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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


18 records – page 1 of 2.

Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
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Adverse events

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9574
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-88
The Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing the importance of disclosing adverse events to affected patients in a timely manner, recommends that regional health authorities, institutions and professional associations develop policies to ensure the confidentiality of medical quality assurance deliberation, unless public notification is required to mitigate any possibility of ongoing harm.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-88
The Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing the importance of disclosing adverse events to affected patients in a timely manner, recommends that regional health authorities, institutions and professional associations develop policies to ensure the confidentiality of medical quality assurance deliberation, unless public notification is required to mitigate any possibility of ongoing harm.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing the importance of disclosing adverse events to affected patients in a timely manner, recommends that regional health authorities, institutions and professional associations develop policies to ensure the confidentiality of medical quality assurance deliberation, unless public notification is required to mitigate any possibility of ongoing harm.
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Combined fertilizer / pesticides

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1514
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC04-50
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to rescind the registration of combined fertilizer/pesticides.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC04-50
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to rescind the registration of combined fertilizer/pesticides.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to rescind the registration of combined fertilizer/pesticides.
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Electronic health records

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9543
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health information and e-health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-47
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to demand that governments recognize that the flow of information from the patient record to the electronic health records is the professional responsibility of physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health information and e-health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-47
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to demand that governments recognize that the flow of information from the patient record to the electronic health records is the professional responsibility of physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to demand that governments recognize that the flow of information from the patient record to the electronic health records is the professional responsibility of physicians.
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Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (Update 2009)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9489
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2009-05-31
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2009-05-31
Replaces
Fetal alcohol syndrome (Update 2000)
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER (UPDATE 2009) Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of environment-related birth defects and developmental disabilities in North America. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) believes that the prudent choice for women who are or may become pregnant is to abstain from alcohol, and encourages their partners to support them in this endeavour. The CMA urges Canadian governments to enact legislation that requires alcoholic beverages sold in Canada to be labelled with warnings of the hazards of consuming alcohol during pregnancy. The CMA also calls upon the federal government to examine the role that advertising plays in promoting the consumption of alcoholic beverages and to review existing policies and regulations in this area. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term used to describe the range of disabilities and diagnoses that result from drinking alcohol during pregnancy. It is estimated that more than 3,000 babies in Canada are born with FASD every year. Those who live with FASD may have mild to very severe problems with their health. They may have delays in their development, intellectual problems and problems in their social lives. Examples of these include: * skeletal abnormalities such as facial deformities * physical disabilities such as kidney and internal organ problems * depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder * difficulty understanding the consequences of their actions These disabilities are lifelong and those affected may need lifelong support. The drinking patterns of teenagers and the potential for women of reproductive age to consume alcohol mean that the health care system must actively address the prevention of FASD. Also, alcohol use may play a considerable role in unplanned pregnancy and inadequate prenatal and postnatal care. The CMA strongly supports all activities that encourage Canadians to moderate their alcohol consumption. The association encourages the public to be aware of the issues related to alcohol consumption, particularly the adverse effects on the fetus. In a continued effort to support the reduction of alcohol consumption, the CMA urges Canadian governments to enact legislation that requires alcoholic beverages sold in Canada to be labelled with warnings of the hazards of alcohol consumption during pregnancy.1 Appropriate agencies should also adopt regulations and/or policies to ensure that warnings about the adverse interaction between alcohol and both prescription and non-prescription products are prominently displayed or distributed wherever alcohol and drugs are sold or dispensed.2 The CMA also calls upon the federal government to examine the role that advertising plays in promoting the consumption of alcoholic beverages and to review existing policies and regulations in this area. The adverse effects of alcohol consumption by pregnant women are preventable. The CMA believes that the prudent choice for women who are or may become pregnant is to abstain from alcohol and encourages their partners to support them in this endeavour. Physicians should use appropriate screening methods to identify alcohol use in their patients. Physicians can play a leading role in educating and counselling women, spouses and family members about the dangers of alcohol to the fetus. The CMA also recommends that alcohol and drug addiction treatment services give high priority to the needs of pregnant women seeking help. 1 General Council resolution 89-67: That the Canadian Medical Association urge Governments in Canada to enact legislation requiring that all alcoholic beverages sold in Canada be labelled with warnings on the hazard from the consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Note: this motion was rescinded because it was superseded by the Policy on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (2000). 2 General Council resolution 87-31
Documents
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Front-line care providers in epidemics

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9571
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC09-85
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates urge governments to ensure that front-line care providers in practice and training are provided with adequate information, resources (including ventilators, masks, gloves, medications and vaccines) and personal and family disability and life insurance if performing clinical duties in the context of an epidemic or other public health emergency.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC09-85
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates urge governments to ensure that front-line care providers in practice and training are provided with adequate information, resources (including ventilators, masks, gloves, medications and vaccines) and personal and family disability and life insurance if performing clinical duties in the context of an epidemic or other public health emergency.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates urge governments to ensure that front-line care providers in practice and training are provided with adequate information, resources (including ventilators, masks, gloves, medications and vaccines) and personal and family disability and life insurance if performing clinical duties in the context of an epidemic or other public health emergency.
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Household antibacterial products

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9565
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-90
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon the federal government to ban the sale of household antibacterial products due to the risk of bacterial resistance and to recognize that soap and alcohol-based solutions are as effective in preventing household infection.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-90
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon the federal government to ban the sale of household antibacterial products due to the risk of bacterial resistance and to recognize that soap and alcohol-based solutions are as effective in preventing household infection.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon the federal government to ban the sale of household antibacterial products due to the risk of bacterial resistance and to recognize that soap and alcohol-based solutions are as effective in preventing household infection.
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Involving patients in the health care system transformation process

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9549
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-57
The Canadian Medical Association believes that it is essential to involve patients in the health care system transformation process and will adjust its communication strategies accordingly.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-57
The Canadian Medical Association believes that it is essential to involve patients in the health care system transformation process and will adjust its communication strategies accordingly.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association believes that it is essential to involve patients in the health care system transformation process and will adjust its communication strategies accordingly.
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Obesity and cardiovascular disease (Update 2004): (Applicable to Canadians aged 20-60 years)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1246
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2004-05-31
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2004-05-31
Replaces
Obesity and cardiovascular disease (2003): (Applicable to Canadians aged 20-60 years)
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease (Update 2004) (Applicable to Canadians aged 20-60 years) Official Position: Obesity is a chronic condition that is multi-factorial in origin, complex to treat, and is a major contributor to heart disease, type II diabetes, hypertension, stroke and some cancers. Due to the magnitude of the impact that obesity has on heart disease and stroke, and to the clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are often found in the obese patient, obesity is recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The impact of obesity points to the importance of prevention through healthy behaviours including increased physical activity and a healthy nutritional diet beginning early in life, and continuing through all stages of life. Solutions require comprehensive approaches that are both education and environment based, and that target and assist individuals, the family, and communities to engage in healthy lifestyle patterns and behaviours. Solutions also require ongoing research to develop and evaluate comprehensive approaches to obesity prevention, management and treatment, and surveillance data that measures and tracks obesity and its impact in Canada. Obesity Defined The World Health Organization defines obesity as a condition of excessive body fat accumulation to an extent that health may be compromised. Measuring Obesity Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely accepted parameter used to distinguish between obese and non-obese adults aged 20 to 60 years and thus provides information about the subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease. BMI is calculated by dividing the weight (in kilograms) by the square of the height (in metres). BMI = weight (in kilograms) height (in metres) * height (in metres) A BMI equal to or greater than 30 kg/m2 is classified as obese, while a BMI in the range of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 is classified as overweight. Waist circumference (WC) provides an independent prediction of health risks over and above BMI. Increased waist (abdominal) circumference is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, type II diabetes and hypertension. As waist circumference increases above 102 cm for men and 88 cm for women, the risks of health-related illnesses increase. Populations at Increased Risk Obese individuals with diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemias or who are physically inactive are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to individuals without these conditions. A BMI between 25 and 29.9 kg/m2 (overweight) is associated with elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Weight gain during young adult life may be one of the most important determinants of future development of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease. Adults who gain weight have increased risk of coronary heart disease compared to those with stable weight. Weight gain during adult life may contribute to future development of ischemic heart disease regardless of initial body weight (obese or non-obese). Canadians of Aboriginal, Chinese, and South Asian (from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka) descent have higher rates of obesity-related chronic diseases (for example diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease). Individuals with lower socio-economic status have higher rates of obesity than those with higher socio-economic status. Promotion of Healthy Weights In April 2002, the Public Health Approaches to the Prevention of Obesity (PHAPO) Working Group of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) identified that a comprehensive approach to obesity prevention should: Address both dietary habits and physical activity patterns of the population Address both societal and individual level factors Address both immediate and distant causes Have multiple focal points and levels of intervention (i.e. at national, regional, community and individual levels); Include both policies and programs; and Build links between sectors that may otherwise be viewed as independent. Required Research Research is needed to: Develop a standard definition and a standard measurement technique for determining obesity in children. Develop obesity measures for older, ethnic and gender specific populations. Identify and develop effective primary prevention methods for individuals, families and communities to reduce the prevalence of obesity in all stages of life. Improve awareness and knowledge about the health effects of obesity and healthy living. Develop effective primary prevention measures and strategies that are therapeutic, secondary and tertiary in nature. Identify and track rates of obesity and overweight in Canada. Assess the effectiveness of obesity prevention and treatment initiatives. Identify and implement the most effective primary prevention strategies for ethnic populations. Develop and implement effective healthy public policy for the prevention, treatment, and management of obesity. Further, the surveillance of obese and overweight Canadians is necessary in order to assess the effectiveness of prevention and treatment initiatives. It is only through the combined action and resources of governments, non-governmental organizations, non-profit and private sectors to develop and implement a comprehensive approach to curb the growing trend of obesity in Canada.
Documents
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Patient bill of health information rights

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9498
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC09-17
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations call on governments to engage patients and the public in the development of a patient bill of health information rights that sets out a vision for the governance of patient health information.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health information and e-health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC09-17
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations call on governments to engage patients and the public in the development of a patient bill of health information rights that sets out a vision for the governance of patient health information.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and provincial/territorial medical associations call on governments to engage patients and the public in the development of a patient bill of health information rights that sets out a vision for the governance of patient health information.
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18 records – page 1 of 2.