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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


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Supporting the enactment of Bill C-14, Medical Assistance in Dying

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13693
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2016-05-02
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2016-05-02
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
In this submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, the CMA’s feedback is focused on three of the legislative objectives of Bill C-14, given their relevance to the CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations for a Canadian Approach to Assisted Dying. On behalf of its more than 83,000 members and the Canadian public, the CMA performs a wide variety of functions. Key functions include advocating for health promotion and disease/injury prevention policies and strategies, advocating for access to quality health care, facilitating change within the medical profession, and providing leadership and guidance to physicians to help them influence, manage and adapt to changes in health care delivery. i) Robust Safeguards First, the CMA supports the legislative objective of ensuring a system of robust safeguards to the provision of medical assistance in dying. The safeguards proposed by Bill C-14 include: patient eligibility criteria, process requirements to request medical assistance in dying, as well as monitoring and reporting requirements. The CMA is a voluntary professional organization representing the majority of Canada’s physicians and comprising 12 provincial and territorial divisions and over 60 national medical organizations. ii) Consistent, Pan-Canadian Framework Second, the CMA supports the legislative objective that a consistent framework for medical assistance in dying in Canada is desirable. In addition to robust safeguards, key measures proposed by Bill C-14 support the promulgation of a consistent framework across jurisdictions include legislating definitions for “medical assistance in dying” and “grievous and irremediable condition.” The CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations reflect on the subjective nature of what constitutes “enduring and intolerable suffering” and a “grievous and irremediable condition” as well as the physician’s role in making an eligibility determination. iii) End-of-Life Care Coordination System Thirdly, the CMA supports the objective to develop additional measures to support the provision of a full range of options for end-of-life care and to respect the personal convictions of health care providers. The fulfilment of these commitments with federal non-legislative measures will be integral to supporting the achievement of access to care, respecting the personal convictions of health care providers, and developing a consistent, pan-Canadian framework. The CMA encourages the federal government to rapidly advance its commitment to engage the provinces and territories in developing a pan-Canadian end-of-life care coordinating system. It will be essential for this system to be in place for June 6, 2016. At least one jurisdiction has made a system available to support connecting patients with willing providers. Until a pan-Canadian system is available, there will be a disparity of support for patients and practitioners across jurisdictions. iv) Respect Personal Convictions Finally, it is the CMA’s position that Bill C-14, to the extent constitutionally possible, must respect the personal convictions of health care providers. In the Carter decision, the Supreme Court of Canada emphasized that any regulatory or legislative response must seek to reconcile the Charter rights of patients wanting to access assisted dying and physicians who choose not to participate in medical assistance in dying on grounds of conscientious objection. The CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations achieves an appropriate balance between physicians’ freedom of conscience and the assurance of effective and timely patient access to a medical service. From the CMA’s significant consultation with our membership, it is clear that physicians who are comfortable providing referrals strongly believe it is necessary to ensure the system protects the conscience rights of physicians who are not. While the federal government has achieved this balance with Bill C-14, there is the potential for other regulatory bodies to implement approaches that may result in a patchwork system. The CMA’s position is that the federal government effectively mitigate this outcome by rapidly advancing the establishment of the pan-Canadian end-of-life care coordinating system. CMA Supports Cautious Approach for “Carter Plus” The CMA must emphasize the need for caution and careful study in consideration of “Carter Plus”, which includes: eligibility of mature minors, eligibility with respect to sole mental health conditions, and advance care directives. The CMA supports the federal government’s approach not to legislate these issues, rather to study them in greater detail. Word count: 750
Documents
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Guidelines for Physicians in Interactions with Industry

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9041
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-12-01
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-12-01
Replaces
Physicians and the pharmaceutical industry (Update 2001)
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
GUIDELINES FOR PHYSICIANS IN INTERACTIONS WITH INDUSTRY The history of health care delivery in Canada has included interaction between physicians and the pharmaceutical and health supply industries; this interaction has extended to research as well as to education. Physicians understand that they have a responsibility to ensure that their participation in such collaborative efforts is in keeping with their primary obligation to their patients and duties to society, and to avoid situations of conflict of interest where possible and appropriately manage these situations when necessary. They understand as well the need for the profession to lead by example by promoting physician-developed guidelines. The following guidelines have been developed by the CMA to serve as a resource tool for physicians in helping them to determine what type of relationship with industry is appropriate. They are not intended to prohibit or dissuade appropriate interactions of this type, which have the potential to benefit both patients and physicians. Although directed primarily to individual physicians, including residents, and medical students, the guidelines also apply to relationships between industry and medical organizations. General Principles 1. The primary objective of professional interactions between physicians and industry should be the advancement of the health of Canadians. 2. Relationships between physicians and industry are guided by the CMA's Code of Ethics and by this document. 3. The practising physician's primary obligation is to the patient. Relationships with industry are inappropriate if they negatively affect the fiduciary nature of the patient-physician relationship. 4. Physicians should resolve any conflict of interest between themselves and their patients resulting from interactions with industry in favour of their patients. In particular, they must avoid any self-interest in their prescribing and referral practices. 5. Except for physicians who are employees of industry, in relations with industry the physician should always maintain professional autonomy and independence. All physicians should remain committed to scientific methodology. 6. Those physicians with ties to industry have an obligation to disclose those ties in any situation where they could reasonably be perceived as having the potential to influence their judgment. Industry-Sponsored Research 7. A prerequisite for physician participation in all research activities is that these activities are ethically defensible, socially responsible and scientifically valid. The physician's primary responsibility is the well-being of the patient. 8. The participation of physicians in industry sponsored research activities must always be preceded by formal approval of the project by an appropriate ethics review body. Such research must be conducted according to the appropriate current standards and procedures. 9. Patient enrolment and participation in research studies must occur only with the full, informed, competent and voluntary consent of the patient or his or her proxy, unless the research ethics board authorizes an exemption to the requirement for consent. In particular, the enrolling physician must inform the potential research subject, or proxy, about the purpose of the study, its source of funding, the nature and relative probability of harms and benefits, and the nature of the physician's participation and must advise prospective subjects that they have the right to decline to participate or to withdraw from the study at any time, without prejudice to their ongoing care. 10. The physician who enrolls a patient in a research study has an obligation to ensure the protection of the patient's privacy, in accordance with the provisions of applicable national or provincial legislation and CMA's Health Information Privacy Code. If this protection cannot be guaranteed, the physician must disclose this as part of the informed consent process. 11. Practising physicians should not participate in clinical trials unless the study will be registered prior to its commencement in a publicly accessible research registry. 12. Because of the potential to influence judgment, remuneration to physicians for participating in research studies should not constitute enticement. It may cover reasonable time and expenses and should be approved by the relevant research ethics board. Research subjects must be informed if their physician will receive a fee for their participation and by whom the fee will be paid. 13. Finder's fees, whereby the sole activity performed by the physician is to submit the names of potential research subjects, should not be paid. Submission of patient information without their consent would be a breach of confidentiality. Physicians who meet with patients, discuss the study and obtain informed consent for submission of patient information may be remunerated for this activity. 14. Incremental costs (additional costs that are directly related to the research study) must not be paid by health care institutions or provincial or other insurance agencies regardless of whether these costs involve diagnostic procedures or patient services. Instead, they must be assumed by the industry sponsor or its agent. 15. When submitting articles to medical journals, physicians must state any relationship they have to companies providing funding for the studies or that make the products that are the subject of the study whether or not the journals require such disclosure. Funding sources for the study should also be disclosed. 16. Physicians should only be included as an author of a published article reporting the results of an industry sponsored trial if they have contributed substantively to the study or the composition of the article. 17. Physicians should not enter into agreements that limit their right to publish or disclose results of the study or report adverse events which occur during the course of the study. Reasonable limitations which do not endanger patient health or safety may be permissible. Industry-Sponsored Surveillance Studies 18. Physicians should participate only in post-marketing surveillance studies that are scientifically appropriate for drugs or devices relevant to their area of practice and where the study may contribute substantially to knowledge about the drug or device. Studies that are clearly intended for marketing or other purposes should be avoided. 19. Such studies must be reviewed and approved by an appropriate research ethics board. The National Council on Ethics in Human Research is an additional source of advice. 20. The physician still has an obligation to report adverse events to the appropriate body or authority while participating in such a study. Continuing Medical Education / Continuing Professional Development (CME/CPD) 21. This section of the Guidelines is understood to address primarily medical education initiatives designed for practicing physicians. However, the same principles will also apply for educational events (such as noon-hour rounds and journal clubs) which are held as part of medical or residency training. 22. The primary purpose of CME/CPD activities is to address the educational needs of physicians and other health care providers in order to improve the health care of patients. Activities that are primarily promotional in nature, such as satellite symposia, should be identified as such to faculty and attendees and should not be considered as CME/CPD. 23. The ultimate decision on the organization, content and choice of CME/CPD activities for physicians shall be made by the physician-organizers. 24. CME/CPD organizers and individual physician presenters are responsible for ensuring the scientific validity, objectivity and completeness of CME/CPD activities. Organizers and individual presenters must disclose to the participants at their CME/CPD events any financial affiliations with manufacturers of products mentioned at the event or with manufacturers of competing products. There should be a procedure available to manage conflicts once they are disclosed. 25. The ultimate decision on funding arrangements for CME/CPD activities is the responsibility of the physician-organizers. Although the CME/CPD publicity and written materials may acknowledge the financial or other aid received, they must not identify the products of the company(ies) that fund the activities. 26. All funds from a commercial source should be in the form of an unrestricted educational grant payable to the institution or organization sponsoring the CME/CPD activity. 27. Industry representatives should not be members of CME content planning committees. They may be involved in providing logistical support. 28. Generic names should be used in addition to trade names in the course of CME/CPD activities. 29. Physicians should not engage in peer selling. Peer selling occurs when a pharmaceutical or medical device manufacturer or service provider engages a physician to conduct a seminar or similar event that focuses on its own products and is designed to enhance the sale of those products. This also applies to third party contracting on behalf of industry. This form of participation would reasonably be seen as being in contravention of the CMA's Code of Ethics, which prohibits endorsement of a specific product. 30. If specific products or services are mentioned, there should be a balanced presentation of the prevailing body of scientific information on the product or service and of reasonable, alternative treatment options. If unapproved uses of a product or service are discussed, presenters must inform the audience of this fact. 31. Negotiations for promotional displays at CME/CPD functions should not be influenced by industry sponsorship of the activity. Promotional displays should not be in the same room as the educational activity. 32. Travel and accommodation arrangements, social events and venues for industry sponsored CME/CPD activities should be in keeping with the arrangements that would normally be made without industry sponsorship. For example, the industry sponsor should not pay for travel or lodging costs or for other personal expenses of physicians attending a CME/CPD event. Subsidies for hospitality should not be accepted outside of modest meals or social events that are held as part of a conference or meeting. Hospitality and other arrangements should not be subsidized by sponsors for personal guests of attendees or faculty, including spouses or family members. 33. Faculty at CME/CPD events may accept reasonable honoraria and reimbursement for travel, lodging and meal expenses. All attendees at an event cannot be designated faculty. Faculty indicates a presenter who prepares and presents a substantive educational session in an area where they are a recognized expert or authority. Electronic Continuing Professional Development (eCPD) 34. The same general principles which apply to "live, in person" CPD events, as outlined above, also apply to eCPD (or any other written curriculum-based CPD) modules. The term "eCPD" generally refers to accredited on-line or internet-based CPD content or modules. However, the following principles can also apply to any type of written curriculum based CPD. 35. Authors of eCPD modules are ultimately responsible for ensuring the content and validity of these modules and should ensure that they are both designed and delivered at arms'-length of any industry sponsors. 36. Authors of eCPD modules should be physicians with a special expertise in the relevant clinical area and must declare any relationships with the sponsors of the module or any competing companies. 37. There should be no direct links to an industry or product website on any web page which contains eCPD material. 38. Information related to any activity carried out by the eCPD participant should only be collected, used, displayed or disseminated with the express informed consent of that participant. 39. The methodologies of studies cited in the eCPD module should be available to participants to allow them to evaluate the quality of the evidence discussed. Simply presenting abstracts that preclude the participant from evaluating the quality of evidence should be avoided. When the methods of cited studies are not available in the abstracts, they should be described in the body of the eCPD module. 40. If the content of eCPD modules is changed, re-accreditation is required. Advisory/Consultation Boards 41. Physicians may be approached by industry representatives and asked to become members of advisory or consultation boards, or to serve as individual advisors or consultants. Physicians should be mindful of the potential for this relationship to influence their clinical decision making. While there is a legitimate role for physicians to play in these capacities, the following principles should be observed: A. The exact deliverables of the arrangement should be clearly set out and put in writing in the form of a contractual agreement. The purpose of the arrangement should be exclusively for the physician to impart specialized medical knowledge that could not otherwise be acquired by the hiring company, and should not include any promotional or educational activities on the part of the company itself. B. Remuneration of the physician should be reasonable and take into account the extent and complexity of the physician's involvement. C. Whenever possible, meetings should be held in the geographic locale of the physician or as part of a meeting which he/she would normally attend. When these arrangements are not feasible, basic travel and accommodation expenses may be reimbursed to the physician advisor or consultant. Meetings should not be held outside of Canada, with the exception of international boards. Clinical Evaluation Packages (Samples) 42. The distribution of samples should not involve any form of material gain for the physician or for the practice with which he or she is associated. 43. Physicians who accept samples or other health care products are responsible for recording the type and amount of medication or product dispensed. They are also responsible for ensuring their age-related quality and security and their proper disposal. Gifts 44. Practising physicians should not accept personal gifts of any significant monetary or other value from industry. Physicians should be aware that acceptance of gifts of any value has been shown to have the potential to influence clinical decision making. Other Considerations 45. These guidelines apply to relationships between physicians and all commercial organizations, including but not limited to manufacturers of medical devices, nutritional products and health care products as well as service suppliers. 46. Physicians should not dispense pharmaceuticals or other products unless they can demonstrate that these cannot be provided by an appropriate other party, and then only on a cost-recovery basis. 47. Physicians should not invest in industries or related undertakings if this might inappropriately affect the manner of their practice or their prescribing behaviour. 48. Practising physicians affiliated with pharmaceutical companies should not allow their affiliation to influence their medical practice inappropriately. 49. Practising physicians should not accept a fee or equivalent consideration from pharmaceutical manufacturers or distributors in exchange for seeing them in a promotional or similar capacity. 50. Practising physicians may accept patient teaching aids appropriate to their area of practice provided these aids carry at most the logo of the donor company and do not refer to specific therapeutic agents, services or other products. Medical Students and Residents 51. The principles in these guidelines apply to physicians-in training as well as to practising physicians. 52. Medical curricula should deal explicitly with the guidelines by including educational sessions on conflict of interest and physician-industry interactions.
Documents
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Medical assistance in dying education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11941
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
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Fee for service

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy602
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1985-12-14
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
BD86-04-129
That charging the patient for services that are not benefits of the government medical insurance act is an ethical act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1985-12-14
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
BD86-04-129
That charging the patient for services that are not benefits of the government medical insurance act is an ethical act.
Text
That charging the patient for services that are not benefits of the government medical insurance act is an ethical act.
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Disclosure of peer review committee proceedings

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy803
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1985-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC85-35
That the Canadian Medical Association urge all provincial governments to adopt legislation which protects from disclosure, in legal actions, the proceedings of peer review committees evaluating and reviewing quality of care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1985-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC85-35
That the Canadian Medical Association urge all provincial governments to adopt legislation which protects from disclosure, in legal actions, the proceedings of peer review committees evaluating and reviewing quality of care.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association urge all provincial governments to adopt legislation which protects from disclosure, in legal actions, the proceedings of peer review committees evaluating and reviewing quality of care.
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Gender-diversity policy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11894
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-24
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-24
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
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Palliative and end-of-life care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11895
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-52
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-52
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
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Medical tourism

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11896
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-25
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-25
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
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Unique challenges of managing pain in older adults

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11900
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-29
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-29
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
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Emergency health services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11914
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
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Eligibility criteria for blood donors

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11943
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-57
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-57
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
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Health and wellness plans for residents

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11944
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
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Wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11946
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
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Working and practice conditions of medical students and residents

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11947
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-80
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-80
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
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Open-licensing framework

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13631
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-59
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-59
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
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Expanded scopes of practice

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8912
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-98
The Canadian Medical Association urges national specialty societies, faculties of medicine and educational colleges to develop a nationally coordinated strategy to provide physicians with access to enhanced skills training for expanded scopes of practice.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-98
The Canadian Medical Association urges national specialty societies, faculties of medicine and educational colleges to develop a nationally coordinated strategy to provide physicians with access to enhanced skills training for expanded scopes of practice.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges national specialty societies, faculties of medicine and educational colleges to develop a nationally coordinated strategy to provide physicians with access to enhanced skills training for expanded scopes of practice.
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Evaluation of international medical graduates

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8913
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC07-99
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national standardized assessment protocol to evaluate international medical graduates.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC07-99
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national standardized assessment protocol to evaluate international medical graduates.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports a national standardized assessment protocol to evaluate international medical graduates.
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Physician retention

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8926
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
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Physician advocates

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8927
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-113
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and advocate strongly for the implementation of policy to safeguard physicians from fear of reprisal and retaliation when speaking out as advocates for their patients and communities.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-113
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and advocate strongly for the implementation of policy to safeguard physicians from fear of reprisal and retaliation when speaking out as advocates for their patients and communities.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and advocate strongly for the implementation of policy to safeguard physicians from fear of reprisal and retaliation when speaking out as advocates for their patients and communities.
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Environmental stewardship

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8936
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-74
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-74
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
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