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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


109 records – page 2 of 6.

Opioid overdose prevention supplies available in publicly accessible locations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13703
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC17-06
The Canadian Medical Association supports making naloxone and other opioid overdose prevention supplies available in publicly accessible locations.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC17-06
The Canadian Medical Association supports making naloxone and other opioid overdose prevention supplies available in publicly accessible locations.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports making naloxone and other opioid overdose prevention supplies available in publicly accessible locations.
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Cultural awareness

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13704
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-16
The Canadian Medical Association encourages medical licensing bodies to require registrants to have training in cultural awareness.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-16
The Canadian Medical Association encourages medical licensing bodies to require registrants to have training in cultural awareness.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages medical licensing bodies to require registrants to have training in cultural awareness.
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Management of chronic pain in older adults

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13705
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC17-07
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased approval and funding of pharmacologic options for the management of chronic pain in older adults.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC17-07
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased approval and funding of pharmacologic options for the management of chronic pain in older adults.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased approval and funding of pharmacologic options for the management of chronic pain in older adults.
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Nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13706
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-08
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-08
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
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Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13707
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-09
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to support the Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (Bill S-201) by enacting corresponding legislation that echoes privacy protection.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-09
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to support the Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (Bill S-201) by enacting corresponding legislation that echoes privacy protection.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to support the Federal Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (Bill S-201) by enacting corresponding legislation that echoes privacy protection.
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Victims of human trafficking

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13708
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-17
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased physician awareness and education in identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-17
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased physician awareness and education in identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports increased physician awareness and education in identifying and supporting victims of human trafficking.
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Federal excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages and artificially-sweetened drinks

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13709
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-10
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to implement a federal excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages and artificially-sweetened drinks sold in Canada to subsidize healthier food options.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-10
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to implement a federal excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages and artificially-sweetened drinks sold in Canada to subsidize healthier food options.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to implement a federal excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages and artificially-sweetened drinks sold in Canada to subsidize healthier food options.
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Antimicrobial stewardship and antimicrobial resistance surveillance

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13710
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC17-11
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to use Canada’s term as G7 President in 2018 to add antimicrobial stewardship and antimicrobial resistance surveillance as part of their agenda.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC17-11
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to use Canada’s term as G7 President in 2018 to add antimicrobial stewardship and antimicrobial resistance surveillance as part of their agenda.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to use Canada’s term as G7 President in 2018 to add antimicrobial stewardship and antimicrobial resistance surveillance as part of their agenda.
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Lack of access to insured health services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13711
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-12
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-12
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
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National guide on levels of medical intervention

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13712
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-18
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a national guide on levels of medical intervention for use across the continuum of care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-18
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a national guide on levels of medical intervention for use across the continuum of care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a national guide on levels of medical intervention for use across the continuum of care.
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A review of Canada’s medical liability system

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13713
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-19
The Canadian Medical Association supports a review of Canada’s medical liability system and an evaluation of alternative models.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-19
The Canadian Medical Association supports a review of Canada’s medical liability system and an evaluation of alternative models.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports a review of Canada’s medical liability system and an evaluation of alternative models.
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Mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13714
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
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Awareness of the difference between financial/insurance advisers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13715
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC17-21
The Canadian Medical Association will work with stakeholders in medical education to encourage awareness of the difference between non-commissioned financial/insurance advisers employed by national and provincial/territorial medical associations and commissioned financial/insurance advisers employed by banks and other corporations.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC17-21
The Canadian Medical Association will work with stakeholders in medical education to encourage awareness of the difference between non-commissioned financial/insurance advisers employed by national and provincial/territorial medical associations and commissioned financial/insurance advisers employed by banks and other corporations.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with stakeholders in medical education to encourage awareness of the difference between non-commissioned financial/insurance advisers employed by national and provincial/territorial medical associations and commissioned financial/insurance advisers employed by banks and other corporations.
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Electronic portal for medical organization

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13716
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-22
The Canadian Medical Association will create an electronic portal to allow medical organizations to upload their contact information.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-22
The Canadian Medical Association will create an electronic portal to allow medical organizations to upload their contact information.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will create an electronic portal to allow medical organizations to upload their contact information.
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Transferability of existing medical data

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13717
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-A26
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to ensure improved accessibility and transferability of existing medical data residing in electronic health records across provincial/interprovincial interfaces.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-A26
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to ensure improved accessibility and transferability of existing medical data residing in electronic health records across provincial/interprovincial interfaces.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to ensure improved accessibility and transferability of existing medical data residing in electronic health records across provincial/interprovincial interfaces.
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Physical activity history

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13719
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health information and e-health
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-25
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of physical activity history within the vital sign section of electronic medical record systems.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health information and e-health
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-25
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of physical activity history within the vital sign section of electronic medical record systems.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of physical activity history within the vital sign section of electronic medical record systems.
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Legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13720
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-13
The Canadian Medical Association promotes legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees from arbitrary and indefinite detention in jails and jail-like facilities in Canada
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-13
The Canadian Medical Association promotes legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees from arbitrary and indefinite detention in jails and jail-like facilities in Canada
Text
The Canadian Medical Association promotes legislative changes to protect migrants and refugees from arbitrary and indefinite detention in jails and jail-like facilities in Canada
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Innovative health system pilot projects in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13721
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC17-23
The Canadian Medical Association will support new projects and mechanisms to facilitate the expansion and increase the scale of innovative health system pilot projects in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC17-23
The Canadian Medical Association will support new projects and mechanisms to facilitate the expansion and increase the scale of innovative health system pilot projects in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will support new projects and mechanisms to facilitate the expansion and increase the scale of innovative health system pilot projects in Canada.
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Bill C-45: The Cannabis Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13723
Date
2017-08-18
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2017-08-18
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
The CMA is pleased to provide this submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health on Bill C-45, the Cannabis Act. The CMA has long-standing concerns about the health risks associated with consuming cannabis,i particularly in its smoked form.1,2 Children and youth are especially at risk for cannabis-related harms, given their brains are undergoing rapid and extensive development. i The term cannabis is used, as in Bill C-45: that is, referring to the cannabis plant or any substance or mixture that contains any part of the plant. ii The plant contains at least 750 chemicals, of which there are over 100 different cannabinoids. Madras BK. Update of cannabis and its medical use. Agenda item 6.2. 37th Meeting of the Expert Committee on 1 Canadian Medical Association. Health risks and harms associated with the use of marijuana. CMA submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health. Ottawa: The Association; 27 May 2014. Available: www.cma.ca/Assets/assets-library/document/en/advocacy/Brief-Marijuana-Health_Committee_May27-2014-FINAL.pdf (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 2 Canadian Medical Association. A public health perspective on cannabis and other illegal drugs. CMA submission to the Special Senate Committee on Illegal Drugs. Ottawa: The Association; 11 Mar 2002. Available: http://policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/BriefPDF/BR2002-08.pdf (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 3 Canadian Medical Association. Bill C-2 An Act to Amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (Respect for Communities Act). CMA submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security. Ottawa: The Association; 28 Oct 2014. Available: www.cma.ca/Assets/assets-library/document/en/advocacy/submissions/CMA_Brief_C-2_Respect%C3%A9-for_Communities_Act-English.pdf (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 4 Harm Reduction International. What is harm reduction? A position statement from Harm Reduction International. London, UK: Harm Reduction International; 2017. Available: www.hri.global/what-is-harm-reduction (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 5 Riley D, O’Hare P. Harm reduction: history, definition and practice. In: Inciardi JA, Harrison LD, editors. Harm reduction: national and international perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications; 2000. 6 Fischer B, Russel C, Sabioni P, et al. Lower-risk cannabis use guidelines: a comprehensive update of evidence and recommendations. Am J Public Health 2017;107(8):e1–e12. 7 Canadian Medical Association. Legalization, regulation and restriction of access to marijuana. CMA submission to the Government of Canada – Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation. Ottawa: The Association; 2016 Aug 29. Available: www.cma.ca/Assets/assets-library/document/en/advocacy/submissions/2016-aug-29-cma-submission-legalization-and-regulation-of-marijuana-e.pdf (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 8 Government of Canada. Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS): 2015 summary. Ottawa: Government of Canada; 2017. Available: www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/canadian-tobacco-alcohol-drugs-survey/2015-summary.html (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 9 Health Canada. Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey (CADUMS): summary of results for 2012. Ottawa: Health Canada; 2014. Available: www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/health-concerns/drug-prevention-treatment/drug-alcohol-use-statistics/canadian-alcohol-drug-use-monitoring-survey-summary-results-2012.html (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 10 World Health Organization. The health and social effects of nonmedical cannabis use. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2016. Available: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/251056/1/9789241510240-eng.pdf?ua=1 (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 11 Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation. A framework for the legalization and regulation of cannabis in Canada: final report. Ottawa: Health Canada; 2016. 12 Government of Canada. Legislative background: an Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts (Bill C-45). Ottawa: Government of Canada; 2017. 13 An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts, Bill C-45, First Reading 2017 Apr 13. 14 Crean RD, Crane NA, Mason BJ. An evidence based review of acute and long-term effects of cannabis use on executive cognitive functions. J Addict Med 2011;5(1):1–8. The CMA’s approach to cannabis is grounded in broad public health policy. It includes promotion of health and prevention of drug dependence and addiction; access to assessment, counselling and treatment services; and a harm reduction perspective. The CMA believes that harm reduction encompasses policies, goals, strategies and programs directed at decreasing adverse health, social and economic consequences of drug use for the individual, the community and the society while allowing the user to continue to use drugs, not precluding abstinence.3,4 Specifically, the CMA recommends a multi-faceted cannabis public health strategy that prioritizes impactful and realistic goals before, and certainly no later than, any legalization of cannabis.5 We propose that the first goal should be to develop educational interventions for children, teenagers and young adults. Other goals relate to data collection; monitoring and surveillance; ensuring a proportionate balance between enforcement harms and the direct and indirect harms caused by cannabis use; and research. There is an ongoing need for research into the medicinal and harmful effects of cannabis use. As noted by the Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines, 6 there is limited evidence on such subjects as synthetic cannabinoids; practices like “deep inhalation” to increase the psychoactive effects of cannabis; and the combination of risky behaviours, like early-onset and frequent use, associated with experiencing acute or chronic health problems.6 Since 2002, the CMA has taken a public health perspective regarding cannabis and other illegal drugs. More recently, the CMA endorsed the Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines, and we submitted 22 recommendations to the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation (“the Task Force”).7 Overview According to the recent Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey, cannabis is the most used illicit drug in Canada.8 In particular, 25%–30% of adolescents or youth report past-year cannabis use.9 This concerns the CMA. The increasing rate of high usage, despite the fact that non-medical use of cannabis is illegal, coupled with cannabis’ increased potency (from 2% in 1980 to 20% in 2015 in the United States),10 the complexity and versatility of the cannabis plant,ii the variable quality of the end product, and variations in the frequency, age of initiation Drug Dependence, Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products, World Health Organization; 2015. Available: www.who.int/medicines/access/controlled-substances/6_2_cannabis_update.pdf (accessed 2017 Jul 27). and method of use make it difficult to study the full health impacts and produce replicable, reliable scientific results. The CMA submits, therefore, that any legalization of cannabis for non-medical use must be guided by a comprehensive cannabis public health strategy and include a strong legal-regulatory framework emphasizing harm reduction principles. Given that the Task Force employed a minimizing of harms approach11 and given how the proposed legislation aligns with the Task Force’s recommendations,12 the bill addresses several aspects of a legal-regulatory framework “to provide legal access to cannabis and to control and regulate its production, distribution and sale.”13 This work provides the starting point for creating a national cannabis public health strategy. The CMA has long called for a comprehensive drug strategy that addresses addiction, prevention, treatment, enforcement and harm reduction.3 There are, however, key public health initiatives that the Canadian government has not adequately addressed and should be implemented before, or no later than, the implementation of legislation. One such initiative is education. Education is required to develop awareness among Canadians of the health, social and economic harms of cannabis use especially in young people. Supporting a Legal-Regulatory Framework that Advances Public Health and Protection of Children and Youth From a health perspective, allowing any use of cannabis by people under 25 years of age, and certainly those under 21 years of age, is challenging for physicians given the effects on the developing brain.1,3,14 The neurotoxic effect of cannabis, especially with persistent use, on the adolescent brain is more severe than on the adult brain.15,16 15 Meier MH, Caspi A, Ambler A, et al. Persistent cannabis users show neuropsychological decline from childhood to midlife. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2012;109(40):E2657–64 16 Crépault JF, Rehm J, Fischer B. The cannabis policy framework by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health: a proposal for a public health approach to cannabis policy in Canada. Int J Drug Policy 2016;34:1–4. 17 Pope HG Jr, Gruber AJ, Hudson JI, et al. Early-onset cannabis use and cognitive deficits: What is the nature of the association? Drug Alcohol Depend 2003;69(3):303–310. 18 Gruber SA, Sagar KA, Dahlgren MK, et al. Age of onset of marijuana use and executive function. Psychol Addict Behav 2011;26(3):496–506. 19 National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids: the current state of evidence and recommendations for research. Washington (DC): The National Academies Press; 2017. 20 Canadian Cancer Society. 2017 federal pre-budget submission. Canadian Cancer Society submission to the Standing Committee on Finance. 2014 Aug. Available: www.ourcommons.ca/Content/Committee/421/FINA/Brief/BR8398102/br-external/CanadianCancerSociety-e.pdf (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 21 Health Canada. Backgrounder: legalizing and strictly regulating cannabis: the facts. Ottawa: Health Canada; 2017. Available: www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2017/04/backgrounder_legalizingandstrictlyregulatingcannabisthefacts.html (accessed 2017 Jul 27) 22 Hall W, Degenhardt L. Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use. Lancet 2009;374(9698):1383–91. 23 Statistics Canada. Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health, 2012. The Daily. 2013 Sep 18. Statistics Canada cat. No. 11-001-X. Available: www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130918/dq130918a-eng.htm (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 24 Miech RA, Johnston LD, O’Malley PM, Bachman JG, Schulenberg, JE. Monitoring the future national survey results on drug use, 1975–2010. Vol 1: Secondary students. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan; 2011. 25 Spithoff S, Kahan M. Cannabis and Canadian youth: evidence, not ideology. Can Fam Physician 2014;60(9):785–7. 26 Health Canada. Strong foundation, renewed focus: an overview of Canada’s Federal Tobacco Control Strategy 2012–2017. Ottawa: Health Canada; 2012. Available: www.canada.ca/content/dam/canada/health-canada/migration/healthy-canadians/publications/healthy-living-vie-saine/tobacco-strategy-2012-2017-strategie-tabagisme/alt/tobacco-strategy-2012-2017-strategie-tabagisme-eng.pdf (accessed 2017 Jul 27). 27 Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, SC 1996, c 19, s 9. Further, neurological studies have shown that adolescent-onset cannabis use produces greater deficits in executive functioning and verbal IQ and greater impairment of learning and memory than adult-onset use.17,18 This underscores the importance of protecting the brain during development. Since current scientific evidence indicates that brain development is not completed until about 25 years of age,19 this would be the ideal minimum age for legal cannabis use. Youth and young adults are among the highest users of cannabis in Canada. Despite non-medical use of cannabis being illegal in Canada since 1923, usage has increased over the past few decades. The CMA recognizes that a blanket prohibition of possession for teenagers and young adults would not reflect current reality or a harm reduction approach.3 Harm reduction is not one of polarities rather it is about ensuring the quality and integrity of human life and acknowledging where the individual is at within his/her community and society at large.5 The possibility that a young person might incur a lifelong criminal record for periodic use or possession of small amounts of cannabis for personal use means that the long-term social and economic harms of cannabis use can be disproportionate to the drug’s physiological harm. The Canadian government has recognized this disproportionality for over 15 years. Since 2001, there have been two parliamentary committee reportsiii and two billsiv introduced to decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis (30 g). It was recommended that small amounts of cannabis possession be a “ticketable” offence rather than a criminal one. iii House of Commons Special Committee on the Non-Medical Use of Drugs (2001) and the Senate Special Committee on Illegal Drugs (2002). iv An Act to amend the Contraventions Act and the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (Bill C-38), which later was reintroduced as Bill C-10 in 2003. v For example, the Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP), a federal contributions program, is delivered by Health Canada to strengthen responses to drug and substance use issues in Canada. See Government of Canada. Substance Use and Addictions Program. Ottawa: Health Canada; 2017. Available: www.canada.ca/en/services/health/campaigns/canadian-drugs-substances-strategy/funding/substance-abuse-addictions-program.html (accessed 2017 Jul 27). Given all of the above, the CMA recommends that the age of legalization should be 21 years of age and that the quantities and the potency of cannabis be more restricted to those under age 25. Supporting a Comprehensive Cannabis Public Health Strategy with a Strong, Effective Education Component The CMA recognizes that Bill C-45 repeals the prohibition against simple possession while increasing penalties against the distribution and sale of cannabis to young people, but this is not enough to support a harm reduction approach. We note that the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy, with its $38 million budget, is intended to help reduce smoking rates and change Canadians’ perceptions toward tobacco.20 Similarly, there are extensive education programs concerning the dangers of alcohol, particularly for young people.v The government of Canada has proposed a modest commitment of $9.6 million to a public awareness campaign to inform Canadians, especially youth, of the risks of cannabis consumption, and to surveillance activities.21 A harm reduction strategy should include a hierarchy of goals with an immediate focus on groups with pressing needs. The CMA submits that young people should be targeted first with education. The lifetime risk of dependence to cannabis is estimated at 9%, increasing to almost 17% in those who initiate use in adolescence.22 In 2012, about 1.3% of people aged 15 years and over met the criteria for cannabis abuse or dependence — double the rate for any other drug — because of the high prevalence of cannabis use.23 The strategy should include the development of educational interventions, including skills-based training programs, social marketing interventions and mass media campaigns. Education should focus not only on cannabis’ general risks but also on its special risks for the young and its harmful effects on them. This is critical given that for many, the perception is that (i) legalization of possession for both adults and young people translates into normalization of use and (ii) government control over the source of cannabis for sale translates into safety of use. Complicating this has been the fear-mongering messaging associated with illegal drugs. The evidence shows that fewer adolescents today believe that cannabis use has any serious health risks24 and that enforcement policies have not been a deterrent.25 Having an appropriate education strategy rolled out before legalization of possession would reduce the numbers of uninformed young recreational users. It would also provide time to engage in meaningful research on the impact of the drug on youth. Such strategies have been successful in the past; for example, the long-termvi Federal Tobacco Control Strategy has been credited with helping reduce smoking rates to an all-time low in Canada.26 vi The Federal Tobacco Control Strategy was initiated in 2001 for 10 years and renewed in 2012 for another five years. The Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines were developed as a “science-based information tool for cannabis users to modify their use toward reducing at least some of the health risks.”6 The CMA urges the government to support the widespread dissemination of this tool and incorporation of its messages into educational efforts. Other strategies must include plain packaging and labelling with health information and health warnings. Supporting a One-System Approach. Alternatively, a Review of Legislation in Five Years The CMA believes that once the act is in force, there will be little need for two systems (i.e., one for medical and one for non-medical cannabis use). Cannabis will be available for those who wish to use it for medicinal purposes, either with or without medical authorization (some people may self-medicate with cannabis to alleviate symptoms but may be reluctant to raise the issue with their family physician for fear of being stigmatized), and for those who wish to use it for other purposes. The medical profession does not need to continue to be involved as a gatekeeper once cannabis is legal for all, especially given that cannabis has not undergone Health Canada’s usual pharmaceutical regulatory approval process. The Task Force’s discussion reflects the tension it heard between those who advocated for one system and those who did not. One concern raised by patients was about the stigma attached to entering retail outlets selling non-medical cannabis. The CMA submits that this concern would be alleviated if the federal government continued the online purchase and mail order system that is currently in place. Given that there is a lack of consensus and insufficient data to calculate how much of the demand for cannabis will be associated with medical authorization, the Task Force recommended that two systems be established, with an obligation to review — specifically, a program evaluation of the medical access framework in five years.11 If there are two systems, then in the alternative, the CMA recommends a review of the legislation within five years. This would allow time to ensure that the provisions of the act are meeting their intended purposes, as determined by research on the efficacy of educational efforts and other research. Five-year legislative reviews have been previously employed, especially where legislation must balance individual choice with protecting public health and public safety.vii For example, like Bill C-45, the purpose of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act is to protect public health and public safety.27 Its review within five years is viewed as allowing for a thorough, evidence-based analysis to ensure that the provisions and operations of the act are meeting their intended purpose(s).viii Furthermore, a harm reduction approach lends itself to systematic evaluation of the approach’s short- and long-term impact on the reduction of harms.5 vii Several federal acts contain review provisions. Some examples include the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, SC b1996, c 19, s 9 (five-year review); the Preclearance Act, SC 1999, c 20, s 39 (five-year review); the National Defence Act, RSC 1985, c N-5, s 273.601(1) (seven-year review); the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act, SC 2005, c 46, s 54 (five-year review); and the Red Tape Reduction Act, SC 2015, c 12 (five-year review). viii The 2012 amendments to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act were adopted from Bill S-10, which died on order papers in March 2011. The Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs reviewed Bill S-10 and recommended that the review period should be extended from two to five years as two years is not sufficient to allow for a comprehensive review. See Debates of the Senate, 40th Parliament, 3rd Session, No 147:66 (2010 Nov 17) at 1550; see also Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, Eleventh Report: Bill S-10, An Act to Amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to Make Related and Consequential Amendments to Other Acts, with Amendments (2010 Nov 4). The CMA, therefore, submits that if a two-system approach is implemented when the legislation is enacted, the legislation should be amended to include the requirement for evaluation within five years of enactment. Criteria for evaluation may include the number of users in the medical system and the number of physicians authorizing medical cannabis use. The CMA would expect to be involved in the determination of such criteria and evaluation process. Conclusion Support has risen steadily in Canada and internationally for the removal of criminal sanctions for simple cannabis possession, as well as for the legalization and regulation of cannabis’ production, distribution and sale. The CMA has long-standing concerns about the health risks associated with consuming cannabis, especially by children and youth in its smoked form. Weighing societal trends against the health effects of cannabis, the CMA supports a broad legal-regulatory framework as part of a comprehensive and properly sequenced public health approach of harm reduction. Recommendations 1. The CMA recommends that the legalization age be amended to 21 years of age, to better protect the most vulnerable population, youth, from the developmental neurological harms associated with cannabis use. 2. The CMA recommends that a comprehensive cannabis public health strategy with a strong, effective health education component be implemented before, and no later than, the enactment of any legislation legalizing cannabis. 3a. The CMA recommends that there be only one regime for medical and non-medical use of cannabis, with provisions for the medical needs of those who would not be able to acquire cannabis in a legal manner (e.g., those below the minimum age). 3b. Alternatively, the CMA recommends that the legislation be amended to include a clause to review the legislation, including a review of having two regimes, within five years.
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CMA response to patented medicines regulations consultations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13690
Date
2017-06-28
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2017-06-28
Topics
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
To Whom It May Concern: The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide its comments with respect to Health Canada’s Patented Medicines Regulations Consultations. The CMA is the national voice of Canadian physicians. Founded in 1867, the CMA’s mission is helping physicians care for patients. The CMA is a voluntary professional organization representing the majority of Canada’s physicians and comprising 12 provincial and territorial divisions and over 60 national medical organizations. As the second-largest share of total health expenditures in Canada, forecast to be 16% in 2016, the cost of drugs is of significant concern to physicians.1 In 2014, 42.6% of prescribed drug spending ($12.5 billion) came from the public sector.2 Pharmaceuticals play an important role in overcoming disease and maintaining health but access to these drugs can be problematic outside of hospital care due to their cost. This is why the CMA has called for a pan-Canadian system of catastrophic coverage for prescription drugs.3 We viewed this as a step toward the development of comprehensive, universal coverage for prescription medicines in Canada.4 1 CIHI. National Health Expenditure Trends 1975-2016, December 15, 2016 2 Ibid 3 Canadian Medical Association (CMA). A New Vision for Health Care in Canada: Addressing the Needs of an Aging Population. 2016 Pre-budget Submission to the Minister of Finance. Ottawa: The Association; 2016 Feb 12 4 Ibid In its brief to the Commission of Inquiry on the Pharmaceutical Industry in August, 1984, the CMA stated that we “fully support the objective of providing prescription drugs to patients at the lowest possible cost that is consistent with wise health care delivery.”5 This remains our objective. This submission will address the proposed improvements to the regulations raised in the consultation document from a broad perspective. 5 Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Brief to the Commission of Inquiry on the Pharmaceutical Industry August 15, 1984 6 Gray C. Patented drugs: Is the price right? CMAJ 1998 158:1645 7 Silversides A. Monitoring the price of new drugs CMAJ 2006 174(11):1548-1549 8 The Commission of Inquiry on the Pharmaceutical Industry. The Report of the Commission of Inquiry on the Pharmaceutical Industry H.C. Eastman, Commissioner. Ottawa Minister of Supply and Services 1985 p. 347 9 Industry Canada. Pharmaceutical industry profile. https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/lsg-pdsv.nsf/eng/h_hn01703.html (Accessed 2017 June 20) 10 Morgan SG, Leopold C, Wagner AK. Drivers of expenditures on primary care prescription drugs in 10 high-income countries with universal health coverage. CMAJ 2017;189:E794-9 Economic Considerations The ability of the PMPRB to monitor drug prices has long been the subject of review and concern.6,7 The CMA is pleased that the Government of Canada is undertaking this review to provide the Patented Medicines Prices review Board (PMPRB) with a new regulatory framework to protect Canadians from excessive prices and improving the regulatory process. The board needs to use every economic measure and tool at its disposal to ensure Canadians pay fair and equitable prescription drug prices. As the Eastman Commission pointed out in its 1985 report, “Canadian consumption is a small proportion of world consumption so that Canadian patent policy has little effect on the world-wide profitability of the pharmaceutical industry.”8 Indeed, Canadian pharmaceutical sales represent 2% of the global market which makes us the tenth largest world market.9 Yet our small size with respect to the global market has not shielded us from high prices. For example, a recent study found that although the volume of therapies purchased in Canada across six classes of “primary care medicines” was similar, we paid an estimated $2.3 billion more for them in 2015 than if these treatments had the “same average cost per day in Canada as in the nine comparator countries combined.”10 Prescription medication spending is an issue for many Canadians, especially when it has an impact on compliance with prescription regimes, an unintended consequence of the manner in which the board’s regulatory framework has been applied. On the Commonwealth Fund’s 2013 International Health Policy Survey, 8% of the Canadian respondents said that they had either not filled a prescription or skipped doses because of cost issues.11 Himmelstein et al. reported on a survey of Canadians who experienced bankruptcy between 2008 and 2010. They found that 74.5% of the respondents who had had a medical bill within the last two years reported that prescription drugs was their biggest medical expense.12 11 Schoen C, Osborn R, Squires D, Doty M. Access, affordability, and insurance complexity are often worse in the United States compared to ten other countries. Health Affairs 2013;32(12):2205-15. 12 Himmelstein D, Woolhandler S, Sarra J, Guyatt G. Health issues and health care expenses in Canadian bankruptices and insolvencies. International Journal of Health Services 2014;44(1):7-23. 13 Vebeeten D, Astiles P, Prada, G. Understanding Health and Social Services for seniors in Canada. Ottawa: The Conference Board of Canada, 2015. 14 Ibid 15 Ibid 16 Morgan SG, Lee A. Cost-related non-adherence to prescribed medicines among older adults: a cross-sectional analysis of a survey in 11 developed countries BMJ Open 2017;7: e014287. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014287 (access 2017 Jun 16) 17 Zhang R., Martin D., Naylor CD., Regulator or regulatory shield? The case for reforming Canada’s Patented Medicines Prices review Board. CMAJ 2017 April 10;189:E515-6. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.161355 The CMA is especially worried about the impact high drug costs have on seniors in the absence of universal drug coverage. They have access to some level of drug coverage in all provinces and territories but it is not even.13 Eight provinces have an income-test that determines the deductibles they will pay while in two they pay a small portion of the cost with the province or a third-party insurer covering the rest.14 All three territories have plans for those who qualify but the provisions may be limited.15 A recent study found that older Canadian adults (55 and older) had the second-highest prevalence (8.3%) of cost-related non-adherence (CRNA) for prescribed medications.16 CRNA was higher among those with lower incomes and lower among those over 65. Finally, the CMA remains very concerned about ongoing shortages of prescription drugs. We would caution that whatever measures the government undertakes to strengthen and improve the PMPRB do not exacerbate drug shortages. International Comparisons The PMPRB’s current benchmark “that Canadian prices for patented drugs should be less than the median of prices in selected comparison countries” places us at a distinct disadvantage.17 As the authors note, “it puts Canada well above the OECD average by aligning Canada with countries that spend more from the outset.”18 The PMBRB should expand its range of comparator countries beyond those identified originally (France, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States) to include those OECD countries with middle to low patent drug pricing.19 18 Ibid 19 Ibid 20 Ibid Furthermore, to ensure that the process is clear and transparent for Canadians, the PMPRB should “set prices closer to what comparator countries actually pay for their drugs as opposed to the “sticker” prices that most commonly represent the starting point for confidential negotiations.”20 Canadians deserve that much after years of paying such high prices for their patented medicines. The CMA is very concerned about the cost of medications. In the absence of universal drug coverage and, at a minimum, a pan-Canadian system of catastrophic coverage of prescription drug costs, a strengthened and robust regulatory framework for the pricing of patented medicines in Canada is crucial. The CMA calls on the federal government to revise the PMPRB regulations such that it provides Canadians with transparency and clarity around the setting of patented medicines prices while achieving the lowest costs possible and ensuring we continue to have access to a wide array of pharmaceutical products. Sincerely, Granger R. Avery, MB BS, FRRMS President
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109 records – page 2 of 6.