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182 records – page 1 of 10.

Committee Appearance – Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee: Bill C-7 – An Act to Amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14380

Date
2020-11-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2020-11-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
Committee Appearance – Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee: Bill C-7 – An Act to Amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying) November 23, 2020 Dr. Sandy Buchman Past President of the Canadian Medical Association Monday, November 23, 2020 Speaking Remarks ____________________________________________________________ Thank you, Madam Chair. I appear before the committee today as the past president of the Canadian Medical Association with the honour and responsibility of speaking for all our members - the frontline physicians. My name is Dr. Sandy Buchman. I am a palliative care physician in Toronto. I am also a MAiD Assessor and Provider. It is incumbent upon us now to consider the effects that the passing of Bill C-7 will have on patients, but also the effects on the medical professionals who provide medical assistance in dying - MAiD. When the original MAiD legislation was developed as Bill C-14, the CMA was a leading stakeholder. We have continued that commitment with Bill C-7. Having examined Bill C-7, we know that, in a myriad of ways, the results of our extensive consultations with our members align with the findings of the government’s roundtables. Nicole Gladu, whose name is now inextricably tied to the government’s decision on MAiD, spoke as unequivocally as perhaps anyone could when she affirmed that it is up to people like her, and I quote, “To decide if we prefer the quality of life to the quantity of life." Perhaps not everyone agrees with this sentiment. Few can argue, though, that it is a powerful reminder of the real stakeholders when it comes to considerations of this bill. This applies no less critically to those who are currently MAiD providers or those who will become providers. These practitioners are our members. But we can’t overlook the fact that there must be complete support of both patients and providers. Fundamentally, the CMA supports the government’s prudent and measured approach to responding to the Truchon-Gladu decision. This thoughtful and staged process undertaken by the government is consistent with the CMA’s position for a balanced approach to MAiD. Through our consultations however, we learned that many physicians felt there is a lack of overall clarity. Recent federal efforts to provide precision for physicians are exceedingly welcome. The CMA is pleased to see new non-legislative measures lending more consistency to the delivery of MAiD across the country. The quality and availability of palliative care, mental health care, and care and resources for those suffering from chronic illness, and for persons with disabilities, to ensure that all patients have access to other, appropriate health care services is crucial. The CMA remains firm on our convictions on MAiD from Bill C-14 to C-7. We believe that the choice of those Canadians who are eligible should be respected. We also believe that the rights of vulnerable Canadians must be protected. This demands strict attention to safeguards. And we believe that an environment must exist that fosters the insistence that practitioners abide by their moral commitments. Each of these three tenants is equally unassailable. Our members are in strong support of allowing advance requests by eligible patients who may lose capacity before MAiD can be provided. The CMA believes in the importance of safeguards to protect the rights of vulnerable Canadians and those who are eligible to seek MAiD. Expanding data collection to provide a more thorough account of MAiD in Canada is important. However, this effort must not create an undue administrative burden on physicians. The CMA views some of the language in the bill as precarious. The CMA recommends amending the language in section 2.1 which states “mental illness is not considered to be an illness, disease or disability” to avoid the unintended consequence of having a stigmatizing effect. The legislation should also clearly indicate that the exclusion is for mental illness as a sole underlying medical condition, not mental illness as a comorbidity. To be clear, the CMA is not recommending a revision to the legislative intent. We trust that Parliament will carefully consider the specific language used in the bill. Finally, the CMA endorses the government’s staged approach to carefully examine more complex issues. We must move forward, though, by ensuring that practitioners are given the tools that will be required to safely administer MAiD on a wider spectrum. Support for developing clinical practice guidelines that aid physicians in exercising sound clinical judgment are a prime example. Such guidance would also serve to reinforce consistency in the application of the legal criteria. In conclusion, Madam Chair, allow me to thank the committee for the invitation to participate in today’s proceedings. Sharing the perspective of Canada’s physicians is a privilege. That together we pursue a painless and dignified end-of-life is noble. The assurance that the providers of this practice are supported is an ethical imperative.

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Standing Committee on Health’s study on violence faced by healthcare workers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14052

Date
2019-05-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2019-05-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
Re: Standing Committee on Health’s study on violence faced by healthcare workers Dear Mr. Casey: I am writing on behalf of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) to submit recommendations for consideration by the Standing Committee on Health (the Committee) as part of the study on violence faced by healthcare workers. The CMA is deeply concerned with the state of workplace safety in all health care settings, including hospitals, long-term care, and home care settings. As in all experiences of violence, it is unacceptable for healthcare workers to be victims of violence in the provision of care to patients. While there is limited data nationally to understand the incidence of violence against healthcare workers, anecdotal evidence suggests that these experiences are increasing in frequency and severity. A 2010 survey of members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada shockingly found that, in the previous month, nearly one-third of respondents had been exposed to some form of aggressive behaviour from a patient (90%) or patient’s family (70%). The study concluded that “Canadian family physicians in active practice are subjected to regular abuse from their patients or family members of their patients.”1 These concerns were brought to the CMA’s General Council in 2015, where our members passed a resolution calling for: “the federal government to amend the Criminal Code by making it a specific criminal offence to assault health care providers performing their duties.” The CMA is prioritizing initiatives that support physician health and wellness. Increasingly, there is a recognition of the role of the workplace, primarily health care settings, and safe working conditions as having an important influence of physician health and wellness. …/2 1 Miedema BB, Hamilton R, Tatemichi S et al. Monthly incidence rates of abusive encounters for Canadian family physicians by patients and their families. Int J Family Med. 2010; 2010: 387202. Available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275928/pdf/IJFM2010-387202.pdf (accessed 2019 May 9). Mr. Bill Casey Addressing violence against providers in healthcare settings will require action from both federal and provincial/territorial governments. In light of the above, the CMA respectfully submits the following recommendations for consideration by the Committee in its study on violence against healthcare workers: 1) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support the call to amend the Criminal Code of Canada to introduce a new criminal offence for assault against a healthcare provider performing their duty. 2) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support establishing monitoring of violence against healthcare workers, that is consistent across jurisdictions, and have an active role in responding appropriately to trends. 3) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support federal leadership in a pan- Canadian approach to support workplace safety in healthcare settings, including collaborating with the provinces and territories to improve violence prevention. Finally, the CMA welcomes and supports the petition recently tabled in the House of Commons by Dr. Doug Eyolfson, calling for the Minister of Health “to develop a pan-Canadian prevention strategy to address growing incidents of violence against health care workers.” In closing, the CMA is encouraged that the Committee is undertaking this study. I look forward to the Committee’s report on this topic and the opportunity to collaborate on federal and provincial/territorial action in this matter. Sincerely, F. Gigi Osler, BScMed, MD, FRCSC President c.c.: Marilyn Gladu, M.P., Vice Chair, Standing Committee on Health Don Davies, M.P., Vice Chair Standing Committee on Health

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Cultural awareness

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13704

Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-16
The Canadian Medical Association encourages medical licensing bodies to require registrants to have training in cultural awareness.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-16
The Canadian Medical Association encourages medical licensing bodies to require registrants to have training in cultural awareness.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages medical licensing bodies to require registrants to have training in cultural awareness.
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Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13707

Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-09
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to support the Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (Bill S-201) by enacting corresponding legislation that echoes privacy protection.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-09
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to support the Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (Bill S-201) by enacting corresponding legislation that echoes privacy protection.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to support the Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (Bill S-201) by enacting corresponding legislation that echoes privacy protection.
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Victims of human trafficking

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13708

Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-17
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased physician awareness and education in identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-17
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased physician awareness and education in identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased physician awareness and education in identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking.
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Legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13720

Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-13
The Canadian Medical Association promotes legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees from arbitrary and indefinite detention in jails and jail-like facilities in Canada
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-13
The Canadian Medical Association promotes legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees from arbitrary and indefinite detention in jails and jail-like facilities in Canada
Text
The Canadian Medical Association promotes legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees from arbitrary and indefinite detention in jails and jail-like facilities in Canada
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Gender-diversity policy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11894

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-24
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-24
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a gender-diversity policy to increase representation in all levels of medical leadership.
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Palliative and end-of-life care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11895

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-52
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-52
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association acknowledges that palliative and end-of-life care has public health implications.
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Medical tourism

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11896

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-25
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-25
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for inclusion of the ethical and medicolegal aspects of medical tourism as part of the medical school curriculum.
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Unique challenges of managing pain in older adults

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11900

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-29
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-29
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends research into and education for health care providers concerning the unique challenges of managing pain in older adults.
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Emergency health services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11914

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
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Medical assistance in dying education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11941

Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of education and the development of Canadian accreditation elements related to medical assistance in dying for all medical students and resident physicians.
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Eligibility criteria for blood donors

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11943

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-57
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-57
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges Canadian blood service providers and Health Canada to adjust eligibility criteria for blood donors so that these criteria are behaviour-based and do not consider sexual orientation.
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Health and wellness plans for residents

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11944

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of health and wellness plans for residents that include tools for meditation and self-reflection.
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Wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11946

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-79
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of wellness and resiliency curricula in medical education and Canadian accreditation standards and elements.
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Working and practice conditions of medical students and residents

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11947

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-80
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-80
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will undertake a nationwide study to analyze the working and practice conditions of medical students and residents.
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Open-licensing framework

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13631

Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-59
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC16-59
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its subsidiaries will adopt an open-licensing framework to communicate which rights they reserve and which rights they waive for their products.
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Supporting the enactment of Bill C-14, Medical Assistance in Dying

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13693

Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2016-05-02
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2016-05-02
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
In this submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, the CMA’s feedback is focused on three of the legislative objectives of Bill C-14, given their relevance to the CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations for a Canadian Approach to Assisted Dying. On behalf of its more than 83,000 members and the Canadian public, the CMA performs a wide variety of functions. Key functions include advocating for health promotion and disease/injury prevention policies and strategies, advocating for access to quality health care, facilitating change within the medical profession, and providing leadership and guidance to physicians to help them influence, manage and adapt to changes in health care delivery. i) Robust Safeguards First, the CMA supports the legislative objective of ensuring a system of robust safeguards to the provision of medical assistance in dying. The safeguards proposed by Bill C-14 include: patient eligibility criteria, process requirements to request medical assistance in dying, as well as monitoring and reporting requirements. The CMA is a voluntary professional organization representing the majority of Canada’s physicians and comprising 12 provincial and territorial divisions and over 60 national medical organizations. ii) Consistent, Pan-Canadian Framework Second, the CMA supports the legislative objective that a consistent framework for medical assistance in dying in Canada is desirable. In addition to robust safeguards, key measures proposed by Bill C-14 support the promulgation of a consistent framework across jurisdictions include legislating definitions for “medical assistance in dying” and “grievous and irremediable condition.” The CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations reflect on the subjective nature of what constitutes “enduring and intolerable suffering” and a “grievous and irremediable condition” as well as the physician’s role in making an eligibility determination. iii) End-of-Life Care Coordination System Thirdly, the CMA supports the objective to develop additional measures to support the provision of a full range of options for end-of-life care and to respect the personal convictions of health care providers. The fulfilment of these commitments with federal non-legislative measures will be integral to supporting the achievement of access to care, respecting the personal convictions of health care providers, and developing a consistent, pan-Canadian framework. The CMA encourages the federal government to rapidly advance its commitment to engage the provinces and territories in developing a pan-Canadian end-of-life care coordinating system. It will be essential for this system to be in place for June 6, 2016. At least one jurisdiction has made a system available to support connecting patients with willing providers. Until a pan-Canadian system is available, there will be a disparity of support for patients and practitioners across jurisdictions. iv) Respect Personal Convictions Finally, it is the CMA’s position that Bill C-14, to the extent constitutionally possible, must respect the personal convictions of health care providers. In the Carter decision, the Supreme Court of Canada emphasized that any regulatory or legislative response must seek to reconcile the Charter rights of patients wanting to access assisted dying and physicians who choose not to participate in medical assistance in dying on grounds of conscientious objection. The CMA’s Principles-based Recommendations achieves an appropriate balance between physicians’ freedom of conscience and the assurance of effective and timely patient access to a medical service. From the CMA’s significant consultation with our membership, it is clear that physicians who are comfortable providing referrals strongly believe it is necessary to ensure the system protects the conscience rights of physicians who are not. While the federal government has achieved this balance with Bill C-14, there is the potential for other regulatory bodies to implement approaches that may result in a patchwork system. The CMA’s position is that the federal government effectively mitigate this outcome by rapidly advancing the establishment of the pan-Canadian end-of-life care coordinating system. CMA Supports Cautious Approach for “Carter Plus” The CMA must emphasize the need for caution and careful study in consideration of “Carter Plus”, which includes: eligibility of mature minors, eligibility with respect to sole mental health conditions, and advance care directives. The CMA supports the federal government’s approach not to legislate these issues, rather to study them in greater detail. Word count: 750

Documents

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Increased education and training in end- of-life care for community health care workers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11610

Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC15-34
The Canadian Medical Association encourages increased education and training in end- of-life care for community health care workers.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC15-34
The Canadian Medical Association encourages increased education and training in end- of-life care for community health care workers.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages increased education and training in end- of-life care for community health care workers.
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Assisted death as defined by the Supreme Court of Canada is distinct from the practice of palliative care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11611

Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC15-35
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes that the practice of assisted death as defined by the Supreme Court of Canada is distinct from the practice of palliative care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC15-35
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes that the practice of assisted death as defined by the Supreme Court of Canada is distinct from the practice of palliative care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes that the practice of assisted death as defined by the Supreme Court of Canada is distinct from the practice of palliative care.
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182 records – page 1 of 10.