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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


19 records – page 2 of 2.

Primary care renewal

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy114
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC03-27
That Canadian Medical Association encourage proper evaluation of primary care renewal to ensure that the renewal is improving access and health care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC03-27
That Canadian Medical Association encourage proper evaluation of primary care renewal to ensure that the renewal is improving access and health care.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association encourage proper evaluation of primary care renewal to ensure that the renewal is improving access and health care.
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Protecting the national blood supply from the West Nile Virus : CMA Submission to House of Commons Standing Committee on Health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1964
Last Reviewed
2010-02-27
Date
2003-02-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2010-02-27
Date
2003-02-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Text
INTRODUCTION On behalf of its more than 54,000 members, the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health with recommendations in regard to protecting the national blood supply from the West Nile Virus (WNV). As physicians, we understand both the perceived and actual risks associated with blood-borne diseases and the impact on individuals, families and communities. BACKGROUND WNV has emerged in North America, presenting a threat to public, animal and equine health. The most serious human manifestation of WNV infection is fatal encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). WNV is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito and can infect people, many types of birds, horses and some other animals. Most people who become infected with WNV will have either no symptoms or only mild ones. However, on rare occasions, WNV infection can result in severe and sometimes fatal illnesses. Certain people, including seniors, the young and those with weak immune systems, are at greater risk for serious health effects. In 2002, West Nile Virus was documented in five provinces (Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan). Further to this, the United States Centre for Disease Control and Prevention reported the first documented cases of person-to-person West Nile Virus transmission through organ transplantation, blood and blood product transfusion and possibly breastfeeding. It is imperative that the risk associated with the transmission of West Nile Virus through blood transfusions be minimized. We understand that the Canadian Blood Services (CBS) is working towards a validated laboratory test which may be available by the next mosquito season and that in the absence of this test there are a number of contingency plans. It appears that the CBS and Hema Quebec are maintaining vigilance and maximizing efforts towards controlling contamination through blood. This is commendable. We believe that these efforts are one component of what is required to maintain the health and safety of Canadians from the spread of known and emerging diseases. A second component is to ensure that communication about WNV to the public is accurate, timely and consistent. Effective risk communication is imperative not only to promote a safe blood supply, but also to manage risk perception associated with a positive test for WNV. A comprehensive approach is required to protect the public from emerging health problems such as the WNV. A strong public health infrastructure is necessary to ensure that governments are able to protect and promote health and to prevent illness. This involves prevention, early detection, containment, communication and information dissemination. STRENGTHENING PUBLIC HEALTH Through its public health infrastructure, society protects and promotes health and works to prevent illness, injury and disability. In today’s world these public health functions require an increasingly specialized and well-trained workforce; sophisticated surveillance, monitoring and information systems; and adequate and continuously available laboratory support. Its ultimate effectiveness, however, depends upon the ability of the system to communicate crucial information and health advice to the right professionals in real time, when they need it. The devastating impact of the failure to effectively communicate essential information is evident in examples as diverse, yet dramatic, as the tragedy of Walkerton and the untimely death of Vanessa Young. In both cases the information health professionals needed to make optimum decisions was not accessible in a reliable and timely manner. Reports indicate that across this country public health workers are stretched to the limit to perform routine work. The public health infrastructure is put to the test further whenever there is a disaster, large or small, in Canada and, not withstanding best efforts, it does not always pass. The public health system is also challenged by the potential for a disconnect in communications between differing jurisdictions that may be found when, for example, First Nations communities under federal jurisdiction overlap areas of provincial/territorial jurisdiction. In the aftermath of 9/11 and the anthrax scare in the United States, Canadians must be assured of a rapid, knowledgeable, expert response to emergency public health challenges. Commissioner Roy Romanow suggests in the recent report of the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care that “a portion of the proposed new Primary Health Care Transfer should be targeted to expanding efforts by provinces and territories to prevent illnesses and injuries, promote good health, and integrate those activities with primary health care.” The Fifth Report of the Senate Committee on Science, Technology and Social Affairs, chaired by Senator Kirby, notes that “The major problem with public health programs is that funding is low, and usually unstable or inconsistent. As a result, the public health infrastructure in Canada is under considerable stress and has deteriorated substantially in recent years.” The Senate Committee recommended that the federal government, “ensure strong leadership and provide additional funding of $200 million to sustain, better coordinate and integrate the public health infrastructure in Canada as well as relevant health promotion efforts.” During the First Ministers’ meeting in September 2000, the First Ministers committed to strengthening their investments and commitments to public health, including the development of strategies and policies that recognize the determinants of health, enhance disease prevention and improve public health. They made several commitments towards achieving the goal, including: * Promoting those public services, programs and policies that extend beyond care and treatment and which make a critical contribution to the health and wellness of Canadians; * Addressing key priorities for health care renewal and supporting innovations to meet the current and emerging needs of Canadians; * Reporting regularly to Canadians on health status, health outcomes, and the performance of publicly funded health services, and the actions taken to improve these services. In 1999, the Auditor General found Health Canada unprepared to fulfill its responsibilities in public health; communication between multiple agencies was poor and weaknesses in the key surveillance system impeded the effective monitoring of communicable and noncommunicable diseases and injuries. In 1997, Justice Horace Krever reported that the “public health departments in many parts of Canada do not have sufficient resources to carry out their duties.” RECOMMENDATIONS The capacity of the public health care sector to deliver disease prevention and health promotion programs in Canada is currently inadequate, and its ability to respond varies from coast to coast. This is due to a lack of trained professionals and a lack of operational funds. Enhanced commitments are needed from governments at all levels to ensure that adequate human resources and infrastructure are in place to respond to public health issues when they arise. This includes the expansion of the public health training programs to enhance the resources in this field. The ability of the public health system to respond to these issues has a direct impact on the wellbeing of the people of Canada in a manner as important as the ability of the acute care system to respond to medical emergencies. Therefore the CMA recommends that: The federal government invest in human resources and infrastructure needed to develop an adequate and effective public health system capable of responding to emerging public health issues. The public health system is complex and multifactorial. It is therefore imperative that different departments and sectors coordinate and communicate effectively to coordinate efforts and avoid duplication. The development of an adequate surveillance system and consideration of mandatory reporting of WNV infections in humans is one component of this requirement. In addition to collecting these data, a more extensive communication and dissemination plan should be developed to enhance the impact of skilled professionals, programs and policies. Responsible messaging should be developed in a timely manner, for the public and for individuals who are detected to have (or previously had) a WNV infection. Such messaging must carefully balance public awareness of risk against threats to the CBS/Hema Quebec donor pool and the creation of anxiety in people who need to use blood or blood products. It is essential that the federal government take a leadership role to ensure that the communication tools and information technology necessary to enable a more rapid and informed response to situations such as identification of emerging diseases in the blood supply, natural disasters, disease outbreaks, newly discovered adverse drug reactions, and man-made disasters or bio-terrorism are accessible in real time in all regions of the country. In its pre budget submission, the CMA called on the government to strengthen the public health system to ensure that governments are able to protect and promote health and to prevent illness. This involves the detection of emerging health problems, like West Nile Virus transmission, as well as containment, communication and information dissemination. Therefore the CMA recommends that: The federal government provide a one-time infusion of $30 million for the creation of a R.R.E.A.L (Rapid, Reliable, Effective, Accessible and Linked) Health Communication and Coordination Initiative which would strengthen Canada’s public health infrastructure and enhance coordination and communication amongst all levels of government, public health officials, health educators, community service providers, physicians and organizations such as the Canadian Blood Service/Hema Quebec, Canadian Public Health Association and the Canadian Medical Association.
Documents
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Publicly funded health care in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9513
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-34
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, calls on governments and health authorities to examine internal market mechanisms, which could include a role for the private sector, in the delivery of publicly funded health care in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-34
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, calls on governments and health authorities to examine internal market mechanisms, which could include a role for the private sector, in the delivery of publicly funded health care in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, calls on governments and health authorities to examine internal market mechanisms, which could include a role for the private sector, in the delivery of publicly funded health care in Canada.
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Quality assurance committees

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9573
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-87
The Canadian Medical Association in collaboration with the provincial/territorial medical associations will vigorously oppose all attempts to remove legislated evidentiary protection currently afforded to those expressing opinions before quality assurance committees.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-87
The Canadian Medical Association in collaboration with the provincial/territorial medical associations will vigorously oppose all attempts to remove legislated evidentiary protection currently afforded to those expressing opinions before quality assurance committees.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association in collaboration with the provincial/territorial medical associations will vigorously oppose all attempts to remove legislated evidentiary protection currently afforded to those expressing opinions before quality assurance committees.
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Salt content in processed food

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9528
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-93
The Canadian Medical Association will work with other national health care organizations to inform and educate Canadians about the adverse impact salt intake has on hypertension and cardiovascular disease and to lobby the food industry to reduce the salt content in processed food.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-93
The Canadian Medical Association will work with other national health care organizations to inform and educate Canadians about the adverse impact salt intake has on hypertension and cardiovascular disease and to lobby the food industry to reduce the salt content in processed food.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with other national health care organizations to inform and educate Canadians about the adverse impact salt intake has on hypertension and cardiovascular disease and to lobby the food industry to reduce the salt content in processed food.
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Sharing patient health information

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9576
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-113
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canada Revenue Agency to collaborate with Service Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada to reduce redundant requests by sharing relevant patient health information, while at the same time respecting the privacy and confidentiality of patient records.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-113
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canada Revenue Agency to collaborate with Service Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada to reduce redundant requests by sharing relevant patient health information, while at the same time respecting the privacy and confidentiality of patient records.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canada Revenue Agency to collaborate with Service Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada to reduce redundant requests by sharing relevant patient health information, while at the same time respecting the privacy and confidentiality of patient records.
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Smoking cessation in hospitals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy129
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-31
That Canadian Medical Association call upon the provincial and territorial governments to provide resources for every hospital to offer smoking cessation, counseling support including medication to every smoking patient in hospital and as needed after discharge.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2003-08-20
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC03-31
That Canadian Medical Association call upon the provincial and territorial governments to provide resources for every hospital to offer smoking cessation, counseling support including medication to every smoking patient in hospital and as needed after discharge.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association call upon the provincial and territorial governments to provide resources for every hospital to offer smoking cessation, counseling support including medication to every smoking patient in hospital and as needed after discharge.
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Standardized Packaging for Tobacco

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9732
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2009-12-05
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
BD10-03-78
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) calls on the federal government to require that tobacco products be sold in standardized packages of uniform shape and size.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2009-12-05
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
BD10-03-78
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) calls on the federal government to require that tobacco products be sold in standardized packages of uniform shape and size.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) calls on the federal government to require that tobacco products be sold in standardized packages of uniform shape and size.
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Testing homes for radon

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9525
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-77
The Canadian Medical Association encourages all Canadians, and especially those who smoke tobacco, to test their homes for radon.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC09-77
The Canadian Medical Association encourages all Canadians, and especially those who smoke tobacco, to test their homes for radon.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages all Canadians, and especially those who smoke tobacco, to test their homes for radon.
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19 records – page 2 of 2.