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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


20 records – page 1 of 1.

Supporting the enactment of Bill C-14, Medical Assistance in Dying

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13693
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2016-05-02
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2016-05-02
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
In this submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, the CMA’s feedback is focused on three of the legislative objectives of Bill C-14, given their relevance to the CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations for a Canadian Approach to Assisted Dying. On behalf of its more than 83,000 members and the Canadian public, the CMA performs a wide variety of functions. Key functions include advocating for health promotion and disease/injury prevention policies and strategies, advocating for access to quality health care, facilitating change within the medical profession, and providing leadership and guidance to physicians to help them influence, manage and adapt to changes in health care delivery. i) Robust Safeguards First, the CMA supports the legislative objective of ensuring a system of robust safeguards to the provision of medical assistance in dying. The safeguards proposed by Bill C-14 include: patient eligibility criteria, process requirements to request medical assistance in dying, as well as monitoring and reporting requirements. The CMA is a voluntary professional organization representing the majority of Canada’s physicians and comprising 12 provincial and territorial divisions and over 60 national medical organizations. ii) Consistent, Pan-Canadian Framework Second, the CMA supports the legislative objective that a consistent framework for medical assistance in dying in Canada is desirable. In addition to robust safeguards, key measures proposed by Bill C-14 support the promulgation of a consistent framework across jurisdictions include legislating definitions for “medical assistance in dying” and “grievous and irremediable condition.” The CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations reflect on the subjective nature of what constitutes “enduring and intolerable suffering” and a “grievous and irremediable condition” as well as the physician’s role in making an eligibility determination. iii) End-of-Life Care Coordination System Thirdly, the CMA supports the objective to develop additional measures to support the provision of a full range of options for end-of-life care and to respect the personal convictions of health care providers. The fulfilment of these commitments with federal non-legislative measures will be integral to supporting the achievement of access to care, respecting the personal convictions of health care providers, and developing a consistent, pan-Canadian framework. The CMA encourages the federal government to rapidly advance its commitment to engage the provinces and territories in developing a pan-Canadian end-of-life care coordinating system. It will be essential for this system to be in place for June 6, 2016. At least one jurisdiction has made a system available to support connecting patients with willing providers. Until a pan-Canadian system is available, there will be a disparity of support for patients and practitioners across jurisdictions. iv) Respect Personal Convictions Finally, it is the CMA’s position that Bill C-14, to the extent constitutionally possible, must respect the personal convictions of health care providers. In the Carter decision, the Supreme Court of Canada emphasized that any regulatory or legislative response must seek to reconcile the Charter rights of patients wanting to access assisted dying and physicians who choose not to participate in medical assistance in dying on grounds of conscientious objection. The CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations achieves an appropriate balance between physicians’ freedom of conscience and the assurance of effective and timely patient access to a medical service. From the CMA’s significant consultation with our membership, it is clear that physicians who are comfortable providing referrals strongly believe it is necessary to ensure the system protects the conscience rights of physicians who are not. While the federal government has achieved this balance with Bill C-14, there is the potential for other regulatory bodies to implement approaches that may result in a patchwork system. The CMA’s position is that the federal government effectively mitigate this outcome by rapidly advancing the establishment of the pan-Canadian end-of-life care coordinating system. CMA Supports Cautious Approach for “Carter Plus” The CMA must emphasize the need for caution and careful study in consideration of “Carter Plus”, which includes: eligibility of mature minors, eligibility with respect to sole mental health conditions, and advance care directives. The CMA supports the federal government’s approach not to legislate these issues, rather to study them in greater detail. Word count: 750
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Medical assistance in dying education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11941
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
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The future of medicine

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy209
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2000-08-12
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2000-08-12
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
The future of medicine In 1997 the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) embarked on a study of the future of medicine. Two premises guided this activity: (1) the pace of change in the practice of medicine that physicians experienced in the last quarter of the 20th century is bound to increase in the 21st century; and (2) it is essential that the medical profession position itself to influence future developments in medical practice. In order to prepare the profession to anticipate and meet the challenges of the future, the CMA is engaged in a medium- to long-term (5–20 years) planning exercise. This policy statement summarizes the results of the first part of this exercise: working definitions of health, health care and medicine; a vision for the future of the medical profession; and the implications of this vision for the roles of physicians. This work was conducted by an expert project advisory group, which developed background papers on these topics and prepared this statement for approval by the CMA Board of Directors. Definitions Health: is a state of physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being. It is characterized in part by an absence of illness (a subjective experience) and disease (a pathological abnormality) that enables one to pursue major life goals and to function in personal, social and work contexts. Health care: is any activity that has as its primary objective the improvement, maintenance or support of physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being, as characterized by the absence of illness and disease. Medicine: is the art and science of healing. It is based on a body of knowledge, skills and practices concerned with the health and pathology of individuals and populations. The practice of medicine encompasses those health care activities that are performed by or under the direction of physicians in the service of patients, including health promotion, disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, education and research. A vision for the future of the medical profession Medicine will continue to be a healing profession dedicated to serving humanity. Its cornerstone will continue to be the relationship of trust between the patient and the physician. It will uphold with integrity the values of respect for persons, compassion, beneficence and justice. It will strive for excellence and incorporate progress in its art and science. It will maintain high standards of ethics, clinical practice, education and research in order to serve patients. It will encourage the development of healthy communities and of practices and policies that promote the well-being of the public. It will demonstrate its capacity for societal responsibility through self-regulation and accountability. It will actively participate in decision-making regarding health and health care policy. It will guard against forces and events that may compromise its primary commitment to the well-being of patients. The roles of physicians in the future1 Although the vision and values of medicine are enduring and will remain stable, the practice environment of physicians will change as the medical profession responds to health system and societal influences. This in turn will have implications for the roles of physicians. The traditional role of physicians has been medical expert and healer. This has involved diagnosing and treating disease and other forms of illness, comforting those who cannot be cured and preventing illness through patient counselling and public-health measures. While this role will remain at the core of medical practice, the evolving context of health care requires physicians to assume additional roles to support their primary role. The CMA proposes the following roles as essential to the future practice of medicine (cf. Fig. 1 for their interrelationship). Although no physician will function in all roles simultaneously, they should all have the fundamental competencies to participate in each of these roles. -Medical expert and healer: Physicians have always been recognized for their role as medical expert and healer; it is the defining nature of their practice and derives from the broad knowledge base of medicine and its application through a combination of art and science. This is the foundation for continued physician leadership in the provision of medical and health care in the future. -Professional: There must be renewed efforts to reaffirm the principles of the medical profession, including upholding its unique body of knowledge and skills; maintenance of high standards of practice; and commitment to the underlying values of caring, service and compassion. The medical profession of the future must continue to develop standards of care with ongoing opportunities for continued assessment of competency in order to remain a credible, self-regulated discipline worthy of public respect and trust. -Communicator: Increasing emphasis will be placed upon the ability to gather and communicate medical information in a compassionate and caring fashion, to enter into a partnership with patients when organizing care plans and to provide important information through counselling and the promotion of health. As always, the patient–physician relationship will remain paramount, with its essential features of compassion, confidentiality, honesty and respect. -Scholar: Scholarship involves the creation of new knowledge (research), its uniform application (clinical practice) and its transfer to others (education). It is this strong association with the science of medicine and physicians’ willingness to embrace the scholarship of their practice that is closely linked to their roles of medical experts and professionals. -Collaborator: Health care services will increasingly be provided by interdisciplinary teams throughout the continuum of care from health promotion activities to the management of acute life-threatening disorders to the delivery of palliative care. In the role of collaborator, physicians recognize the essential functions of other health care workers and respect unique provider contributions in patient-centred health care delivery. -Advocate: As the health sector becomes increasingly complex and interdependent with other sectors of society, it will be essential for physicians to play a greater role as health advocates. This may pertain to advocacy for individual and family health promotion in the practice environment; it may also relate to the promotion of improved health at the broader community level. -Manager: In order to provide quality care, physicians of the future must be effective resource managers at the individual practice level, at the health care facility level and as part of the wider health care system. In order to fulfil these roles and participate in communities as integral members of society, physicians need to lead balanced lives. Physicians may sometimes experience conflicts among these roles. The CMA Code of Ethics specifies the basic principles of professional ethics for dealing with such conflicts. Conclusion The CMA has developed this vision for the future of medicine and the future roles of physicians to assist individual physicians and medical organizations to anticipate and prepare for the challenges of the next 20 years. The vision provides the profession with criteria for evaluating proposed changes in how medicine is practised and reaffirms the core values of medicine that must be upheld in whatever system emerges. The CMA invites other organizations, nonmedical as well as medical, to comment on the contents of this statement and its implications for health and health care. The CMA welcomes opportunities to dialogue with others on how the health care system can be improved for the benefit of future patients and society in general. 1The section is indebted to the work of the Educating Future Physicians for Ontario (EFPO) project supported by the Associated Medical Services group, the Ontario faculties of medicine and the Ontario Ministry of Health, and the Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists 2000 (CanMEDs 2000) project of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.
Documents
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Principles for the development, use and evaluation of health care databases

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy579
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-26
That physicians, through the Canadian Medical Association, its Divisions and affiliates, should be involved in delineating principles to guide the development, use and evaluation of databases that provide linkages between health care utilization, socioeconomic status and other determinants of health and health status.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-26
That physicians, through the Canadian Medical Association, its Divisions and affiliates, should be involved in delineating principles to guide the development, use and evaluation of databases that provide linkages between health care utilization, socioeconomic status and other determinants of health and health status.
Text
That physicians, through the Canadian Medical Association, its Divisions and affiliates, should be involved in delineating principles to guide the development, use and evaluation of databases that provide linkages between health care utilization, socioeconomic status and other determinants of health and health status.
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Evidence and stakeholder involvement in the development of health policy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy580
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-27
That evidence-based approaches and wide stakeholder involvement are essential in the development and implementation of public policies designed to improve the health of the population both collectively and individually.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-27
That evidence-based approaches and wide stakeholder involvement are essential in the development and implementation of public policies designed to improve the health of the population both collectively and individually.
Text
That evidence-based approaches and wide stakeholder involvement are essential in the development and implementation of public policies designed to improve the health of the population both collectively and individually.
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Evolving patient-physician relationship

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy581
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-28
That the Canadian Medical Association explore the changing relationships of physicians with their patients and communities related to the expanding role of patients in decision-making and self-care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-28
That the Canadian Medical Association explore the changing relationships of physicians with their patients and communities related to the expanding role of patients in decision-making and self-care.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association explore the changing relationships of physicians with their patients and communities related to the expanding role of patients in decision-making and self-care.
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Evidence-based health-impact analysis and policy development

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy582
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-31
That the Canadian Medical Association and its Divisions urge government to establish a framework to ensure that the development and implementation of public policy is guided by evidence-based health-impact analysis.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-31
That the Canadian Medical Association and its Divisions urge government to establish a framework to ensure that the development and implementation of public policy is guided by evidence-based health-impact analysis.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association and its Divisions urge government to establish a framework to ensure that the development and implementation of public policy is guided by evidence-based health-impact analysis.
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Patient accountability and responsibility

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy587
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-44
That the Canadian Medical Association study ways in which the role of patient accountability and responsibility can be incorporated into models of health care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1997-08-20
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC97-44
That the Canadian Medical Association study ways in which the role of patient accountability and responsibility can be incorporated into models of health care.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association study ways in which the role of patient accountability and responsibility can be incorporated into models of health care.
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Gender-diversity policy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11894
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-24
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-24
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
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Palliative and end-of-life care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11895
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-52
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-52
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
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Medical tourism

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11896
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-25
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-25
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
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Unique challenges of managing pain in older adults

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11900
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-29
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-29
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
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Emergency health services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11914
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
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Eligibility criteria for blood donors

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11943
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-57
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-57
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
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Health and wellness plans for residents

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11944
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
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Wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11946
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
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Working and practice conditions of medical students and residents

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11947
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-80
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-80
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
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Open-licensing framework

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13631
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-59
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-59
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
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Quality End-of-Life Care report

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy388
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2000-08-16
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC00-19
That the Canadian Medical Association advise the Federal Minister of Health that it supports the recommendations of the Senate Standing Committee of the Senate "Quality End-of-Life Care" of June 2000, as appended to the Reports to General Council, and urge the government to work with provincial and territorial governments towards rapid implementation of the recommendations.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2000-08-16
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC00-19
That the Canadian Medical Association advise the Federal Minister of Health that it supports the recommendations of the Senate Standing Committee of the Senate "Quality End-of-Life Care" of June 2000, as appended to the Reports to General Council, and urge the government to work with provincial and territorial governments towards rapid implementation of the recommendations.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association advise the Federal Minister of Health that it supports the recommendations of the Senate Standing Committee of the Senate "Quality End-of-Life Care" of June 2000, as appended to the Reports to General Council, and urge the government to work with provincial and territorial governments towards rapid implementation of the recommendations.
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Allocation of health care resources

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy389
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2000-08-16
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC00-186
That the Canadian Medical Association work with its divisions and affiliates to determine and proclaim the values that should influence health care priority setting and allocation of health care resources in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2000-08-16
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC00-186
That the Canadian Medical Association work with its divisions and affiliates to determine and proclaim the values that should influence health care priority setting and allocation of health care resources in Canada.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association work with its divisions and affiliates to determine and proclaim the values that should influence health care priority setting and allocation of health care resources in Canada.
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20 records – page 1 of 1.