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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


17 records – page 1 of 2.

2015 revision of the World Medical Association statement on nuclear weapons

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11871
Date
2016-02-27
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD16-04-105
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the 2015 revision of the World Medical Association Statement on Nuclear Weapons (https://www.wma.net/policies-post/wma-statement-on-nuclear-weapons/) [Please copy and paste this link into your web browser.]
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-02-27
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD16-04-105
The Canadian Medical Association endorses the 2015 revision of the World Medical Association Statement on Nuclear Weapons (https://www.wma.net/policies-post/wma-statement-on-nuclear-weapons/) [Please copy and paste this link into your web browser.]
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The Canadian Medical Association endorses the 2015 revision of the World Medical Association Statement on Nuclear Weapons (https://www.wma.net/policies-post/wma-statement-on-nuclear-weapons/) [Please copy and paste this link into your web browser.]
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Bill C-224, Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11910
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-40
The Canadian Medical Association supports Bill C-224, Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-40
The Canadian Medical Association supports Bill C-224, Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act.
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The Canadian Medical Association supports Bill C-224, Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act.
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Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11905
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC16-34
The Canadian Medical Association calls for the addition of low-risk guidelines specific to people aged 65 or older to augment "Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines."
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC16-34
The Canadian Medical Association calls for the addition of low-risk guidelines specific to people aged 65 or older to augment "Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines."
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for the addition of low-risk guidelines specific to people aged 65 or older to augment "Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines."
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Canadian guideline for safe and effective use of opioids for chronic pain

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11901
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-30
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that the Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain include consideration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors specific to older adults.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Resolution
GC16-30
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that the Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain include consideration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors specific to older adults.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that the Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain include consideration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors specific to older adults.
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Coalition for healthy school food

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11911
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-41
The Canadian Medical Association will become a member of the "Coalition for Healthy School Food."
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-41
The Canadian Medical Association will become a member of the "Coalition for Healthy School Food."
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The Canadian Medical Association will become a member of the "Coalition for Healthy School Food."
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Cost of neuropsychological assessments

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11912
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC16-55
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of the cost of neuropsychological assessments of all patients suspected of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder as an insured-benefit.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC16-55
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of the cost of neuropsychological assessments of all patients suspected of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder as an insured-benefit.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of the cost of neuropsychological assessments of all patients suspected of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder as an insured-benefit.
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Front-of-package labelling consultation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13800
Date
2016-10-31
Topics
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2016-10-31
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Text
The CMA believes that governments have a responsibility to provide guidance on healthy eating that can be easily incorporated into daily lives, and that the federal government has a continuous obligation to promulgate policies, standards, regulations and legislations that support healthy food and beverage choices. In this regard, CMA policy has encouraged governments to continue to work to reduce the salt, sugar, saturated fat, trans fat and calorie content of processed foods and prepared meals; provide user-friendly consumer information including complete nutritional content and accurate advertising claims; and increase the amount of information provided on product labels.1 We commend Health Canada on recent work on updating the nutrition facts table and the current revision of the Canada Food Guide and are very pleased to provide a response to the consumer questionnaire on the Health Canada proposal for front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labelling. FOP nutrition labelling approach and possible symbols Do you support Health Canada's proposal to use a symbol to identify foods that are high in sodium, sugars and/or saturated fat? Please explain. In 2011, appearing before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, the CMA supported a standard "at a glance" approach to FOP food labelling that can reduce confusion and help consumers make informed dietary choices.2 There is a growing body of evidence linking the consumption of diets high in saturated fats, sugars or sodium to cardiovascular and chronic disease (hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, obesity, cancer, and heart disease and stroke) - leading preventable risk factors and causes of death and disability within Canada and worldwide. Therefore, the CMA does support the proposal to use a symbol for "high in" FOP labelling of foods high in sugar, sodium or saturated fats. FOP labelling on packaged foods may help Canadians make healthier food choices. It will draw attention to those ingredients to be avoided in higher levels and can reinforce public health messaging on healthy eating. An added benefit may be an incentive to the food industry to reformulate processed foods with lower amounts of those nutrients highlighted in FOP labelling. Which symbol would help you recognize foods high in sodium, sugars and/or saturated fat? Please explain. Of the proposed symbols, we believe that those that resemble a stop sign would send a strong and recognizable signal of a food to avoid. The triangle yield sign shape is too similar to the shape often used to indicate a hazard such as poison. We would recommend holding focus groups with Canadians to better understand how the proposed symbols will be understood by consumers. Foods that do not have nutrition labelling Do you think these foods should be exempt from FOP symbols even if they're high in sodium, sugars and/or saturated fat? Please explain. The CMA can support the exemption of FOP labelling for products in very small packages but we would like to see a provision to include information on "high in" sugar, salt or saturated fats on foods such as sausages, bakery products, prepared dishes from the deli produced and prepackaged by grocery stores/retailers as they are categories of foods often high in these nutrients. A "high in" sticker could be added to the retailer's packaging to be consistent with other packaged foods. Nutrient levels for a "high in" FOP label Do you think the proposed nutrient levels make sense to identify foods that are high in sodium, sugars and/or saturated fat? Please explain. The CMA supports the proposed nutrient levels to identify foods high in sugar, salt or saturated fats. The CMA believes that it is important that there is consistency across all nutritional and healthy eating information and advice for Canadians. Ensuring that the "high in" threshold and the 15% "a lot" daily value (DV) message are consistent delivers a clear message of concern. While we understand the rationale behind increasing the nutrient threshold for prepackaged meals to 30% of the DV, we suggest that the threshold for "high in" sugar of 30 grams or more total sugars per serving of stated size may be too high and should be reconsidered. It should also be noted that the different thresholds on prepackaged foods and prepackaged meals may cause confusion for consumers and should be introduced with some consumer education. Updating nutrient content claims and other nutrition-related statements Do you support not allowing a "no added sugars" claim on foods high in sugars? Please explain. Allowing a food that qualifies for a "high in" sugar FOP symbol to also display a "no added sugars" claim would be very confusing to consumers. The product label information would appear as quite contradictory; therefore the CMA does support not allowing "no added sugar" claims on these foods. The CMA would suggest that a food that is high in two or more of sugar, sodium or saturated fats not be allowed to display any content claims to avoid any consumer confusion. Labelling of foods that have sweeteners Do you support that these sweeteners be declared in the list of ingredients only, rather than in the list of ingredients and the front of the package? Please explain. We do not support the elimination of the labelling requirement for artificial sweeteners on the principle display panel. For products that have high intensity sweeteners added and which bear claims such as "unsweetened" or "no sugar added," a declaration of "artificially sweetened" should be clearly visible on the FOP. The specific sweetener does not need to be identified so long as it is declared in the list of ingredients. As long as quantity is displayed on the nutrition facts table it doesn't need to be on the principal display. For many Canadians, their diet can have a negative rather than positive impact on their overall health. There is a particular concern for children and youth who are growing up in increasingly obesogenic environments that reinforce practices that work against a healthy diet and healthy lifestyle. Determined action is required for children and youth to learn and acquire healthy behaviours that they will maintain throughout their life. The CMA supports the government's Healthy Living Strategy and their efforts to create a healthier food environment. The addition of FOP nutrition labelling is an important tool to make the healthy choice the easy choice. Sincerely, Jeff Blackmer, MD, MHSc, FRCPC Vice-president, Medical Professionalism 1 Healthy Behaviours: Promoting Physical Activity and Healthy Eating, Canadian Medical Association Policy, 2014, accessed at http://policybase.cma.ca. 2 Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, Nutrition Labelling, Canadian Medical Association, March 3, 2011 accessed at http://policybase.cma.ca --------------- ------------------------------------------------------------ --------------- ------------------------------------------------------------
Documents
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Health Canada’s Consultation on “Plain and Standardized Packaging”

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13817
Date
2016-08-12
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2016-08-12
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Pharmaceuticals/ prescribing/ cannabis/ marijuana/ drugs
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide this submission in response to Health Canada’s Consultation on “Plain and Standardized Packaging” for Tobacco Products. Potential Measures for Regulating the Appearance, Shape and Size of Tobacco Packages and of Tobacco Products. Document for Consultation, May 2016. Canada's physicians have been working for decades toward the goal of a smoke-free Canada. The CMA issued its first public warning concerning the hazards of tobacco in 1954 and has continued to advocate for the strongest possible measures to control its use. The CMA has been a leader in advocating for plain and standardized packaging for tobacco products for many years. We established our position in 1986 when we passed a resolution at our General Council in Vancouver recommending to the federal government “that all tobacco products be sold in plain packages of standard size with the words "this product is injurious to your health" printed in the same size lettering as the brand name, and that no extraneous information be printed on the package.” Over the past 30 years we have reiterated our long-standing support for the concept of tobacco products being sold in standardized packages in several briefs and policy statements. The current Health Canada proposal will help realize that goal and the CMA supports the measures outlined in the consultation paper. There are two elements that the CMA recommend be addressed in this consultation. The CMA recommends that only the “slide-and-shell” style of package be authorized and that the “flip-top” package be removed. This would reduce the permitted style to one standard package and allow for the largest possible surface area to be used to convey health warnings and other health-related information. In a similar vein, the CMA recommends a single allowable length of cigarette and that a minimum diameter or width be established. The purpose is to eliminate the sale of “slims” and “super slims” cigarettes to eliminate the possibility of these products as being considered “healthier.” While the CMA supports these measures, they must be part of the overall goal of further reducing and eliminating smoking. These measures will be an essential element of a sustained, well-funded and comprehensive program to reduce tobacco use, combining policy interventions with educational and social-marketing interventions including mass media campaigns. These programs should reflect current best practices, and be evaluated regularly for effectiveness and impact. To that end, the CMA calls on the federal government to renew the Tobacco Strategy before it expires in March 2017. At the same time, the CMA also recommends that the government allocate adequate funding to ensure implementation of the strategy. Finally, the consultation paper closes with some potential challenges to the implementation of these proposals. With respect to the problem of counterfeit cigarettes, all levels of government should take the strongest possible measures to control the sale and distribution of contraband tobacco, on their own and in cooperation with other affected jurisdictions. The problem of retailers having difficulty implementing the regulations, resulting in service delays to their customers, is not really an issue related to these proposals. It is very doubtful that the retailers will experience such problems for very long and will find ways of resolving such difficulties. As for the problem of the manufacturers continuing to innovate in order to circumvent these measures, there should be sufficient enforcement tools within the regulations that will enable Health Canada to deal with such infractions. The Canadian Medical Association remains committed to working with governments and stakeholders to address this issue. We reiterate our long-standing support for plain and standardized packaging for tobacco products. In summary, the CMA recommends that: 1) only the “slide-and-shell” style of package be authorized and that the “flip-top” package be removed; 2) a single allowable length of cigarette and that a minimum diameter or width be established; 3) the federal government renew the Tobacco Strategy before it expires in March 2017 and that that the government allocate adequate funding to ensure implementation of the strategy. Sincerely, Jeff Blackmer, MD, MHSc, FRCPC Vice-President, Medical Professionalism
Vice-président, Professionnalisme médicale Canadian Medical Association
Association médicale canadienne
Documents
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Health-impact assessments for projects involving hydraulic fracturing

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11916
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-45
The Canadian Medical Association supports incorporating full-cost accounting, including greenhouse gas emissions and water-usage impacts, into health-impact assessments for projects involving hydraulic fracturing for unconventional oil and gas reserves.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-45
The Canadian Medical Association supports incorporating full-cost accounting, including greenhouse gas emissions and water-usage impacts, into health-impact assessments for projects involving hydraulic fracturing for unconventional oil and gas reserves.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports incorporating full-cost accounting, including greenhouse gas emissions and water-usage impacts, into health-impact assessments for projects involving hydraulic fracturing for unconventional oil and gas reserves.
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Insurance coverage

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11923
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC16-47
The Canadian Medical Association calls for regulations to prevent insurance providers from requesting invasive and/or potentially harmful medical procedures or tests as a condition of obtaining insurance coverage.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC16-47
The Canadian Medical Association calls for regulations to prevent insurance providers from requesting invasive and/or potentially harmful medical procedures or tests as a condition of obtaining insurance coverage.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for regulations to prevent insurance providers from requesting invasive and/or potentially harmful medical procedures or tests as a condition of obtaining insurance coverage.
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17 records – page 1 of 2.