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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


36 records – page 1 of 4.

Canadian Medical Association Submission on Bill S-209, An Act to Amend the Criminal Code (prize fights)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10708
Date
2013-04-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2013-04-15
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
In 2010, physician delegates to the CMA's annual General Council voted in favour of a ban on mixed martial arts prize fighting matches in Canada. The CMA's complete policy on head injury and sport, the central concern of physicians with respect to mixed martial arts, is attached as an appendix to this brief. A key recommendation in this policy is that physicians discourage participation in sports in which intentional trauma to the head and body is the objective of the sport, as is the case with mixed martial arts (MMA). Background MMA prize fighting, like commercial boxing, is distinct from healthy sport because the basic tenet is to win by deliberately incapacitating one's opponent through violent bodily assault. Professional fighters train in different martial arts disciplines in order to develop the widest possible set of fighting techniques. Blows delivered by hands, feet, elbows and knees are entirely permissible.1 "Bouts" are won in a number of ways that include deliberate head injury such as knockout (KO) and technical knockout (TKO). Physician and referee stoppage are recognized as a necessary option for the declaration of a winner in order to prevent continued violence.4; 5 Despite the introduction of rules and regulations meant to ensure fighter safety, MMA is a violent sport with a high risk of injury. Publications seem to indicate that the overall injury rate in professional MMA competitions ranges approximately from 23 to 28 injuries per 100 fight participations, which is similar to that found in other combat sports involving striking, including boxing.1; 5; 7 Organizers support the rules because they realize that prize fighting can't be sustained as a business if the fighters are unable to return to the ring. The injuries vary in severity but include many types of head injury: ocular injuries, such as rupture of the bony orbit or of the eye itself; facial injuries including fractures; spine injuries; concussion; and tympanic membrane ruptures.2, 6, 7 Most sanctioned matches end in a submission, judge's decision or referee/physician stoppage, as opposed to KO or TKO. It is important to note that the overall risk of critical injury, defined as a persistent acquired brain injury, permanent blindness, permanent functional loss of limb or paralysis, appears to be low. The ability of referees to intercede and for fighters to voluntarily concede victory to their opponents, as well as the presence of physicians at the ringside, are all thought to play a role in minimizing the risk of critical injury.7 The risk of traumatic brain injury and concussion nevertheless remains one of the chief concerns with respect to MMA. KO rates are thought to be lower in professional MMA events than in similar boxing competitions, but it is not clear why. It is well known that knockouts are the result of brain injury4 and at least one study reported that blunt trauma to the head was a common reason for match stoppage. One study reported a severe concussion rate of 16.5 per 100 fighter participations (3.3% of all matches). 6 Regrettably, as in other combat sports, long-term follow-up of players is insufficient to measure how often head injury leads to permanent brain damage.1, 3 Issues Insufficient research Whether you defend or condemn MMA, the true nature and rate of severe brain injuries is speculative.6 Similarly, the absence of longitudinal studies means that the true long-term health implications of MMA fighting can only be surmised. Risk factors for injury Unsurprisingly, losing fighters are at a considerably greater risk for sustaining injury. It is notable that fighters losing by KO or TKO appear to have a higher overall incidence of injury.4 An increased duration of fighting is associated with an increased incidence of injury.3, 5 However, it remains unclear how age and fight experience contribute to the risk for sustaining injury.2, 3, 4 It appears that fighters with head injury continue to fight and sustain further injury, head injury being more clearly associated with injury than are either inexperience or age. Current situation Despite the sport's growing popularity, professional MMA competitions are currently illegal in Canada. Indeed, section 83(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada states that only boxing matches, where only fists are used, are legal. However, the governments of Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and Northwest Territories have regulated/licensed MMA through athletic governing commissions, effectively circumventing the Criminal Code. The legality of the sport in New Brunswick, Alberta and British Columbia currently varies by municipality. CMA Recommendations The CMA recommends that Section 83(2) of the Criminal Code, the ban on mixed martial arts, be maintained in its current form. The CMA recommends that the federal government undertake further research on head injuries and concussion in Canada, including expanding current surveillance tools for the incidence of these injuries. References 1. Bledsoe, G. H. (2009). Mixed martial arts. In R. Kordi, N. Maffulli, R. R. Wroble, & W. A. Angus (Eds.), Combat Sports Medicine (1st ed., pp. 323-330). London: Springer. 2. Buse, G. J. (2006). No holds barred sport fighting: A 10 year review of mixed martial arts competition. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 40(2),169-172. 3. Bledsoe, G. H., Hsu, E. B., Grabowski, J. G., Brill, J. D., & Li, G. (2006). Incidence of injury in professional mixed martial arts competitions. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 5(Combat Sports Special Issue), 136-142. 4. Walrod, B. (2011). Current review of injuries sustained in mixed martial arts competition. Current Sports Medicine Reports, 10(5), 288-289. 5. Unified Fighting Championship. (n.d.). Unified rules and other important regulations of mixed martial arts. Retrieved May 28, 2012, from http://www.ufc.com/discover/sport/rules-and-regulations 6. Ngai, K. M., Levy, F., & Hsu, E. B. (2008). Injury trends in sanctioned mixed martial arts competition: A 5-year review from 2002 to 2007. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(8), 686-689. 7. Scoggin III, J. F., Brusovanik, G., Pi, M., Izuka, B., Pang, P., Tokomura, S. et al. (2010). Assessment of injuries sustained in mixed martial arts competition. American Journal of Orthopedics, 39(5), 247-251.
Documents
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Exposure to bisphenol A

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10870
Date
2013-08-21
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC13-61
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for legislation to protect Canadians from continued exposure to bisphenol A.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2013-08-21
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC13-61
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for legislation to protect Canadians from continued exposure to bisphenol A.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for legislation to protect Canadians from continued exposure to bisphenol A.
Less detail

Campaigns to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10915
Date
2013-08-21
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC13-98
The Canadian Medical Association supports campaigns to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Aboriginal communities in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2013-08-21
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC13-98
The Canadian Medical Association supports campaigns to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Aboriginal communities in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports campaigns to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Aboriginal communities in Canada.
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Continuum of care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8844
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-14
The Canadian Medical Association believes that the issue of the continuum of care must go beyond the question of financing and tackle questions related to the organisation of medicine and to the shared and joint responsibilities of individuals, communities and governments in matters of health care and promotion, prevention and rehabilitation.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-14
The Canadian Medical Association believes that the issue of the continuum of care must go beyond the question of financing and tackle questions related to the organisation of medicine and to the shared and joint responsibilities of individuals, communities and governments in matters of health care and promotion, prevention and rehabilitation.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association believes that the issue of the continuum of care must go beyond the question of financing and tackle questions related to the organisation of medicine and to the shared and joint responsibilities of individuals, communities and governments in matters of health care and promotion, prevention and rehabilitation.
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Informal caregivers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8846
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-16
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that governments undertake pilot studies to support informal caregivers and long-term care patients, including those that: a. explore tax credits and/or direct compensation to compensate informal caregivers for their work; b. expand relief programs for informal caregivers that provide guaranteed access to respite services in emergency situations; c. expand income and asset testing for residents requiring assisted living and long-term care; and d. promote information on advanced directives and representation agreements for patients.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-16
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that governments undertake pilot studies to support informal caregivers and long-term care patients, including those that: a. explore tax credits and/or direct compensation to compensate informal caregivers for their work; b. expand relief programs for informal caregivers that provide guaranteed access to respite services in emergency situations; c. expand income and asset testing for residents requiring assisted living and long-term care; and d. promote information on advanced directives and representation agreements for patients.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that governments undertake pilot studies to support informal caregivers and long-term care patients, including those that: a. explore tax credits and/or direct compensation to compensate informal caregivers for their work; b. expand relief programs for informal caregivers that provide guaranteed access to respite services in emergency situations; c. expand income and asset testing for residents requiring assisted living and long-term care; and d. promote information on advanced directives and representation agreements for patients.
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Long-term health care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8853
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-23
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to review variability in models of delivery of community and institutionally based long-term care across the provinces and territories as well as the standards against which they are regulated and accredited.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-23
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to review variability in models of delivery of community and institutionally based long-term care across the provinces and territories as well as the standards against which they are regulated and accredited.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to review variability in models of delivery of community and institutionally based long-term care across the provinces and territories as well as the standards against which they are regulated and accredited.
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Independent prescribing authority

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8862
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC07-33
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that pharmacists not be given independent prescribing authority.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC07-33
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that pharmacists not be given independent prescribing authority.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that pharmacists not be given independent prescribing authority.
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The right to prescribe medications

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8864
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC07-36
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that the right to prescribe medications independently for medical conditions must be reserved for qualified practitioners who are adequately trained to take a medical history, perform a physical examination, order and interpret appropriate investigations, and arrive at a working diagnosis.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC07-36
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that the right to prescribe medications independently for medical conditions must be reserved for qualified practitioners who are adequately trained to take a medical history, perform a physical examination, order and interpret appropriate investigations, and arrive at a working diagnosis.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates recommend that the right to prescribe medications independently for medical conditions must be reserved for qualified practitioners who are adequately trained to take a medical history, perform a physical examination, order and interpret appropriate investigations, and arrive at a working diagnosis.
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Access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8877
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-66
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-66
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
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Integrated water stewardship

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8885
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-67
The Canadian Medical Association calls on all levels of government to adopt an integrated water stewardship approach to ensure that all Canadians have access to adequate supplies of clean, safe and reliable drinking water.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-67
The Canadian Medical Association calls on all levels of government to adopt an integrated water stewardship approach to ensure that all Canadians have access to adequate supplies of clean, safe and reliable drinking water.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on all levels of government to adopt an integrated water stewardship approach to ensure that all Canadians have access to adequate supplies of clean, safe and reliable drinking water.
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36 records – page 1 of 4.