important. Proxy measures for the health outcomes that matter must be relevant from a health perspective. Health-based success can only be measured by quantifiable reductions in the exposure levels of contaminants in our air as well as in our water and soil. Clean air is absolutely fundamental to a healthy population - without it all else is irrelevant. Actions to curb air pollution must be taken in all sectors and levels of society in a concerted, non-partisan effort with the health of the population and the planet as our yardstick of success. Thank you for the opportunity to provide our comments on Bill C-30, the Clean Air Act. We look forward to working with you to improve the Clean Air Act and ensure that the measure of its success will benefit the health of Canadians. Sincerely Colin J. McMillan, MD, CM, FRCPC, FACP President 1 S. Judek, B. Jessiman, D. Stieb, and R. Vet. 2005. Estimated Number of Excess Deaths in Canada Due to Air Pollution". Health Canada and Environment Canada. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/media/ nr-cp/2005/2005_32bk2_e.html#top 2 Ontario Medical Association. 2005. The Illness Costs of Air Pollution: 2005-2026 Health and Economic Damage Estimates. Toronto: OMA. 3 B.C. Provincial Health Officer. 2004. Every Breath You Take: Air Quality in British Columbia, A Public Health Perspective. 2003 Annual Report. Victoria: Ministry of Health Services. 4 Ontario Medical Association , 2005 5 GLOBE/CTV POLL Climate concerns now top security and health One in four label environmental issues as most important, The Globe and Mail, Fri 26 Jan 2007, Page: A1, Section: National News , Byline: Brian Laghi 6 Health, the Environment and Sustainable Development, Canadian Medical Association , 1991 7 WMO Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2001, IPPC Third Assessment Report: Working Group II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, accessed Feb 7, 2007 http://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg2/348.htm
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Guidelines for Physicians in Interactions with Industry

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9041
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-12-01
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-12-01
Replaces
Physicians and the pharmaceutical industry (Update 2001)
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
GUIDELINES FOR PHYSICIANS IN INTERACTIONS WITH INDUSTRY The history of health care delivery in Canada has included interaction between physicians and the pharmaceutical and health supply industries; this interaction has extended to research as well as to education. Physicians understand that they have a responsibility to ensure that their participation in such collaborative efforts is in keeping with their primary obligation to their patients and duties to society, and to avoid situations of conflict of interest where possible and appropriately manage these situations when necessary. They understand as well the need for the profession to lead by example by promoting physician-developed guidelines. The following guidelines have been developed by the CMA to serve as a resource tool for physicians in helping them to determine what type of relationship with industry is appropriate. They are not intended to prohibit or dissuade appropriate interactions of this type, which have the potential to benefit both patients and physicians. Although directed primarily to individual physicians, including residents, and medical students, the guidelines also apply to relationships between industry and medical organizations. General Principles 1. The primary objective of professional interactions between physicians and industry should be the advancement of the health of Canadians. 2. Relationships between physicians and industry are guided by the CMA's Code of Ethics and by this document. 3. The practising physician's primary obligation is to the patient. Relationships with industry are inappropriate if they negatively affect the fiduciary nature of the patient-physician relationship. 4. Physicians should resolve any conflict of interest between themselves and their patients resulting from interactions with industry in favour of their patients. In particular, they must avoid any self-interest in their prescribing and referral practices. 5. Except for physicians who are employees of industry, in relations with industry the physician should always maintain professional autonomy and independence. All physicians should remain committed to scientific methodology. 6. Those physicians with ties to industry have an obligation to disclose those ties in any situation where they could reasonably be perceived as having the potential to influence their judgment. Industry-Sponsored Research 7. A prerequisite for physician participation in all research activities is that these activities are ethically defensible, socially responsible and scientifically valid. The physician's primary responsibility is the well-being of the patient. 8. The participation of physicians in industry sponsored research activities must always be preceded by formal approval of the project by an appropriate ethics review body. Such research must be conducted according to the appropriate current standards and procedures. 9. Patient enrolment and participation in research studies must occur only with the full, informed, competent and voluntary consent of the patient or his or her proxy, unless the research ethics board authorizes an exemption to the requirement for consent. In particular, the enrolling physician must inform the potential research subject, or proxy, about the purpose of the study, its source of funding, the nature and relative probability of harms and benefits, and the nature of the physician's participation and must advise prospective subjects that they have the right to decline to participate or to withdraw from the study at any time, without prejudice to their ongoing care. 10. The physician who enrolls a patient in a research study has an obligation to ensure the protection of the patient's privacy, in accordance with the provisions of applicable national or provincial legislation and CMA's Health Information Privacy Code. If this protection cannot be guaranteed, the physician must disclose this as part of the informed consent process. 11. Practising physicians should not participate in clinical trials unless the study will be registered prior to its commencement in a publicly accessible research registry. 12. Because of the potential to influence judgment, remuneration to physicians for participating in research studies should not constitute enticement. It may cover reasonable time and expenses and should be approved by the relevant research ethics board. Research subjects must be informed if their physician will receive a fee for their participation and by whom the fee will be paid. 13. Finder's fees, whereby the sole activity performed by the physician is to submit the names of potential research subjects, should not be paid. Submission of patient information without their consent would be a breach of confidentiality. Physicians who meet with patients, discuss the study and obtain informed consent for submission of patient information may be remunerated for this activity. 14. Incremental costs (additional costs that are directly related to the research study) must not be paid by health care institutions or provincial or other insurance agencies regardless of whether these costs involve diagnostic procedures or patient services. Instead, they must be assumed by the industry sponsor or its agent. 15. When submitting articles to medical journals, physicians must state any relationship they have to companies providing funding for the studies or that make the products that are the subject of the study whether or not the journals require such disclosure. Funding sources for the study should also be disclosed. 16. Physicians should only be included as an author of a published article reporting the results of an industry sponsored trial if they have contributed substantively to the study or the composition of the article. 17. Physicians should not enter into agreements that limit their right to publish or disclose results of the study or report adverse events which occur during the course of the study. Reasonable limitations which do not endanger patient health or safety may be permissible. Industry-Sponsored Surveillance Studies 18. Physicians should participate only in post-marketing surveillance studies that are scientifically appropriate for drugs or devices relevant to their area of practice and where the study may contribute substantially to knowledge about the drug or device. Studies that are clearly intended for marketing or other purposes should be avoided. 19. Such studies must be reviewed and approved by an appropriate research ethics board. The National Council on Ethics in Human Research is an additional source of advice. 20. The physician still has an obligation to report adverse events to the appropriate body or authority while participating in such a study. Continuing Medical Education / Continuing Professional Development (CME/CPD) 21. This section of the Guidelines is understood to address primarily medical education initiatives designed for practicing physicians. However, the same principles will also apply for educational events (such as noon-hour rounds and journal clubs) which are held as part of medical or residency training. 22. The primary purpose of CME/CPD activities is to address the educational needs of physicians and other health care providers in order to improve the health care of patients. Activities that are primarily promotional in nature, such as satellite symposia, should be identified as such to faculty and attendees and should not be considered as CME/CPD. 23. The ultimate decision on the organization, content and choice of CME/CPD activities for physicians shall be made by the physician-organizers. 24. CME/CPD organizers and individual physician presenters are responsible for ensuring the scientific validity, objectivity and completeness of CME/CPD activities. Organizers and individual presenters must disclose to the participants at their CME/CPD events any financial affiliations with manufacturers of products mentioned at the event or with manufacturers of competing products. There should be a procedure available to manage conflicts once they are disclosed. 25. The ultimate decision on funding arrangements for CME/CPD activities is the responsibility of the physician-organizers. Although the CME/CPD publicity and written materials may acknowledge the financial or other aid received, they must not identify the products of the company(ies) that fund the activities. 26. All funds from a commercial source should be in the form of an unrestricted educational grant payable to the institution or organization sponsoring the CME/CPD activity. 27. Industry representatives should not be members of CME content planning committees. They may be involved in providing logistical support. 28. Generic names should be used in addition to trade names in the course of CME/CPD activities. 29. Physicians should not engage in peer selling. Peer selling occurs when a pharmaceutical or medical device manufacturer or service provider engages a physician to conduct a seminar or similar event that focuses on its own products and is designed to enhance the sale of those products. This also applies to third party contracting on behalf of industry. This form of participation would reasonably be seen as being in contravention of the CMA's Code of Ethics, which prohibits endorsement of a specific product. 30. If specific products or services are mentioned, there should be a balanced presentation of the prevailing body of scientific information on the product or service and of reasonable, alternative treatment options. If unapproved uses of a product or service are discussed, presenters must inform the audience of this fact. 31. Negotiations for promotional displays at CME/CPD functions should not be influenced by industry sponsorship of the activity. Promotional displays should not be in the same room as the educational activity. 32. Travel and accommodation arrangements, social events and venues for industry sponsored CME/CPD activities should be in keeping with the arrangements that would normally be made without industry sponsorship. For example, the industry sponsor should not pay for travel or lodging costs or for other personal expenses of physicians attending a CME/CPD event. Subsidies for hospitality should not be accepted outside of modest meals or social events that are held as part of a conference or meeting. Hospitality and other arrangements should not be subsidized by sponsors for personal guests of attendees or faculty, including spouses or family members. 33. Faculty at CME/CPD events may accept reasonable honoraria and reimbursement for travel, lodging and meal expenses. All attendees at an event cannot be designated faculty. Faculty indicates a presenter who prepares and presents a substantive educational session in an area where they are a recognized expert or authority. Electronic Continuing Professional Development (eCPD) 34. The same general principles which apply to "live, in person" CPD events, as outlined above, also apply to eCPD (or any other written curriculum-based CPD) modules. The term "eCPD" generally refers to accredited on-line or internet-based CPD content or modules. However, the following principles can also apply to any type of written curriculum based CPD. 35. Authors of eCPD modules are ultimately responsible for ensuring the content and validity of these modules and should ensure that they are both designed and delivered at arms'-length of any industry sponsors. 36. Authors of eCPD modules should be physicians with a special expertise in the relevant clinical area and must declare any relationships with the sponsors of the module or any competing companies. 37. There should be no direct links to an industry or product website on any web page which contains eCPD material. 38. Information related to any activity carried out by the eCPD participant should only be collected, used, displayed or disseminated with the express informed consent of that participant. 39. The methodologies of studies cited in the eCPD module should be available to participants to allow them to evaluate the quality of the evidence discussed. Simply presenting abstracts that preclude the participant from evaluating the quality of evidence should be avoided. When the methods of cited studies are not available in the abstracts, they should be described in the body of the eCPD module. 40. If the content of eCPD modules is changed, re-accreditation is required. Advisory/Consultation Boards 41. Physicians may be approached by industry representatives and asked to become members of advisory or consultation boards, or to serve as individual advisors or consultants. Physicians should be mindful of the potential for this relationship to influence their clinical decision making. While there is a legitimate role for physicians to play in these capacities, the following principles should be observed: A. The exact deliverables of the arrangement should be clearly set out and put in writing in the form of a contractual agreement. The purpose of the arrangement should be exclusively for the physician to impart specialized medical knowledge that could not otherwise be acquired by the hiring company, and should not include any promotional or educational activities on the part of the company itself. B. Remuneration of the physician should be reasonable and take into account the extent and complexity of the physician's involvement. C. Whenever possible, meetings should be held in the geographic locale of the physician or as part of a meeting which he/she would normally attend. When these arrangements are not feasible, basic travel and accommodation expenses may be reimbursed to the physician advisor or consultant. Meetings should not be held outside of Canada, with the exception of international boards. Clinical Evaluation Packages (Samples) 42. The distribution of samples should not involve any form of material gain for the physician or for the practice with which he or she is associated. 43. Physicians who accept samples or other health care products are responsible for recording the type and amount of medication or product dispensed. They are also responsible for ensuring their age-related quality and security and their proper disposal. Gifts 44. Practising physicians should not accept personal gifts of any significant monetary or other value from industry. Physicians should be aware that acceptance of gifts of any value has been shown to have the potential to influence clinical decision making. Other Considerations 45. These guidelines apply to relationships between physicians and all commercial organizations, including but not limited to manufacturers of medical devices, nutritional products and health care products as well as service suppliers. 46. Physicians should not dispense pharmaceuticals or other products unless they can demonstrate that these cannot be provided by an appropriate other party, and then only on a cost-recovery basis. 47. Physicians should not invest in industries or related undertakings if this might inappropriately affect the manner of their practice or their prescribing behaviour. 48. Practising physicians affiliated with pharmaceutical companies should not allow their affiliation to influence their medical practice inappropriately. 49. Practising physicians should not accept a fee or equivalent consideration from pharmaceutical manufacturers or distributors in exchange for seeing them in a promotional or similar capacity. 50. Practising physicians may accept patient teaching aids appropriate to their area of practice provided these aids carry at most the logo of the donor company and do not refer to specific therapeutic agents, services or other products. Medical Students and Residents 51. The principles in these guidelines apply to physicians-in training as well as to practising physicians. 52. Medical curricula should deal explicitly with the guidelines by including educational sessions on conflict of interest and physician-industry interactions.
Documents
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Canada’s child and youth health charter

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10327
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
CHILD AND YOUTH HEALTH IN CANADA THEIR CHARTER — OUR CHALLENGE “There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way it treats its children.” Nelson Mandela “One generation plants the trees; another gets the shade.” Chinese Proverb Children and youth have always been a priority for the doctors of Canada — the Child and Youth Health Initiative of the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Paediatric Society and the College of Family Physicians of Canada is evidence of that. We three organizations joined together in November 2006 to launch the Child and Youth Health Initiative. In September 2004, Canada’s first ministers committed to “improving the health status of Canadians through a collaborative process.” This led to an agreement on health goals for Canada. The first of them is “Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” At the international level, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child sets out the wider rights of all children and young people, including the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. We now owe it to our children and youth to develop tangible health goals and targets. From the outset of the partnership, we were acutely aware that only a broad societal coalition could achieve the overarching goal of excellence in child and youth health in Canada. Making the health of children and youth a national priority requires a coalition of child and youth health champions, including governments, parents, health providers, businesses, schools, teachers and communities. To start that process, we created Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter. An action framework was then developed called Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge because a charter alone will not deliver on the vision of the children and youth of Canada being among the healthiest in the world. Together, we believe they will help to build a coalition of child and youth health champions because they give the people who can make a difference in children and youth health a rallying point. The credibility and success of the Charter and the Challenge require broad, inclusive consultation and a commitment to child and youth health from society at large. The Child and Youth Health Summit, held April 25-26, 2007, was about consultation and commitment to making a difference to the health and well-being of children and youth. This document contains Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter, which was one of the focuses of the summit. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge and Canada’s Child and Youth Health Declaration, are the other components of our commitment and promise to take action for the children of Canada. These documents can be found at www.ourchildren.ca. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter In 2005, Canada’s federal, provincial and territorial governments created pan-Canadian health goals. The first of them is “Canada is a country where: Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” To reach their potential, children and youth need to grow up in a place where they can thrive — spiritually, emotionally, mentally, physically and intellectually — and get high-quality health care when they need it. That place must have three fundamental elements: a safe and secure environment; good health and development; and a full range of health resources available to all. Children and youth of distinct populations in Canada, including First Nations, Inuit and Métis, must be offered equal opportunities as other Canadian children and youth through culturally relevant resources. Canada must become: 1. A place with a safe and secure environment: a) Clean water, air and soil; b) Protection from injury, exploitation and discrimination; and c) Healthy family, homes and communities. 2. A place where children and youth can have good health and development: a) Prenatal and maternal care for the best possible health at birth; b) Nutrition for proper growth, development and long-term health; c) Early learning opportunities and high-quality care, at home and in the community; d) Opportunities and encouragement for physical activity; e) High-quality primary and secondary education; f) Affordable and available post-secondary education; and g) A commitment to social well-being and mental health. 3. A place where a full range of health resources is available: a) Basic health care including immunization, drugs and dental health; b) Mental health care and early help programs for children and youth; c) Timely access to specialty diagnostic and health services; d) Measurement and tracking the health of children and youth; e) Research that focuses on the needs of children and youth; and f) Uninterrupted care as youth move to adult health services and between acute, chronic and community care, as well as between jurisdictions. NOTES 1. The principles of this charter apply to all children and youth in Canada regardless of race, ethnicity, creed, language, gender, physical ability, mental ability, cultural history, or life experience. 2. Principles enshrined in all the goal statements include: a. Universality: The charter applies equally to all children and youth residing in Canada and covers all children and youth from 0-18 years of age. b. Without financial burden: All children and youth in Canada should have access to required health care, health services and drugs regardless of ability to pay. c. Barrier-free access: All children and youth, regardless of ability or circumstance should have appropriate access to optimal health care and health services. d. Measurement and monitoring: Appropriate resources will be available for adequate ongoing collection of data on issues that affect child and youth health and development. e. Safe and secure communities: Communities in Canada must create an environment for children and youth to grow that is safe and secure. 3. The purpose of this charter is to facilitate development of specific goals, objectives, actions and advocacy that will measurably improve child and youth health throughout Canada. 4. Success will be identified as simple, measurable, achievable, and timely goals and objectives for each of the 16 statements in this charter. 5. The initial draft of this charter has been developed by Canada’s physicians focusing on what they can best do to improve child and youth health; however, the support and participation of all individuals and groups interested in child and youth health is encouraged and desired. 6. The primary audience for actions and advocacy arising from this charter will be governments, agencies or individuals who, by virtue of legislation, regulation or policy have the ability to effect change for children and youth. 7. This charter is not a legal document; it represents a commitment by champions of child and youth health in Canada to the health and well-being of all children and youth in Canada. Charter Endorsers The following organizations have endorsed the Child and Youth Health Charter, as of October 9, 2007. Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada Breakfast for Learning Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres Canadian Child and Youth Health Coalition Canadian Healthcare Association Canadian Institute of Child Health Canadian Medical Association Canadian Paediatric Society Canadian Pharmacists Association Canadian Psychological Association Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development Centre for Science in the Public Interest College of Family Physicians of Canada Landon Pearson Resource Centre for the Study of Childhood and Children's Rights Muttart Foundation National Alliance for Children and Youth National Anti-Poverty Organization Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association Paediatric Chairs of Canada Safe Kids Canada, The National Injury Prevention Program of The Hospital for Sick Children Silken's ActiveKids Movement and Silken and Company Productions The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
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Statement on radiation protection

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy799
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1982-09-21
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC82-34
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the "Statement on Radiation Protection" as its policy on exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Statement on Radiation Protection The Canadian Medical Association is aware of the potential health hazards associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and has examined the possibility that detrimental effects might result from the long term exposure of the general population to low-level radiation as a result of nuclear energy production. The Association is satisfied that, where internationally recommended criteria for radiological protection have been adopted and effectively implemented, there is at present no conclusive evidence of a measurable increase, in the long or short term, of adverse effects due specifically to radiation in populations thus exposed. The Association recognizes the need for ongoing support of research related to the health aspects of nuclear power generation, and to the management of radioactive wastes in general, the management of wastes from uranium mines in particular; and the need for the epidemiological surveillance of exposed populations. The Association also recognizes the need to develop and enforce appropriate standards and regulations where indicated.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1982-09-21
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC82-34
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the "Statement on Radiation Protection" as its policy on exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Statement on Radiation Protection The Canadian Medical Association is aware of the potential health hazards associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and has examined the possibility that detrimental effects might result from the long term exposure of the general population to low-level radiation as a result of nuclear energy production. The Association is satisfied that, where internationally recommended criteria for radiological protection have been adopted and effectively implemented, there is at present no conclusive evidence of a measurable increase, in the long or short term, of adverse effects due specifically to radiation in populations thus exposed. The Association recognizes the need for ongoing support of research related to the health aspects of nuclear power generation, and to the management of radioactive wastes in general, the management of wastes from uranium mines in particular; and the need for the epidemiological surveillance of exposed populations. The Association also recognizes the need to develop and enforce appropriate standards and regulations where indicated.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the "Statement on Radiation Protection" as its policy on exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Statement on Radiation Protection The Canadian Medical Association is aware of the potential health hazards associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and has examined the possibility that detrimental effects might result from the long term exposure of the general population to low-level radiation as a result of nuclear energy production. The Association is satisfied that, where internationally recommended criteria for radiological protection have been adopted and effectively implemented, there is at present no conclusive evidence of a measurable increase, in the long or short term, of adverse effects due specifically to radiation in populations thus exposed. The Association recognizes the need for ongoing support of research related to the health aspects of nuclear power generation, and to the management of radioactive wastes in general, the management of wastes from uranium mines in particular; and the need for the epidemiological surveillance of exposed populations. The Association also recognizes the need to develop and enforce appropriate standards and regulations where indicated.
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Patient-focused Funding

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8729
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-02-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-04-143
The Canadian Medical Association will study the implications and potential for the introduction of “Patient-focused Funding” on a priority basis.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-02-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-04-143
The Canadian Medical Association will study the implications and potential for the introduction of “Patient-focused Funding” on a priority basis.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will study the implications and potential for the introduction of “Patient-focused Funding” on a priority basis.
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Canada Extended Health Services Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8840
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-10
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-10
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
Less detail

Continuum of care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8844
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-14
The Canadian Medical Association believes that the issue of the continuum of care must go beyond the question of financing and tackle questions related to the organisation of medicine and to the shared and joint responsibilities of individuals, communities and governments in matters of health care and promotion, prevention and rehabilitation.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-14
The Canadian Medical Association believes that the issue of the continuum of care must go beyond the question of financing and tackle questions related to the organisation of medicine and to the shared and joint responsibilities of individuals, communities and governments in matters of health care and promotion, prevention and rehabilitation.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association believes that the issue of the continuum of care must go beyond the question of financing and tackle questions related to the organisation of medicine and to the shared and joint responsibilities of individuals, communities and governments in matters of health care and promotion, prevention and rehabilitation.
Less detail

Informal caregivers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8846
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-16
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that governments undertake pilot studies to support informal caregivers and long-term care patients, including those that: a. explore tax credits and/or direct compensation to compensate informal caregivers for their work; b. expand relief programs for informal caregivers that provide guaranteed access to respite services in emergency situations; c. expand income and asset testing for residents requiring assisted living and long-term care; and d. promote information on advanced directives and representation agreements for patients.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-16
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that governments undertake pilot studies to support informal caregivers and long-term care patients, including those that: a. explore tax credits and/or direct compensation to compensate informal caregivers for their work; b. expand relief programs for informal caregivers that provide guaranteed access to respite services in emergency situations; c. expand income and asset testing for residents requiring assisted living and long-term care; and d. promote information on advanced directives and representation agreements for patients.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that governments undertake pilot studies to support informal caregivers and long-term care patients, including those that: a. explore tax credits and/or direct compensation to compensate informal caregivers for their work; b. expand relief programs for informal caregivers that provide guaranteed access to respite services in emergency situations; c. expand income and asset testing for residents requiring assisted living and long-term care; and d. promote information on advanced directives and representation agreements for patients.
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Mental health resources

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8847
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-17
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates urge governments to ensure adequate mental health resources are available to the military personnel and their families.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-17
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates urge governments to ensure adequate mental health resources are available to the military personnel and their families.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates urge governments to ensure adequate mental health resources are available to the military personnel and their families.
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Long-term health care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8851
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-21
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to study the creation of a compulsory contributions-based social insurance plan to cover long-term health care needs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-21
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to study the creation of a compulsory contributions-based social insurance plan to cover long-term health care needs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges governments to study the creation of a compulsory contributions-based social insurance plan to cover long-term health care needs.
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Canada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8856
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-26
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-26
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
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Putting Patients First: Patient-Centred Collaborative Care - A Discussion Paper

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8863
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-34
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the strategic policy directions outlined in the CMA document Putting Patients First: Patient-Centred Collaborative Care - A Discussion Paper as necessary elements of any collaborative care team.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-34
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the strategic policy directions outlined in the CMA document Putting Patients First: Patient-Centred Collaborative Care - A Discussion Paper as necessary elements of any collaborative care team.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the strategic policy directions outlined in the CMA document Putting Patients First: Patient-Centred Collaborative Care - A Discussion Paper as necessary elements of any collaborative care team.
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Patients with chronic diseases

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8869
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-57
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to implement organizational and financial incentives for better management of patients with chronic diseases.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-57
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to implement organizational and financial incentives for better management of patients with chronic diseases.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to implement organizational and financial incentives for better management of patients with chronic diseases.
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Case-mix groups

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8872
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-60
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canadian Institute for Health Information to develop a state-of-the-art assessment of the development and application of case-mix groups across the provinces and territories.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-60
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canadian Institute for Health Information to develop a state-of-the-art assessment of the development and application of case-mix groups across the provinces and territories.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canadian Institute for Health Information to develop a state-of-the-art assessment of the development and application of case-mix groups across the provinces and territories.
Less detail

Canada's Child Health Initiative

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8874
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-63
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments and other stakeholders work toward the following priorities: - create a children's commissioner and an Office for Children's Health, with a children's health advisor reporting to the Minister of Health - involve children in everything we do - address Aboriginal child health - develop a national child health strategy and national health goals and targets for children - develop an integrated children's health research strategy and an annual report card on children's health.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-63
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments and other stakeholders work toward the following priorities: - create a children's commissioner and an Office for Children's Health, with a children's health advisor reporting to the Minister of Health - involve children in everything we do - address Aboriginal child health - develop a national child health strategy and national health goals and targets for children - develop an integrated children's health research strategy and an annual report card on children's health.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments and other stakeholders work toward the following priorities: - create a children's commissioner and an Office for Children's Health, with a children's health advisor reporting to the Minister of Health - involve children in everything we do - address Aboriginal child health - develop a national child health strategy and national health goals and targets for children - develop an integrated children's health research strategy and an annual report card on children's health.
Less detail

Access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8877
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-66
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-66
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
Less detail

Patient-centred models of collaborative care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8880
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-38
The Canadian Medical Association supports the evolution of patient-centred models of collaborative care in Canada, with the goal of enhancing access to high-quality patient care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-38
The Canadian Medical Association supports the evolution of patient-centred models of collaborative care in Canada, with the goal of enhancing access to high-quality patient care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the evolution of patient-centred models of collaborative care in Canada, with the goal of enhancing access to high-quality patient care.
Less detail

Integrated water stewardship

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8885
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-67
The Canadian Medical Association calls on all levels of government to adopt an integrated water stewardship approach to ensure that all Canadians have access to adequate supplies of clean, safe and reliable drinking water.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-67
The Canadian Medical Association calls on all levels of government to adopt an integrated water stewardship approach to ensure that all Canadians have access to adequate supplies of clean, safe and reliable drinking water.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on all levels of government to adopt an integrated water stewardship approach to ensure that all Canadians have access to adequate supplies of clean, safe and reliable drinking water.
Less detail

Environmental factors and health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8887
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-69
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to fund a national education and prevention campaign to inform Canadians how environmental factors can affect their health.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-69
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to fund a national education and prevention campaign to inform Canadians how environmental factors can affect their health.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to fund a national education and prevention campaign to inform Canadians how environmental factors can affect their health.
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The environment and tax incentives

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8888
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-71
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to provide funding and/or tax incentives to assist the health care sector and health care professionals to adopt more environmentally sensitive practices.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-71
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to provide funding and/or tax incentives to assist the health care sector and health care professionals to adopt more environmentally sensitive practices.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to provide funding and/or tax incentives to assist the health care sector and health care professionals to adopt more environmentally sensitive practices.
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