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Health Canada consultation on proposed vaping products promotion regulations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14128
Date
2020-01-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2020-01-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
Since 1867, the Canadian Medical Association has been the national voice of Canada’s medical profession. We work with physicians, residents and medical students on issues that matter to the profession and the health of Canadians. We advocate for policy and programs that drive meaningful change for physicians and their patients The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) appreciates this opportunity to respond to the notice as published in the Canada Gazette, Part 1 for interested stakeholders to provide comments on Health Canada’s proposed Vaping Products Promotion Regulations “that would (1) prohibit the promotion of vaping products and vaping product-related brand elements by means of advertising that is done in a manner that can be seen or heard by young persons, including the display of vaping products at points of sale where they can be seen by young persons; and (2) require that all vaping advertising convey a health warning about the health hazards of vaping product use.” Canada’s physicians, who see the devastating effects of tobacco use every day in their practices, have been working for decades toward the goal of a smoke-free Canada. The CMA issued its first public warning concerning the hazards of tobacco in 1954 and has continued to advocate for the strongest possible measures to control its use. The CMA has always, and will continue to support, strong, comprehensive tobacco control legislation, enacted and enforced by all levels of government. This includes electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Our approach to tobacco and vaping products is grounded in public health policy. We believe it is incumbent on governments in Canada to continue working on comprehensive, coordinated and effective tobacco control strategies, including vaping products, to achieve the goal of reducing smoking prevalence. Introduction It is imperative that the regulations concerning the promotion of vaping products be tightened sooner rather than later. While the CMA views Health Canada’s proposed regulations as a step in the right direction, they should only be considered as the start of extensive regulatory, policy and public health work required to effectively address the harms associated with vaping. Vaping is not without risks. Evidence continues to grow about the hazards associated with the use of e-cigarettes, especially for youth and young adults. The emergence of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) in the United States and to a lesser extent in Canada, illustrates the danger these products can pose. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that as of January 7, 2020 that there were 2,602 cases of hospitalized EVALI or deaths (57 so far) reported by all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 2 U.S. territories (Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). In an update published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, “younger age was significantly associated with acquiring THC-containing and nicotine-containing products through informal sources.” The report concludes with this warning: “Irrespective of the ongoing investigation, e-cigarette, or vaping, products should never be used by youths, young adults, or pregnant women.”3 In Canada, as of January 7, 2020, 15 cases of severe pulmonary illness associated with vaping have been reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada. A recent public opinion survey conducted by the Angus Reid Institute (ARI) indicates that Canadians are growing more concerned about the safety of vaping as more information on the potential harms becomes available. The survey found that the number of people saying that vaping does more harm than good rose from 35% in 2018 to 62% in 2019.5 Further, 17% of parents with children under 19 said their child either vaped or had tried it; 92% of those parents considered vaping harmful.5 Significant to this discussion is the fact that 90% of respondents support “banning advertisements of vaping products in areas frequented by young people. This includes areas such as bus shelters or parks, and digital spaces like social media.”5 As public unease continues to rise, the need for further tightening of regulations becomes vital. Unfortunately, the federal government is still behind the curve when it comes to the proliferation of vaping and the vaping industry. Health Canada will have to step up surveillance and enforcement if tightening of the regulations is to be effective. This brief will address the planned regulations as well as discuss important issues not covered such as nicotine levels and flavours. We have expressed concerns about these topics in previous consultations and will be reiterating them here. Promotion of Vaping Products The CMA appreciates Health Canada’s intent to tighten the regulations but this proposal is not sufficient, and we must reiterate our long-held position that the restrictions on the promotion of all vaping products and devices be the same as those for tobacco products. , The proposed regulations provides the vaping industry with too much latitude in their promotion activities to ensure youth are protected. As we noted in our response to Health Canada’s consultation on The Impact of Vaping Products Advertising on Youth and Nonusers of Tobacco Products, the advertisements that have been permitted to this point seem to have managed to find their way to youth, even if they are not directed at them, as has been asserted.7, We recommended vaping advertisements should not be permitted in any public places, broadcast media, and in publications of any type, with no exceptions. The CMA stands by that recommendation.7 The methods used by the vaping industry in the past succeeded in attracting more and more youth and young adults and it will no doubt continue efforts to find novel approaches for promoting their products, including the use of popular social media channels. , , , Indeed, “JUUL’s™ advertising imagery in its first 6 months on the market was patently youth oriented. For the next 2 ½ years it was more muted, but the company’s advertising was widely distributed on social media channels frequented by youth, was amplified by hashtag extensions, and catalyzed by compensated influencers and affiliates.”10 The vaping industry’s efforts to circumvent marketing restrictions in other jurisdictions are evident in view of some recent developments. A US study outlines an e-cigarette marketing technique that involves the promotion of scholarships for students. The study found 21 entities (manufacturers, e-cigarette review websites, distributors) offering 40 scholarships, ranging in value from $300 to $5000 (US).13 Most of the scholarships required “an essay submission, with most listing prompts related to e-cigarettes or eliciting information about the benefits of vaping.”13 The authors suggest “that prohibitions on e-cigarette scholarships to youth are also needed, as many of these scholarships require youth under the age of 18 years (for whom use of e-cigarettes are illegal) to write positive essays about vaping.”13 Health Warnings The CMA reiterates, yet again, its position that all health warnings for vaping products and devices should be similar to those presently required for tobacco packages in Canada.6, The need for such cautions is important in that we still do not understand fully the effects vaping can have on the human body. Harms More research is needed into the potential harms of using electronic cigarettes to understand the long-term effects users may face. , , The proposed health warnings are not strong enough in light of the research and knowledge that has emerged to date about the harms caused by e-cigarettes. For example, a recent US study highlighted the potential link between e-cigarette use and depression. It found “a significant cross-sectional association between e-cigarette use and depression, which highlights the need for prospective studies analyzing the longitudinal risk of depression with e-cigarette use.”18 As the authors note, “the potential mental health consequences may have regulatory implications for novel tobacco products.”18 Further, with respect to respiratory issues, a US study found that “use of e-cigarettes appears to be an independent risk factor for respiratory disease in addition to all combustible tobacco smoking.” The authors also don’t recommend the use of e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool because “for most smokers, using an e-cigarette is associated with lower odds of successfully quitting smoking.”19 Nicotine Levels Nicotine levels and flavours are not addressed in this consultation. However, the CMA considers these issues to be vital in the effort to protect youth and young adults from the harms associated with e-cigarettes and will therefore provide comment in effort to speed movement toward resolving these problems. The CMA remains very concerned about the rising levels of nicotine available through the vaping process. They supply “high levels of nicotine with few of the deterrents that are inherent in other tobacco products. Traditional e-cigarette products use solutions with free-base nicotine formulations in which stronger nicotine concentrations can cause aversive user experiences.” Hammond et al noted in their 2019 study that “JUUL® uses benzoic acid and nicotine salt technology to deliver higher concentrations of nicotine than conventional e-cigarettes; indeed, the nicotine concentration in the standard version of JUUL® is more than 50 mg/mL, compared with typical levels of 3-24 mg/mL for other e-cigarettes.”9 The salts and flavours available to be used with these devices reduce the harshness and bitterness of the taste of the e-liquids with some of the competition delivering even higher levels of nicotine. The CMA called on Health Canada to restrict the level of nicotine in vaping products to avoid youth (and adults) from developing a dependence.20 Health Canada set the maximum level at 66 mg/ml while a European Union (EU) directive of 2014 indicates the level should not exceed 20 mg/ml. , Nicotine, among other issues, “affects the developing brain by increasing the risk of addiction, mood disorders, lowered impulse control, and cognitive impairment. , Utilizing the EU level as an interim measure until more scientific research is available to determine an optimal level is acceptable. Flavours On December 5, 2019, the Government of Nova Scotia became the first province or territory to announce it would institute a ban on sale of flavoured e-cigarettes and juices, as of April 1, 2020. The CMA recommends that flavours banned to reduce the attractiveness of vaping to youth as much as possible; others share this sentiment.6,7, Flavours are strong factors in attracting youth, especially when coupled with assertions of lower harm. Their success in doing so is evidenced by the rise in the rates of vaping among youth.9, A recent US study found that “perceiving flavored e-cigarettes as easier to use than unflavored e-cigarettes may lead to e-cigarette use progression among youth never tobacco users. Determining the factors (including e-cigarette marketing and specific e-cigarette flavors) that lead to perceived ease of using flavored e-cigarettes would inform efforts to prevent and curb youth e-cigarette use.” The CMA recommends that flavours be banned to reduce the attractiveness of vaping to youth as much as possible. Recommendations 1. The CMA recommends that vaping advertisements should not be permitted in any public places, broadcast media, and in publications of any type, with no exceptions. 2. The CMA reiterates its position that all health warnings for vaping products and devices should be similar to those for tobacco packages. 3. The CMA believes that the European Union 2014 directive indicating the nicotine concentration not exceed 20 mg/ml should be adopted as an interim measure until more scientific research is available to determine an optimum level. 4. CMA recommends flavours be banned to reduce the attractiveness of vaping to youth as much as possible.
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Response to the consultation paper Pension Innovation for Canadians: The Target benefit plan

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11213
Date
2014-06-23
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2014-06-23
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide the comments below in response to Finance Canada's consultation document Pension Innovation for Canadians: The Target Benefit Plan. The CMA is the professional voluntary association representing over 80,000 physicians across Canada. Its mission is to serve and unite the physicians of Canada and to be the national advocate, in partnership with the people of Canada, for the highest standards of health and health care. The CMA has participated in, and made recommendations to, Finance Canada over the course of the government's multi-year consultation process on Canada's pension framework. Indeed, in light of the importance of the pension framework to our membership, the CMA has been an active participant in previous consultations regarding the pension framework. The CMA's participation in the current, multi-year initiative included responding to the 2010 consultative paper Ensuring the Ongoing Strength of Canada's Retirement Income System as well as participating in the legislative and regulatory consultation on the Pooled Registered Pension Plan (PRPP) framework. While the CMA recognizes that this consultation is focused narrowly on the federally regulated pension plans governed by the Pension Benefits Standards Act 1985, the CMA supports additional consultation on Canada's pension framework. The CMA recommends that Finance Canada expand its consultation to explore options to address weaknesses in Canada's pension framework, including a focus on the third pillar: tax-incentivized savings vehicles. As part of a consultation on the third pillar, the CMA recommends that Finance Canada explore three issues, as elaborated further below: * Increasing the combined contribution limit for registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs); * Enabling well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership as pension plan sponsors; and, * Possible impacts of registered retirement income funds (RRIF) mandatory drawdown rates. Like the Canadian population at large, physicians represent an aging demographic - 42% of Canada's physicians are 55 or older - for whom retirement planning is an important concern. In addition, the vast majority of CMA members are self-employed physicians and, as such, they are unable to participate in workplace registered pension plans (RPPs). This makes physicians more reliant on Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) relative to other retirement savings vehicles. The Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Research presented to the F/P/T Ministers of Finance in 2009, suggests that higher-earning Canadians may not be saving enough for retirement. This report highlighted that income replacement rates in retirement fall below 60 per cent of after-tax income for about 35 per cent of Canadians in the upper income quintile. This is related to the effect of maximum contribution limits on tax-incentivized retirement savings vehicles. Tax-incentivized private saving vehicles are a critical element of Canada's pension framework. As highlighted in the 2010 interim report of the Senate Banking Trade and Commerce Canadians Savings for Their Future: A Secure Retirement, the introduction of the RRSP framework in 1957 sought to address a tax inequity due to the ineligibility of private savings for tax-incentive in comparison with registered pension plans. From 1972 to 1991 the RRSP contribution limit was set at 20 percent of earned income and in 1991, the government reduced the contribution limit to 18 percent of earned income; further, over this time period the real value of the absolute dollar limit reduced significantly. Recent increases to the absolute dollar limits have been strongly welcomed. To ensure that contribution limits do not pose a barrier to saving for future retirement income needs, the CMA recommends that Finance Canada initiate a consultation on future increases to the RRSP contribution limit, both absolute and percent of earned income. As part of the 2010 Finance Canada consultation and as reiterated during the legislative and regulatory consultation period on the PRPP framework, the CMA highlighted its support for exploring measures to enable organizations to sponsor plans on behalf of the self-employed. During the PRPP consultation, the CMA recommended amending the legislation such that well-governed professional organizations representing a particular membership are able to sponsor and administer PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. Once again, the CMA supports an extension of this recommendation to the broader pension framework. Finally, the CMA has taken note of the concerns regarding the registered retirement income funds (RRIF) mandatory drawdown rates expressed in the C.D. Howe Institute's recent pension policy e-brief Outliving our savings: Registered retirement income funds rules need a big update. The CMA recommends that Finance Canada include RRIF mandatory drawdown rates as part of a consultation. The CMA appreciates the opportunity to provide comment as part of Finance Canada's consultation on enabling target benefit plans within the federally regulated pension framework. The CMA supports further consultation on Canada's pension plan with an aim to ensure optimization of the third pillar, tax-incentivized savings vehicles, to ensure it enables adequate savings levels by self-employed individuals for their future retirement income needs.
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Tamper Resistance under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11295
Date
2014-08-26
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2014-08-26
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide its response to the Tamper resistance under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act consultation, published in the Canada Gazette on June 28, 2014. The CMA encourages Health Canada to accelerate the development of regulations to require products containing specified controlled substances, or classes thereof, to have tamper-resistant properties in order to be sold in Canada. The CMA reiterates its overarching recommendation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health during its 2014 study on addressing prescription drug abuse1; that the federal government work with provincial/territorial governments and other stakeholders to develop and implement a comprehensive national strategy to address the misuse and abuse of prescription medication in Canada. The CMA recommends that such a strategy must include prevention, treatment, surveillance and research, as well as consumer protection. One form of consumer protection is the requirement of modifications to the drugs themselves with the intent of minimizing their abuse potential. The CMA also reiterates its recommendation made to Health Canada during the consultation on the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations in 20142, that Health Canada establish higher levels of regulatory scrutiny for controlled prescription medication, with more stringent pre-approval requirements. In that brief, the CMA recommends that prescription opioid medication or other potentially addictive medications have tamper- resistant formulations3 to reduce the potential for misuse or abuse. A similar position is taken by the National Advisory Council on Substance Misuse's strategy, First Do No Harm: Responding to Canada's Prescription Drug Crisis4, where one of the 58 recommendations made is that governments and other stakeholders "review existing evidence and/or conduct objective and independent research on the effectiveness of tamper-resistant and abuse-deterrent technology and packaging and make recommendations as needed to reduce the harms associated with prescription drugs and paediatric exposure." Tamper-resistant technology aims to reduce abuse readiness and reduce dependence potential of psychoactive medications, by reducing or impeding the achievement of a rapid euphoric effect ("high") from tampering of the formulation. This can be accomplished by altering physical or chemical properties or absorption rate, prolonging half-life, developing 1 Canadian Medical Association (2013) The need for a national strategy to address abuse and misuse of prescription drugs in Canada. CMA Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health. CMA. Retrieved from: https://www.cma.ca/Assets/assets- library/document/en/advocacy/Prescription-Drug- Abuse_en.pdf#search=The%20need%20for%20a%20national%20strategy%20to%20address%20abuse%20and%20misuse%20of%20prescription 2 Canadian Medical Association (2014) Review of Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. Submission to Health Canada in response to the consultation on the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations. CMA. Retrieved from: https://www.cma.ca/Assets/assets- library/document/en/advocacy/CMA_SubmissiontoHealthCanada- CDSA_Modernization.pdf#search=Submission%20to%20Health%20Canada%20in%20response%20to%20the%20consultation%20on%20the%20 Controlled%20Drugs%20and%20Substances%20Act%20and%20its%20regulations%2E 3 There are different terms to characterize efforts to prevent the manipulation of psychoactive medications for abuse purposes: abuse or tamper resistant formulations, abuse or tamper deterrent formulations and others. In the literature, and for the purpose of this submission, terms are sometimes used interchangeably. 4 National Advisory Committee on Prescription Drug Misuse (2013) First do no harm: Responding to Canada's prescription drug crisis. Ottawa: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (p30). Retrieved from: http://www.ccsa.ca/resource%20library/canada-strategy-prescription-drug-misuse- report-en.pdf prodrugs (inactive forms that are converted to active forms in the human body), or adding ingredients that are unattractive to users when the drug is altered. The science around tamper resistance is relatively recent, and analytical, clinical and other methods for developing and evaluating such technologies is increasing. The regulations will have to account for this new and evolving area of expertise, in maintaining scientific rigour in the assessment and evaluation of new formulations both in the pre-approval stage as well as in the post-approval monitoring, while still ensuring efficacy for their target indication.5 Pre-marketing evaluations assess the potentially tamper-resistant properties of a product under controlled circumstances. They should include laboratory-based, pharmacokinetic and clinical abuse potential studies. Post-approval monitoring seeks to determine whether the marketing of the potentially tamper-resistant formulation results in changes in patterns of use, addiction, overdoses and deaths. It is important to understand whether there have been successful attempts to defeat or compromise such formulations. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration has not approved explicit label claims of abuse deterrence and will wait until there is sufficient post-marketing data.6 7 Generic manufacturers would have to be held to the same standards. The availability of good quality, systematic surveillance data from Canadian populations is essential to demonstrate epidemiological trends, and would inform these regulations. Regulations must take into consideration the drugs that are most frequently diverted for abuse, the most frequent forms of abuse of each drug, those causing most overdoses and deaths and the populations that are most affected. As stated previously, it is essential that such regulations be part of a comprehensive strategy to reduce abuse of prescription medications. Studies have shown that if no other measures are taken, people who are dealing with addiction and dependence will simply shift to another prescription drug that is not tamper-resistant, or even to illegal drugs. Deterrence is specific to the drug in question. Such has been the case with the introduction of oxycodone with the tamper-resistant formulation, OxyNEO(r), with a significant reduction of oxycodone as a drug of choice. However, at the same time, there was a rise in the use of heroin and other opioids which did not have abuse deterrent technology8, 9. Tamper-resistant technologies have not been proven to be 100% effective in preventing abuse. They are not successful in preventing the most common form of abuse, which is the ingestion of a large number of intact pills, although there have been some attempts at the addition of aversive agents. There is, however, the potential for a significant reduction in the 5 Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (2013) Guidance for Industry: abuse-deterrent opioids - evaluation and labeling. Draft Guidance. Food and Drug Administration. US Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/UCM334743.pdf 6 Romach, MK, Schoedel, KA, & Sellers, EM (2013) Update on tamper-resistant drug formulations. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 130: 13-23. 7 Shaeffer, T (2012) Abuse-deterrent formulations, an evolving technology against the abuse and misuse of opioid analgesics. J.Med.Toxicol. 8:400-407. 8 Cicero, TJ, Ellis, MS, Surratt, HL (2012 Jul 12). Effect of abuse-deterrent formulation of OxyContin. N Engl J Med. 367(2): 187-9. 9 The Conference Board of Canada (2014) Innovations and policy solutions for addressing prescription drug abuse: summary report. Retrieved from: http://www.conferenceboard.ca/Libraries/CONF_PDFS_PUBLIC/14-0131_SummaryReport_June6.sflb progression from oral to other forms of use, such as chewing, snorting, smoking and injecting. There is an additional challenge, which is the fact that information about procedures and recipes for drug tampering is available among people who use drugs, and sometimes is found on the Internet. There is the possibility of negative unintended consequences in mandating tamper-resistant properties as a condition of sale for selected prescription drugs. There have been anecdotal reports that such forms might not be as effective in addressing the therapeutic needs of some patients. As well, some patients have had difficulties in swallowing tamper-resistant formulations of some drugs. It is essential that the regulations ensure that these medications have adequate clinical testing to ensure bioequivalence to the original formulations, without added adverse effects. The regulations must also take into account the affordability of the new formulations - that the development costs of the tamper-resistant technology not result in an excessive increase in the cost to patients. This must be closely monitored so that there are adequate options for pain management. Prescription drug abuse is a complex and very concerning health problem, and it will require more than a single policy solution. Safer drug formulations have the potential to be an important element of a comprehensive strategy, as medications are necessary tools for the treatment of pain. However, other components such as better surveillance and monitoring, clinical guidelines and tools, and enhanced access to withdrawal and addiction treatment services, as well as mental health and specialized pain services are also essential. The CMA is pleased to provide the recommendations listed below on the development and establishment of new regulations and encourages Health Canada to accelerate the advancement of the draft regulations. Recommendations The CMA recommends that: 1. Health Canada accelerate the establishment requirements for tamper-resistant formulations with the intent of minimizing their abuse potential, as part of a comprehensive national strategy to address the misuse and abuse of prescription medication in Canada, in collaboration with provincial/territorial governments and other stakeholders. 2. both brand name and generic manufacturers be held to the same standards regarding tamper-resistant formulations. 3. the regulations account for the new and evolving area of expertise in tamper-resistance formulations, in maintaining scientific rigour in the assessment and evaluation of new formulations in the pre-approval and post-marketing stages. 4. the regulations ensure that tamper-resistant formulations maintain the same levels of efficacy for their target therapeutic indication as the original formulations, without added adverse effects. 5. the regulations include requirements for post-approval monitoring to determine whether the marketing of the potentially tamper-resistant formulation results in changes in patterns of use, addiction, overdoses and deaths. 6. Health Canada strengthen surveillance systems to collect necessary data from Canadian populations to inform these regulations regarding epidemiological trends, including the drugs that are most frequently diverted for abuse, the most frequent forms of abuse of each drug, those causing most overdoses and deaths and the populations that are affected.
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