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Federal monitoring of medical assistance in dying regulations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13856
Date
2018-02-13
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2018-02-13
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide input on the proposed regulations of the federal monitoring of Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada. The CMA fully supports the proposed intent of the regulations, in particular, public accountability and transparency and safeguards for vulnerable patient populations. Tracking trends and carrying out research is very important to monitor the implementation and implications of medical assistance in dying. The CMA further supports the intent to provide electronic reporting and guidance documents, and to leverage any synergies between the federal and provincial/territorial governments, especially to prevent duplication and to promote consistency in reporting across the country. The CMA would like to raise the following critical areas for your consideration: 1. Definitions/parameters of terms There continues to be a need to more clearly define several terms to ensure consistency of reporting. For example: a. Who constitutes a “practitioner”? One can argue that there is a broad scope of who is “a medical practitioner or nurse practitioner”. Is it the practitioner who provides MAiD? Or he practitioner who first reads a patient’s request for MAiD? Or is the first practitioner? Or second practitioner who assesses the patient? b. What constitutes a therapeutic relationship (as one of the eight proposed items to be collected about the practitioner)? A therapeutic relationship is not required to access MAiD. This criterion should be removed and if not, given the differences in opinion in the health professions as to what constitutes a therapeutic relationship includes, it should be clearly defined. c. What constitutes a request, a written request, the receipt of a request? If reporting obligations are “triggered” by a patient’s “written request”, at what point is that request actually triggered? The very first practitioner who receives the patient’s written request? Or the practitioner who conducts the eligibility assessment upon receipt of the written request? Or the practitioner who provides the prescription or carries out the procedure? d. On a related point, without clear definitions, any future comparative analysis of research or trends will be difficult as there will be no common starting point. e. There continues to be confusion on how to count or when to start counting the required 10 clear days. There are many reasons why this requires more clarity. 2. Collection and protection of data We applaud Health Canada for further reducing and revising data requirements. We submit, however, that further reductions are required for several reasons, including adherence to privacy best practices that require the collection of the least amount of data necessary to achieve reasonable purposes. In particular: a. In view of the quantity and highly personal and sensitive data that will be collected about patients and practitioners, data sharing agreements should be required; for example, agreements between the federal government and provincial/territorial governments or between researchers and others requesting use of the data to facilitate the appropriate sharing of data. b. Collection of personal information should be limited to what is relevant to the purpose of monitoring medical assistance in dying. Personal information, such as the patient’s full postal code, marital status, or principal occupation is beyond the scope of the eligibility criteria outlined in the legislation and thus beyond the scope of the purpose of monitoring the impact of the legislation. c. Any “characteristics” of the patient should refer only to the eligibility criteria. If other data will be collected beyond that scope, the justification for doing so, and the characteristics themselves, should be clearly outlined. d. The scope of the information collected about the practitioner could be narrowed. As is, it is very broad – a list of eight items – while the Quebec regulations, as a comparator, have only three-four items that must be collected in relation to the physician who administers MAiD. 3. Additional requirements Schedule 4 [section 2(i)] of the proposed regulations requires that the practitioner opine as to whether the patient met, or did not meet, all of the eligibility criteria outlined in the legislation – with two significantly expanded requirements; the requirements that the practitioner: 1) provide an estimate as to the amount of time MAiD shortened the patient’s life; and 2) indicate the anticipated likely cause of natural death of the patient. These additional requirements are beyond the letter and spirit of the legislation and, in many ways, are in direct contradiction to the legislation. The Legislature was not unaware when it drafted the Act that it did not follow other jurisdictions’ criteria requiring either a terminal illness or a prognosis of time within which the practitioner believed the patient would die, e.g., “within the next 6 months”. It is specifically the lack of a timeframe that makes the legislation unique and provides flexibility for both patients and practitioners. By adding these two additional criteria for reporting, in effect, they become additional criteria for eligibility which is, as stated above, beyond the scope, and in contradiction to, the legislation. 4. Lack of clarity of reasons for ineligibility There is a potential for misunderstanding as to whether reasons are required when the patient does not meet the criteria under Schedule 4, section 2(a) – (h). The introduction to section 2 speaks to the practitioner giving an indication as to (a) whether the patient met or (b) did not meet the criteria. However, in the itemized criteria [2(a)-(h)] it only speaks to the practitioner having to provide reasons when the patient meets the criteria (and not when the patient has not met the criteria). It would be helpful to specify that reasons should be required when the patient does and does not meet the criteria. This is also crucial for the publication of the Minister of Health’s annual report requiring that the reasons, and which eligibility criteria were not met, be addressed. Conclusion The CMA recognizes the importance of regulations to capture the provision, collection, use, and disposal of information for the purpose of monitoring MAiD. The CMA cautions against introducing reporting requirements that are beyond the scope of the legislation. As noted in the legislation, practitioners who fail to provide information under the regulations may be found guilty under the Criminal Code and subject to possible imprisonment. It is thus imperative that the federal government drafts clear regulations that respect the legislation, privacy, research ethics, and a de minimus approach. .
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Best practices for smartphone and smart-device clinical photo taking and sharing

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13860
Date
2018-03-03
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Date
2018-03-03
Topics
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
Clinical photography is a valuable tool for physicians. Smartphones, as well as other devices supporting network connectivity, offer a convenient, efficient method to take and share images. However, due to the private nature of the information contained in clinical photographs there are concerns as to the appropriate storage, dissemination, and documentation of clinical images. Confidentiality of image data must be considered and the dissemination of these images onto servers must respect the privacy and rights of the patient. Importantly, patient information should be considered as any information deriving from a patient, and the concepts outlined therefore apply to any media that can be collected on, or transmitted with, a smart-device. Clinical photography can aid in documenting form and function, in tracking conditions and wound healing, in planning surgical operations, and in clinical decision-making. Additionally, clinical photographs can provide physicians with a valuable tool for patient communication and education. Due to the convenience of this type of technology it is not appropriate to expect physicians to forego their use in providing their patients with the best care available. The technology and software required for secure transfer, communication, and storage of clinical media is presently available, but many devices have non-secure storage/dissemination options enabled and lack user-control for permanently deleting digital files. In addition, data uploaded onto server systems commonly cross legal jurisdictions. Many physicians are not comfortable with the practice, citing security, privacy, and confidentiality concerns as well as uncertainty in regards to regional regulations governing this practice.1 Due to concern for patient privacy and confidentiality it is therefore incredibly important to limit the unsecure or undocumented acquisition or dissemination of clinical photographs. To assess the current state of this topic, Heyns et al. have reviewed the accessibility and completeness of provincial and territorial medical regulatory college guidelines.2 Categories identified as vital and explored in this review included: Consent; Storage; Retention; Audit; Transmission; and Breach. While each regulatory body has addressed limited aspects of the overall issue, the authors found a general lack of available information and call for a unified document outlining pertinent instructions for conducting clinical photography using a smartphone and the electronic transmission of patient information.2 The discussion of this topic will need to be ongoing and it is important that physicians are aware of applicable regulations, both at the federal and provincial levels, and how these regulations may impact the use of personal devices. The best practices supported here aim to provide physicians and healthcare providers with an understanding of the scope and gravity of the current environment, as well as the information needed to ensure patient privacy and confidentiality is assessed and protected while physicians utilize accessible clinical photography to advance patient care. Importantly, this document only focusses on medical use (clinical, academic, and educational) of clinical photography and, while discussing many core concepts of patient privacy and confidentiality of information, should not be perceived as a complete or binding framework. Additionally, it is recommended that physicians understand the core competencies of clinical photography, which are not described here. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) suggests that the following recommendations be implemented, as thoroughly as possible, to best align with the CMA policy on the Principles for the Protection of Patient Privacy (CMA Policy PD2018-02). These key recommendations represent a non-exhaustive set of best practices - physicians should seek additional information as needed to gain a thorough understanding and to stay current in this rapidly changing field. KEY RECOMMENDATIONS 1. CONSENT * Informed consent must be obtained, preferably prior, to photography with a mobile device. This applies for each and any such encounter and the purpose made clear (i.e. clinical, research, education, publication, etc.). Patients should also be made aware that they may request a copy of a picture or for a picture to be deleted. * A patient's consent to use electronic transmission does not relieve a physician of their duty to protect the confidentiality of patient information. Also, a patient's consent cannot override other jurisdictionally mandated security requirements. * All patient consents (including verbal) should be documented. The acquisition and recording of patient consent for medical photography/dissemination may be held to a high standard of accountability due to the patient privacy and confidentiality issues inherent in the use of this technology. Written and signed consent is encouraged. * Consent should be considered as necessary for any and all photography involving a patient, whether or not that patient can be directly recognized, due to the possibility of linked information and the potential for breach of privacy. The definition of non-identifiable photos must be carefully considered. Current technologies such as face recognition and pattern matching (e.g. skin markers, physical structure, etc.), especially in combination with identifying information, have the potential to create a privacy breach. * Unsecure text and email messaging requires explicit patient consent and should not be used unless the current gold standards of security are not accessible. For a patient-initiated unsecure transmission, consent should be clarified and not assumed. 2. TRANSMISSION * Transmission of photos and patient information should be encrypted as per current-day gold standards (presently, end-to-end encryption (E2EE)) and use only secure servers that are subject to Canadian laws. Explicit, informed consent is required otherwise due to privacy concerns or standards for servers in other jurisdictions. Generally, free internet-based communication services and public internet access are unsecure technologies and often operate on servers outside of Canadian jurisdiction. * Efforts should be made to use the most secure transmission method possible. For data security purposes, identifying information should never be included in the image, any frame of a video, the file name, or linked messages. * The sender should always ensure that each recipient is intended and appropriate and, if possible, receipt of transmission should be confirmed by the recipient. 3. STORAGE * Storing images and data on a smart-device should be limited as much as possible for data protection purposes. * Clinical photos, as well as messages or other patient-related information, should be completely segregated from the device's personal storage. This can be accomplished by using an app that creates a secure, password-protected folder on the device. * All information stored (on internal memory or cloud) must be strongly encrypted and password protected. The security measures must be more substantial than the general password unlock feature on mobile devices. * Efforts should be made to dissociate identifying information from images when images are exported from a secure server. Media should not be uploaded to platforms without an option for securely deleting information without consent from the patient, and only if there are no better options. Automatic back-up of photos to unsecure cloud servers should be deactivated. Further, other back-up or syncing options that could lead to unsecure server involvement should be ascertained and the risks mitigated. 4. Cloud storage should be on a Canadian and SOCII certified server. Explicit, informed consent is required otherwise due to privacy concerns for servers in other jurisdictions. 5. AUDIT & RETENTION * It is important to create an audit trail for the purposes of transparency and medical best practice. Key information includes patient and health information, consent type and details, pertinent information regarding the photography (date, circumstance, photographer), and any other important facts such as access granted/deletion requests. * Access to the stored information must be by the authorized physician or health care provider and for the intended purpose, as per the consent given. Records should be stored such that it is possible to print/transfer as necessary. * Original photos should be retained and not overwritten. * All photos and associated messages may be considered part of the patient's clinical records and should be maintained for at least 10 years or 10 years after the age of majority, whichever is longer. When possible, patient information (including photos and message histories between health professionals) should be retained and amalgamated with a patient's medical record. Provincial regulations regarding retention of clinical records may vary and other regulations may apply to other entities - e.g. 90 years from date of birth applies to records at the federal level. * It may not be allowable to erase a picture if it is integral to a clinical decision or provincial, federal, or other applicable regulations require their retention. 6. BREACH * Any breach should be taken seriously and should be reviewed. All reasonable efforts must be made to prevent a breach before one occurs. A breach occurs when personal information, communication, or photos of patients are stolen, lost, or mistakenly disclosed. This includes loss or theft of one's mobile device, texting to the wrong number or emailing/messaging to the wrong person(s), or accidentally showing a clinical photo that exists in the phone's personal photo album. * It should be noted that non-identifying information, when combined with other available information (e.g. a text message with identifiers or another image with identifiers), can lead to highly accurate re-identification. * At present, apps downloaded to a smart-device for personal use may be capable of collecting and sharing information - the rapidly changing nature of this technology and the inherent privacy concerns requires regular attention. Use of specialized apps designed for health-information sharing that help safeguard patient information in this context is worth careful consideration. * Having remote wipe (i.e. device reformatting) capabilities is an asset and can help contain a breach. However, inappropriate access may take place before reformatting occurs. * If a smartphone is strongly encrypted and has no clinical photos stored locally then its loss may not be considered a breach. * In the event of a breach any patient potentially involved must be notified as soon as possible. The CMPA, the organization/hospital, and the Provincial licensing College should also be contacted immediately. Provincial regulations regarding notification of breach may vary. Approved by the CMA Board of Directors March 2018 References i Heyns M†, Steve A‡, Dumestre DO‡, Fraulin FO‡, Yeung JK‡ † University of Calgary, Canada ‡ Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Canada 1 Chan N, Charette J, Dumestre DO, Fraulin FO. Should 'smart phones' be used for patient photography? Plast Surg (Oakv). 2016;24(1):32-4. 2 Unpublished - Heyns M, Steve A, Dumestre DO, Fraulin FO, Yeung J. Canadian Guidelines on Smartphone Clinical Photography.
Documents
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Health Care Coverage for Migrants: An Open Letter to the Canadian Federal Government

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13940
Date
2018-12-15
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Date
2018-12-15
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
Dear Prime Minister Trudeau & Ministers Taylor and Hussen, We are writing to you today as members of the health community to urge your action on a crucial matter pertaining to health and human rights. You will no doubt be aware that the United Nations Human Rights Committee (UNHRC) recently issued a landmark decision condemning Canada for denying access to essential health care on the basis of immigration status based on the case of Nell Toussaint. Nell is a 49-year-old woman from Grenada who has been living in Canada since 1999, and who suffered significant negative health consequences as a result of being denied access to essential health care services. The UNHRC’s decision condemns Canada’s existing discriminatory policies, and finds Canada to be in violation of both the right to life, as well as the right to equality and freedom from discrimination. Based on its review of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the UNHRC has declared that Canada must provide Nell with adequate compensation for the significant harm she suffered. As well, they have called on Canada to report on its review of national legislation within a 180-day period, in order “to ensure that irregular migrants have access to essential health care to prevent a reasonably foreseeable risk that can result in loss of life”. The United Nations Special Rapporteur has pushed for the same, calling on the government “to protect health-related rights to life, security of the person, and equality of individuals and groups in situations of vulnerability”. Nell is one of an estimated half million people in Ontario alone who are denied access to health coverage and care on the basis of their immigration status, putting their health at risk. As members of Canada’s health community, we are appalled by the details of this case as well as its broad implications, and call on the government to: 1. Comply with the UNHRC’s order to review existing laws and policies regarding health care coverage for irregular migrants. 2. Ensure appropriate resource allocation, so that all people in Canada are provided universal and equitable access to health care services, regardless of immigration status. 3. Provide Nell Toussaint with adequate compensation for the significant harm she has suffered as a result of not receiving essential health care services. For more information on this issue, please see our backgrounder here: https://goo.gl/V9vPyo. Sincerely, Arnav Agarwal, MD, Internal Medicine Resident, University of Toronto, Toronto ON Nisha Kansal, BHSc, MD Candidate, McMaster University, Hamilton ON Michaela Beder, MD, Psychiatrist, Toronto ON Ritika Goel, MD, Family Physician, Toronto ON This open letter is signed by the following organizations and individuals: Bathurst United Church TOPS 1. Arnav Agarwal, MD, Internal Medicine Resident, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 2. Nisha Kansal, BHSc, MD Candidate, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 3. Michaela Beder, MD FRCPC, Psychiatrist, Toronto ON 4. Ritika Goel, MD, Family Physician, Toronto ON 5. Gordon Guyatt, MD FRCPC, Internal Medicine Specialist, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 6. Melanie Spence, RN, Nursing, South Riverdale Community Health Centre, Toronto ON 7. Yipeng Ge, BHSc, Medical Student, University of Ottawa, Ottawa ON 8. Stephen Hwang, MD, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 9. Gigi Osler, BScMed, MD, FRCSC, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa ON 10. Anjum Sultana, MPH, Public Policy Professional, Toronto ON 11. Danyaal Raza, MD, MPH, CCFP, Family Medicine, Toronto ON 12. P.J. Devereaux, MD, PhD, Cardiologist, McMaster University, Brantford ON 13. Mathura Karunanithy, MA, Public Policy Researcher, Toronto ON 14. Philip Berger, MD, Family Physician, Toronto ON 15. Nanky Rai, MD MPH, Primary Care Physician, Toronto ON 16. Michaela Hynie, Prof, Researcher, York University, Toronto ON 17. Meb Rashid, MD CCFP FCFP, Family Physician, Toronto ON 18. Sally Lin, MPH, Public Health, Victoria BC 19. Jonathon Herriot, BSc, MD, CCFP, Family Physician, Toronto ON 20. Carolina Jimenez, RN, MPH, Nurse, Toronto ON 21. Rushil Chaudhary, BHSc, Medical Student, Toronto ON 22. Nisha Toomey, MA (Ed), PhD Student, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 23. Matei Stoian, BSc, BA, Medical Student, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 24. Ruth Chiu, MD, Family Medicine Resident, Kingston ON 25. Priya Gupta, Medical Student, Hamilton ON 26. The Neighbourhood Organization (TNO), Toronto, ON 27. Mohammad Asadi-Lari, MD/PhD Candidate, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 28. Kathleen Hughes, MD Candidate, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 29. Nancy Vu, MPA, Medical Student, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 30. Ananthavalli Kumarappah, MD, Family Medicine Resident, University of Calgary, Calgary AB 31. Renee Sharma, MSc, Medical Student, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 32. Daniel Voloshin, Medical Student , McMaster Medical School , Hamilton ON 33. Sureka Pavalagantharajah, Medical Student, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 34. Alice Cavanagh , MD/PhD Student, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 35. Krish Bilimoria, MD(c), Medical Student, University of Toronto, North York ON 36. Bilal Bagha, HBSc, Medical Student, St. Catharines ON 37. Rana Kamhawy, Medical Student, Hamilton ON 38. Annie Yu, Medical Student, Toronto ON 39. Samantha Rossi, MA, Medical Student, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 40. Carlos Chan, MD Candidate, Medical Student, McMaster University, St Catharines ON 41. Jacqueline Vincent, MA, Medical Student, McMaster, Kitchener ON 42. Eliza Pope, BHSc, Medical Student, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 43. Cara Elliott, MD, Medical Student, Toronto ON 44. Antu Hossain, MPH, Public Health Professional, East York ON 45. Lyubov Lytvyn, MSc, PhD Student in Health Research, McMaster University, Burlington ON 46. Michelle Cohen, MD, CCFP, Family Physician, Brighton ON 47. Serena Arora, Medical Student, Hamilton ON 48. Saadia Sediqzadah, MD, Psychiatrist, Toronto ON 49. Maxwell Tran, Medical Student, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 50. Asia van Buuren, BSc, Medical Student, Toronto ON 51. Darby Little, Medical Student, University of Toronto, Toronto ON 52. Ximena Avila Monroy, MD MSc, Psychiatry Resident, Sherbrooke QC 53. Abeer Majeed, MD, CCFP, Family Physician, Toronto ON 54. Oluwatobi Olaiya, RN, Medical Student, Hamilton ON 55. Ashley Warnock, MSc, HBSc, HBA, Medical Student, McMaster University, Hamilton ON 56. Nikhita Singhal, Medical Student, Hamilton ON 57. Nikki Shah, MD Candidate, Medical Student, Hamilton ON 58. Karishma Ramjee, MD Family Medicine Resident , Scarborough ON 59. Yan Zhang, MSc, Global Health Professional, Toronto ON 60. Megan Saunders, MD, Family Physician, Toronto ON 61. Pooja Gandhi, MSc, Speech Pathologist, Mississauga ON 62. Julianna Deutscher, MD, Resident, Toronto ON 63. Diana Da Silva, MSW, Social Worker, Toronto ON Health Care Coverage for Migrants: An Open Letter to the Canadian Federal Government Sign here - https://goo.gl/forms/wAXTJE6YiqUFSo8x1 The Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada The Honourable Ginette P. Taylor, Minister of Health The Honourable Ahmed D. Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship CC: Mr. Dainius Puras, United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health Dear Prime Minister Trudeau & Ministers Taylor and Hussen, We are writing to you today as members of the health community to urge your action on a crucial matter pertaining to health and human rights. You will no doubt be aware that the United Nations Human Rights Committee (UNHRC) recently issued a landmark decision condemning Canada for denying access to essential health care on the basis of immigration status based on the case of Nell Toussaint. Nell is a 49-year-old woman from Grenada who has been living in Canada since 1999, and who suffered significant negative health consequences as a result of being denied access to essential health care services. The UNHRC’s decision condemns Canada’s existing discriminatory policies, and finds Canada to be in violation of both the right to life, as well as the right to equality and freedom from discrimination. Based on its review of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the UNHRC has declared that Canada must provide Nell with adequate compensation for the significant harm she suffered. As well, they have called on Canada to report on its review of national legislation within a 180-day period, in order “to ensure that irregular migrants have access to essential health care to prevent a reasonably foreseeable risk that can result in loss of life”. The United Nations Special Rapporteur has pushed for the same, calling on the government “to protect health-related rights to life, security of the person, and equality of individuals and groups in situations of vulnerability”. Nell is one of an estimated half million people in Ontario alone who are denied access to health coverage and care on the basis of their immigration status, putting their health at risk. As members of Canada’s health community, we are appalled by the details of this case as well as its broad implications, and call on the government to: 1. Comply with the UNHRC’s order to review existing laws and policies regarding health care coverage for irregular migrants. 2. Ensure appropriate resource allocation, so that all people in Canada are provided universal and equitable access to health care services, regardless of immigration status. 3. Provide Nell Toussaint with adequate compensation for the significant harm she has suffered as a result of not receiving essential health care services. For more information on this issue, please see our backgrounder here: https://goo.gl/V9vPyo. Sincerely, Arnav Agarwal, MD, Internal Medicine Resident, University of Toronto, Toronto ON Nisha Kansal, BHSc, MD Candidate, McMaster University, Hamilton ON Michaela Beder, MD, Psychiatrist, Toronto ON Ritika Goel, MD, Family Physician, Toronto ON
Documents
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CMA Policy Endorsement Guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14021
Date
2018-03-03
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Date
2018-03-03
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Text
These Guidelines constitute an implementation tool of seven recommendations and are informed by Guidelines for CMA’s Activities and Relationships with Other Parties (aka CMA’s Corporate Relationships Policy) and CMA’s Advertising and Sponsorship Policy. 1. Scope These Guidelines apply to the Canadian Medical Association (and not to its subsidiaries). As these are Guidelines, exceptions may be necessary from time to time wherein staff may use their discretion and judgment. 2. Definition Endorsement is an umbrella term encompassing “policy endorsement”, “sponsorship1” and “branding”. Policy endorsement includes: (a) CMA considering upon request, non-pecuniary public approval, which may include the use of CMA’s name and/or logo, of an organization’s written policy, on an issue that aligns with CMA policy, where there is no immediate expectation of return; or, (b) CMA adopting the policy of another organization as our policy; or (c) CMA asking another organization to publicly support our policy. 3. Process (a) Criteria: For policy endorsement requests from another organization to endorse their policy2 the following criteria shall be applied: i) we have a policy on the subject-matter and ii) we are actively working on advancing that policy position and iii) the organization has a follow-up action plan associated with its request. (b) Approval: Where policy exists, approval requires a policy staff member (with portfolio responsibility) and the VP of Medical Professionalism, or the policy staff member (with portfolio responsibility) and the Chief Policy Advisor. Where no policy exists, approval of the Board of Directors is required. (c) Annual confirmation: Where CMA adopts the policy of another organization3, CMA staff shall confirm annually, or more frequently if circumstances dictate, that the policy has not been altered by the other organization. (d) Requests: Pursuit of personal endorsement requests are not appropriate. Wherever possible, requests should come from an organization and not an individual. 4. Results (a) Where CMA adopts the policy of another organization, the adopted policy shall become CMA policy, and will include a notation on the document as being an adopted policy of [organization]. (b) All adopted policies will be housed in an accessible searchable database. (c) All requests by organizations for CMA to endorse their policy will be tracked in a central location, along with any response. 1 Sponsorship means, to consider upon request, pecuniary public approval, which may include the use of CMA’s name and/or logo, of an organization’s event (eg., conference), on an issue that is supported by CMA policy or that promotes CMA brand awareness, where there is an immediate expectation of return. 2 That is, part (a) of the definition in Section 2. 3 That is, part (b) of the definition in Section 2.
Documents
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Wait time protocols and benchmarks

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1491
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-11
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure that practising physicians are involved in the development of wait time protocols and benchmarks that are based on the available evidence, that are administratively straightforward and that are satisfactory to the needs of patients and physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-11
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure that practising physicians are involved in the development of wait time protocols and benchmarks that are based on the available evidence, that are administratively straightforward and that are satisfactory to the needs of patients and physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will ensure that practising physicians are involved in the development of wait time protocols and benchmarks that are based on the available evidence, that are administratively straightforward and that are satisfactory to the needs of patients and physicians.
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Family physicians and hospital affiliation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1502
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-36
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-36
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
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Payment for discussions of patient health with other health professionals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1508
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-44
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-44
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
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Physician health and well-being

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1512
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the educational needs of physician leaders with respect to physician health and well-being through the creation of professional development opportunities and programs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-48
The Canadian Medical Association supports the educational needs of physician leaders with respect to physician health and well-being through the creation of professional development opportunities and programs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the educational needs of physician leaders with respect to physician health and well-being through the creation of professional development opportunities and programs.
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Compensation ceilings for GP's and access to front-line services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1524
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-51
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that compensation ceilings for general practitioners where they exist be removed in order to improve access to front-line services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-51
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that compensation ceilings for general practitioners where they exist be removed in order to improve access to front-line services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that compensation ceilings for general practitioners where they exist be removed in order to improve access to front-line services.
Less detail

Promotion of physical activity among physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1525
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC04-52
The Canadian Medical Association, in keeping with its vision of a healthy population and national advocacy mission, shall vigorously promote physical activity among physicians for the sake of their own wellness, which in turn enhances their ability to care for others and sets an important example in encouraging patients to be physically active.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC04-52
The Canadian Medical Association, in keeping with its vision of a healthy population and national advocacy mission, shall vigorously promote physical activity among physicians for the sake of their own wellness, which in turn enhances their ability to care for others and sets an important example in encouraging patients to be physically active.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in keeping with its vision of a healthy population and national advocacy mission, shall vigorously promote physical activity among physicians for the sake of their own wellness, which in turn enhances their ability to care for others and sets an important example in encouraging patients to be physically active.
Less detail

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