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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


29 records – page 1 of 3.

Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
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Adverse events

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9574
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-88
The Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing the importance of disclosing adverse events to affected patients in a timely manner, recommends that regional health authorities, institutions and professional associations develop policies to ensure the confidentiality of medical quality assurance deliberation, unless public notification is required to mitigate any possibility of ongoing harm.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-88
The Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing the importance of disclosing adverse events to affected patients in a timely manner, recommends that regional health authorities, institutions and professional associations develop policies to ensure the confidentiality of medical quality assurance deliberation, unless public notification is required to mitigate any possibility of ongoing harm.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, while recognizing the importance of disclosing adverse events to affected patients in a timely manner, recommends that regional health authorities, institutions and professional associations develop policies to ensure the confidentiality of medical quality assurance deliberation, unless public notification is required to mitigate any possibility of ongoing harm.
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Antibiotic resistant organisms in humans

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9902
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC10-79
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, will work with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada to investigate the agriculture-related release of antibiotic resistant organisms and residual antibiotics into earth and water ecosystems, as well as the role they play in the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms in humans.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC10-79
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, will work with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada to investigate the agriculture-related release of antibiotic resistant organisms and residual antibiotics into earth and water ecosystems, as well as the role they play in the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms in humans.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, will work with Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada to investigate the agriculture-related release of antibiotic resistant organisms and residual antibiotics into earth and water ecosystems, as well as the role they play in the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms in humans.
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Antibiotics in animals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9904
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC10-81
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to investigate animal husbandry techniques that decrease the need for antibiotics in animals and to support techniques proven to be effective.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC10-81
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to investigate animal husbandry techniques that decrease the need for antibiotics in animals and to support techniques proven to be effective.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to investigate animal husbandry techniques that decrease the need for antibiotics in animals and to support techniques proven to be effective.
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CMA Patient Safety Policy Framework (Update 2010)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9747
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2010-02-27
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2010-02-27
Replaces
CMA Patient Safety Policy Framework (2001)
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
CMA PATIENT SAFETY POLICY FRAMEWORK (Update 2010) BACKGROUND The CMA’s mission is to promote the highest standard of health and health care for Canadians. This means, among other things, ensuring that the health care system is safe for patients and providers and effective in achieving good health outcomes for individuals and society. Unfortunately, studies published in recent years have raised concern that health care is not as safe as it could be; data collected by researchers in various countries has shown that there are unacceptably high levels of preventable adverse events, as high as 16% in one study of adverse events associated with hospital admissions. A study conducted by G. R. Baker, P.G. Norton et al, “The Canadian Adverse Events Study: the incidence of adverse events among hospital patients in Canada” showed an adverse event rate of 7.5 per 100 hospital admissions. (1) This suggests that of the nearly 2.5 million hospital admissions yearly in Canada, approximately 185,000 are associated with an adverse event and 70,000 of those possibly preventable. These studies have focused attention on health care error and adverse events, but patient safety requires that participants in the health care system are constantly aware of the risks present in the system, and that risks are addressed proactively - preferably before an adverse event occurs. If a preventable adverse event does occur, it provides an opportunity to learn about and correct sources of error. The CMA considers that a national patient safety strategy, aimed at building a culture of safety, is a priority. This Policy Framework has been developed to provide a clear statement of the CMA’s views on the principles that should underpin a patient safety strategy and to ensure clear support and direction for CMA members and staff involved in patient safety initiatives. PRINCIPLES The Health Care System Outcomes Errors and adverse events are inevitable in any complex system and more complex systems are more prone to errors. Nevertheless, studies have demonstrated an unacceptably high level of preventable adverse events associated with management of health care. 1. Patient safety initiatives should aim to improve health outcomes for patients by minimizing the rate of preventable adverse events and improving the management of events when they occur. Quality 2. Patient safety is one aspect of quality health care; activities relating to patient safety should result in a net increase in the quality of health care. Systemic factors 3. Patient safety initiatives should recognize that error and adverse events occur because of qualities of the system within which individuals operate. A primary concern of initiatives should be to prevent future errors by addressing the system rather than blaming and punishing individuals. Accountability The Canadian public has a reasonable expectation that health care will not result in avoidable injury. 4. Patient safety initiatives should support the accountability of the health sector, including providers, funders and regulators, to patients and the wider public for the safety of health care. Participants in Health Care Patients as partners 5. Patient safety initiatives should promote the role of patients as partners in the provision of safe care, including the prevention and management of adverse events. 6. Patient safety initiatives should encourage and anticipate the full and appropriate disclosure to patients of relevant information that is material to their health and healthcare, including information about adverse events or effects. Professional responsibility and support With a very few exceptions, health care is delivered by competent, caring professionals who are striving to achieve a good outcome for patients. 7. Patient safety initiatives should recognize the responsibility of professionals for achieving and maintaining the standard of their own practice. 8. Patient safety initiatives, while responding appropriately to adverse events, should be sensitive to the professional role and personal well being of individual physicians and other health care providers. Learning and Collaboration 9. Patient safety initiatives should promote and reflect teamwork, communication and collaboration at all levels. 10. Patient safety initiatives should support learning from one’s own experience and the sharing of knowledge so that it is possible to learn from the experience of others. Legal and Regulatory Environment 11. Patient Safety initiatives should promote a legal and regulatory environment that supports open communication and effective management of adverse events. 12. The protection afforded to the opinions expressed within quality assurance committees must be upheld Evidence Base and Evaluation Patient safety initiatives should be based on sound evidence. Patient safety initiatives should contain provision for appropriate evaluation. Patient safety initiatives should contain provision for broad dissemination of findings. PATIENT SAFETY INITIATIVE AREAS Building a culture of safety in Canadian health care will require the collaboration of many different groups and organizations. The CMA can play a leadership role within this larger group and within its own constituency of over 70,000 physicians. In some instances, it will be the CMA’s role to advocate for initiatives that can be delivered only by another provider or through a consortium; in other instances, CMA can assume sole responsibility for taking action. The CMA has identified that, as priorities, it will support: Advocacy for changes to legislation and regulation that would remove disincentives for health care providers to share information about adverse events. Raising awareness of patient safety and changing attitudes towards risk, error and adverse events within the health care community. Developing and providing resources such as clinical practice guidelines and information technology systems that have been shown to standardize practice and reduce adverse events. Reporting systems that collect and aggregate data on risks so that good practices can be developed and shared. Education and training for health care professionals and managers to provide them with the conceptual and practical tools to introduce change into their practice and organizations. Advocacy for, and development of, an agenda for patient safety research in Canada. The involvement of government at all levels in supporting and committing resources to initiatives for improved patient safety. GLOSSARY Adverse event – any unintended injury or complication that is caused by health care management rather than the patient’s disease and that leads to prolonged hospital stay, morbidity or mortality. Adverse events do not necessarily result from error, for example a toxic reaction to a drug in a patient without apparent risk factors for the reaction. Error – the failure of a planned action to be completed as intended (“error of execution”) or the use of a wrong plan to achieve an aim (“error of planning”). An error may not result in an adverse event if the error does not result in harm or is intercepted. Risk – the chance of injury or loss as defined as a measure of the probability and severity of an adverse effect to health, property, the environment or other things of value. (1) G. Ross Baker, Peter G. Norton, Virginia Flintoft, Régis Blais, Adalsteinn Brown, Jafna Cox, Ed Etchells, William A. Ghali, Philip Hébert, Sumit R. Majumdar, Maeve O'Beirne, Luz Palacios-Derflingher, Robert J. Reid, Sam Sheps, and Robyn Tamblyn. The Canadian Adverse Events Study: the incidence of adverse events among hospital patients in Canada Can. Med. Assoc. J., May 2004; 170: 1678 - 1686.
Documents
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CMA statement on emerging therapies

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10352
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
26-08-2010
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
26-08-2010
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
CMA Statement on Emerging Therapies The CMA is keenly aware of the heart-rending suffering experienced by MS patients and the devastating impact it has on families and we recognize how desperately they are seeking treatments to alleviate their symptoms. Physicians and researchers dedicate their lives to finding new treatments to prevent and ease the suffering of patients while supporting those battling disease. Along with the physician's care and compassion, clinical research is a key weapon in the battle to manage and treat disease. The CMA believes that all medical decisions must be based upon scientific evidence. That is at the heart of our commitment to patient-centred care. The CMA is committed to the principle that, before any new treatment is adopted and applied by the medical profession, it must first be rigorously tested and recognized as evidence-based. This principle is highly relevant in the case of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) recent recommendations. The CMA concurs with the CIHR's position on the need for an evidence-based approach to the development of clinical trials of the recently proposed condition called "chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency" (CCSVI). We would hope that the findings of the seven diagnostic studies that are underway will be shared and analyzed as soon as they become available, and that clinical intervention trials would be supported as indicated by the evidence and if researchers come forward with scientifically sound ethical protocols. If additional Canadian funding bodies initiate clinical research in the area, we would encourage CIHR to provide advice if requested.
Documents
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Comprehensive pregnancy care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9882
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC10-84
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliate and associate organizations, and other stakeholders to further develop educational materials for primary care providers and women on the importance of pre-pregnancy and early-pregnancy health, and early access to comprehensive pregnancy care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC10-84
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliate and associate organizations, and other stakeholders to further develop educational materials for primary care providers and women on the importance of pre-pregnancy and early-pregnancy health, and early access to comprehensive pregnancy care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliate and associate organizations, and other stakeholders to further develop educational materials for primary care providers and women on the importance of pre-pregnancy and early-pregnancy health, and early access to comprehensive pregnancy care.
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Electronic health records

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9543
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health information and e-health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-47
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to demand that governments recognize that the flow of information from the patient record to the electronic health records is the professional responsibility of physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health information and e-health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-47
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to demand that governments recognize that the flow of information from the patient record to the electronic health records is the professional responsibility of physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to demand that governments recognize that the flow of information from the patient record to the electronic health records is the professional responsibility of physicians.
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Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (Update 2009)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9489
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2009-05-31
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2009-05-31
Replaces
Fetal alcohol syndrome (Update 2000)
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDER (UPDATE 2009) Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of environment-related birth defects and developmental disabilities in North America. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) believes that the prudent choice for women who are or may become pregnant is to abstain from alcohol, and encourages their partners to support them in this endeavour. The CMA urges Canadian governments to enact legislation that requires alcoholic beverages sold in Canada to be labelled with warnings of the hazards of consuming alcohol during pregnancy. The CMA also calls upon the federal government to examine the role that advertising plays in promoting the consumption of alcoholic beverages and to review existing policies and regulations in this area. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term used to describe the range of disabilities and diagnoses that result from drinking alcohol during pregnancy. It is estimated that more than 3,000 babies in Canada are born with FASD every year. Those who live with FASD may have mild to very severe problems with their health. They may have delays in their development, intellectual problems and problems in their social lives. Examples of these include: * skeletal abnormalities such as facial deformities * physical disabilities such as kidney and internal organ problems * depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder * difficulty understanding the consequences of their actions These disabilities are lifelong and those affected may need lifelong support. The drinking patterns of teenagers and the potential for women of reproductive age to consume alcohol mean that the health care system must actively address the prevention of FASD. Also, alcohol use may play a considerable role in unplanned pregnancy and inadequate prenatal and postnatal care. The CMA strongly supports all activities that encourage Canadians to moderate their alcohol consumption. The association encourages the public to be aware of the issues related to alcohol consumption, particularly the adverse effects on the fetus. In a continued effort to support the reduction of alcohol consumption, the CMA urges Canadian governments to enact legislation that requires alcoholic beverages sold in Canada to be labelled with warnings of the hazards of alcohol consumption during pregnancy.1 Appropriate agencies should also adopt regulations and/or policies to ensure that warnings about the adverse interaction between alcohol and both prescription and non-prescription products are prominently displayed or distributed wherever alcohol and drugs are sold or dispensed.2 The CMA also calls upon the federal government to examine the role that advertising plays in promoting the consumption of alcoholic beverages and to review existing policies and regulations in this area. The adverse effects of alcohol consumption by pregnant women are preventable. The CMA believes that the prudent choice for women who are or may become pregnant is to abstain from alcohol and encourages their partners to support them in this endeavour. Physicians should use appropriate screening methods to identify alcohol use in their patients. Physicians can play a leading role in educating and counselling women, spouses and family members about the dangers of alcohol to the fetus. The CMA also recommends that alcohol and drug addiction treatment services give high priority to the needs of pregnant women seeking help. 1 General Council resolution 89-67: That the Canadian Medical Association urge Governments in Canada to enact legislation requiring that all alcoholic beverages sold in Canada be labelled with warnings on the hazard from the consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Note: this motion was rescinded because it was superseded by the Policy on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (2000). 2 General Council resolution 87-31
Documents
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Front-line care providers in epidemics

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9571
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC09-85
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates urge governments to ensure that front-line care providers in practice and training are provided with adequate information, resources (including ventilators, masks, gloves, medications and vaccines) and personal and family disability and life insurance if performing clinical duties in the context of an epidemic or other public health emergency.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC09-85
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates urge governments to ensure that front-line care providers in practice and training are provided with adequate information, resources (including ventilators, masks, gloves, medications and vaccines) and personal and family disability and life insurance if performing clinical duties in the context of an epidemic or other public health emergency.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates urge governments to ensure that front-line care providers in practice and training are provided with adequate information, resources (including ventilators, masks, gloves, medications and vaccines) and personal and family disability and life insurance if performing clinical duties in the context of an epidemic or other public health emergency.
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29 records – page 1 of 3.