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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


38 records – page 1 of 4.

Principles for health system governance

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10320
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2011-10-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2011-10-23
Replaces
Regionalization (Update 2001)
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Text
Principles for Health System Governance This policy provides principles and recommendations for developing, implementing and evaluating health system governance models such as regionalized health care for the purposes of delivering high quality care to patients. Since the 1990s, health care systems in many countries including Canada have been searching for more effective health system governance models to accomplish a variety of health policy objectives. These objectives include funding health care based on population health needs and improving service delivery integration. In Canada, most provinces and territories moved to a regionalized model of health system governance during the 1990s. This "regionalization" approach involved both decentralizing and centralizing specific elements of the health care system. Decentralizing involved moving planning, budgeting and decision making authority from the provincial or territorial level to certain regional bodies. Centralizing involved moving the planning and governance of health care and medical services from individual institutions or agencies to a regional body. In terms of the delivery of health care services, centralization often occurred through the consolidation of several programs into a single program for a region and through the merger and closure of individual institutions. Since 2003, several provincial governments initiated new changes to their approach to health system governance ranging from vertical integration involving a range of health agencies under a single board (e.g., Quebec) to the creation of boards that oversee the delivery of care for larger portions of a jurisdiction or even the entire jurisdiction itself (e.g., Alberta Health Services). Many of these new models involve an arm's length authority governed by an appointed board that is mandated to manage and integrate the operations of the health system across the province/territory while leaving the ministry of health to set the overall plan and priorities for the health system as well as set standards and monitor outcomes. No doubt, governments will continue to search for an ideal health system governance and delivery model as part of an effort to develop "high performing health systems". Examples of high performing health systems exist at all levels such as at regional levels within countries (e.g., Jonkoping, Sweden) or at the client group level (e.g., US Veterans Health Administration). Health system governance models, such as health regions or health agencies, must have an overall goal of ensuring the delivery of high quality, timely and accessible care to its citizens. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement's (IHI) Triple Aim concept identifies three objectives for health systems: improve the health of the population; improve the health care experience for patients; and improve the value for money spent on health and health care. Many previous health system reforms have not resulted in improved care for patients. The CMA's 2010 action plan, Health Care Transformation in Canada: Change that Works. Care that Lasts, calls for patient-centred health care that puts the patients and their families' interests first. From the health provider perspective, previous regionalization efforts have raised several issues of concern, including whether these models translate into improved delivery of care for patients. There is also concern with the prospect that new models will limit provider involvement in health system governance and that health human resource planning will be localized when mobility of labour transcends local borders. The CMA is committed to playing a positive role in the debate on the future of health care reform in Canada. It recognizes that health system governance models are subject to change. However, this CMA policy on health system governance identifies fundamental principles that should guide any model under consideration. These guiding principles draw upon previous CMA work starting in 1991 with its Working Group on Regionalization, leading to its Language of Health System Reform report. Guiding principles Patient-centred: Any consideration of governance models must begin with an overall goal of providing patient-centred care-seamless access to the continuum of care in a timely manner, based on need and not the ability to pay, that takes into consideration the individual needs and preferences of the patient and his/her family, and treats the patient with respect and dignity. Defined objectives: The development and implementation of health system governance models/strategies must begin with a clear statement of objectives. The objectives should reflect the changes that need to be made to the health care system to address specific problems and, whenever possible, must be defined in measurable terms so that health system governance policies can be evaluated. Accountability/authority: Aligning accountability and authority is essential to effective and sustainable high performing health systems. Accountability is affected by the degree of authority and the scope of responsibilities (i.e., planning, administration, organization and funding of health care services) transferred to the governing units (e.g., regions). Who is accountable, and for what, need to be defined. There needs to be a clear statement of the roles of government, governing boards, physicians and all health care stakeholders. Physicians have a unique contribution to make and their views should be taken into account in any restructuring of the health care delivery system. Needs based planning/Responsive to regional needs: The definition of the region(s) or sub-regions should reflect the natural, socio-political and geographic divisions of the population. Once regions are defined, the health care needs of the population served by regional units should be determined through epidemiological studies, input from communities and other needs assessment. In addition to local planning, there is also the need for broader based planning to address medical and scientific research, new technologies and procedures. Regional health needs can vary requiring flexible delivery models. Credentialing that meets jurisdictional standards should be maintained at the regional level in order to effectively respond to regional needs and issues. Informed choice: Any form of health system governance should not restrict patients' mobility between providers or regions, physicians' mobility between and within regions, or physicians' choice of practice setting by limiting employment to community health centres or other forms of group practice. Participatory democracy Both patients/public and providers should be involved in determining governance models and participating in the ongoing governance of health systems. If providers are to be encouraged to get involved, they need to have ready access to the planning and administrative skills needed to participate effectively and make a valuable contribution to management and leadership. Three key areas in which providers must become knowledgeable and involved include governance and credentialing, health care needs assessment and health economics. Clinical autonomy: Physicians have a responsibility to advocate on behalf of their patients to ensure the availability of needed care. This responsibility should not be hindered by a physician's practice setting, mode of remuneration or paying agency. Evaluation: Evaluation protocols must be built into health system governance models at the outset, and the results of evaluation must be used to "fine tune" and improve the strategies. These protocols should address cost effectiveness, population health status, patient access to health care services and the interests of government, the profession and the public. Standards for reasonable access: Certain areas and cultural groups do not have the same level of access to health care services as the national norm. All health system governance models should address these shortcomings to ensure that the entire population of any given region has reasonable access to primary, secondary and tertiary care. Balancing access and affordability: One of the implicit objectives of new models of health system governance appears to be achieving both control over health care costs and redirecting expenditures from health care to community and social services. Governing authorities must be careful to maintain a balance between access to health care services and affordability allowing for a variety of methods to achieve this (e.g., internal markets). They must also maintain a comprehensive accounting of the cost of implementing any new model. Balancing curative with preventive and sustaining care: All health system governance models must support not only the system's ability to provide curative care but also an ability to provide effective preventive and sustaining care. Governance models should ensure funds can be allocated toward a comprehensive approach to care as well as allow for models of care that support all three functions. Support for medical education and research: Policies and structures of health system governance models need to acknowledge and foster the role of medical education and research in the health care system. Governance of medical teaching and research should reside within the academic health sciences centres. These centres should be assured of adequate financial and human resources and of access to cross regional patient populations and to community teaching sites in order to provide adequate learning and research opportunities. Recommendations With regard to the development, implementation and evaluation of health system governance models, the CMA recommends that: * advocacy on behalf of patients and physicians be maintained irrespective of any regional administrative boundaries; * governments ensure that the introduction of new models of health system governance do not interfere with clinical autonomy and professional freedom in the context of the physician/patient relationship; * governments, health governing authorities and institutions ensure that physicians, through their professional associations, are included in the development and revision of practitioner/medical staff bylaws and appointment policies; * family physicians, on the basis of their education, training and skills, are reaffirmed as the preferred point of entry into Canada's health care system; * governments ensure that catchment area under the governing authority be defined in a way that is sensitive to the political, cultural and geographic circumstances of the population and recognizes established patterns of the demand for, and the provision of, health care; * governments ensure that the introduction of new governance models does not interfere with reasonable access by the population to medical services at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels; * leadership be provided to help ensure that the development, implementation and evaluation of health system governance models are based on clear, measurable objectives; * governments develop and maintain national standards for access to high quality health care, medical education and research, irrespective of regional boundaries; * governments ensure that programs and policies under any form of health system governance be designed and implemented in a manner that supports key principles of medical education and research, including: - the governance and resources required for medical teaching, both in the academic health sciences centres and in appropriate community based sites throughout the province or territory, - academic health sciences centres' responsibilities for providing secondary and tertiary care to catchment populations that cut across regional boundaries, and - the need for academic physician resource plans to ensure a critical mass for teaching and research; * governments give priority to mechanisms to protect the mobility of patients and physicians when developing and implementing programs under any new health system governance model; and * the medical profession work with governments to develop: - clear role, responsibility and accountability statements for government, health system governing boards, health care providers and consumers, - mechanisms to ensure that governing boards have broad representation and meaningful input from the community, including physicians, and that regional boards be recruited through a clearly specified appointment or electoral process, - guidelines for use by communities to assess their health care needs and to provide assistance, as required, with the conduct of such assessments, - protocols and procedures for evaluating health system governance initiatives, - mechanisms to ensure adequate and appropriate physician input into operational aspects of regional planning and coordination of health care services, and - processes under any health system governance model ensure adequate opportunities for research, education (including continuing medical education) and training of physicians consistent with national standards.
Documents
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Operational principles for the measurement and management of wait lists (Update 2011)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10322
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2011-10-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2011-10-23
Replaces
Operational principles for the measurement and management of waiting lists
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Text
This policy statement provides operational principles for the measurement and management of wait list systems that support timely access to necessary care for patients. This statement is based on the understanding that in order for wait list systems to be effective in improving timely access to medically necessary care for patients, physicians and other providers must be centrally involved and appropriately supported to assist in their development, measurement and management. Since the late 1990s, Canadians have become increasingly concerned over lengthening wait times to access medically necessary care. As a result, a major focus of the 2004 Health Care Accord (10-Year Agreement to Strengthen Health Care) was to improve timely access to necessary medical care. Since then, provinces and territories have taken steps to measure, monitor and manage patient wait times. However, most efforts thus far to improve wait times have been focused on the wait between the specialist consultation and the scheduled date for treatment. Patients may also experience waits in accessing a family physician (many Canadians do not have a family physician) and waiting to see a specialist following a referral by a family physician. Canadians deserve timely access to medically necessary care. Governments must ensure that patients are treated within established wait-time benchmarks for all major diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical services. Physicians recognize that it is desirable to minimize waits and to properly prioritize and manage patients' wait for care by accurately capturing and utilizing wait-time data. However, there remain serious concerns over the quality of wait-time data and who has the primary responsibility for capturing the data. Physicians and other providers are increasingly being requested to input wait-time data (e.g., length of wait for consultation or for start of treatment). Yet, in many instances, they are expected to do so without the necessary resources and supports. Outlined below are Operational Principles for the Measurement and Management of Wait Lists developed originally through CMA's Access to Quality Health Care Project(1) with input from public opinion research as well as stakeholder groups, including CMA Core Committees, Provincial-Territorial Medical Associations and CMA Affiliates. Goals 1. To maintain or enhance patients' quality of life and health status through effective development, measurement and management of wait lists. 2. To ensure that the development, measurement and management of wait lists are based on the best available evidence of clinical appropriateness, clinical effectiveness, rational use of resources, clinical need and patient quality of life. Principles A. Stakeholder Involvement 1. Physicians in clinical practice must have a leadership role: - in identifying clinically relevant data elements through consensus; - in developing standard definitions and measures for prioritization for wait lists; and - in developing wait-time benchmarks. 2. Health care providers and other stakeholders should be involved in the development, measurement, maintenance, monitoring, management and evaluation of wait list systems, and should be appropriately compensated for their time and effort. B. Database Development and Management Systems 1. Systems for developing and managing wait lists must require and provide reliable, current, useful and valid data and information. 2. Database development and wait list management requires involvement of multidisciplinary panels. 3. Systems for managing wait lists should: - provide accurate, reliable, timely, publicly accessible and real-time information in a cost-effective manner. Deadlines for inputting data should be reasonable and implemented without the use of threats or penalties; - collect and assess data on need, quality of life and health outcomes; be flexible and dynamic so that they can adapt over time with the development of new technologies and approaches to treatment; and - require policies and procedures on confidentiality, so that patients' and providers' privacy are protected. C. Investment 1. Systems for managing wait lists require initial and sustained investment in dedicated human resources, sophisticated information systems and information technology infrastructure at all levels (e.g., medical offices, hospitals, health regions). D. Accountability 1. The parties involved in managing wait lists must accept their responsibilities and obligations to each other and to the public. 2. Privacy and confidentiality of patient and provider information must be respected. 3. The systems, processes and results for managing wait lists should be widely communicated to obtain stakeholder involvement and support. E. Evaluation 1. Systems for managing wait lists must: - be continually monitored and evaluated to identify opportunities for improvement; and - regularly undergo independent data audits and evaluations of process and outcome. F. Governance 1. An independent, stakeholder-based, non-governmental organization with an advisory committee should be responsible for overseeing and administering systems for managing wait lists. (1) Canadian Medical Association, Access to Quality Health Care Project, January 1998. Ottawa.
Documents
Less detail

Evaluation of clinical practice guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10448
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-21
The Canadian Medical Association calls for evidence-based evaluation of clinical practice guidelines in terms of patient outcomes, appropriateness and cost-effectiveness.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-21
The Canadian Medical Association calls for evidence-based evaluation of clinical practice guidelines in terms of patient outcomes, appropriateness and cost-effectiveness.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for evidence-based evaluation of clinical practice guidelines in terms of patient outcomes, appropriateness and cost-effectiveness.
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Registry of physician-managed health care transformation projects

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10462
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-29
The Canadian Medical Association will create a registry of physician-managed health care transformation projects.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-29
The Canadian Medical Association will create a registry of physician-managed health care transformation projects.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will create a registry of physician-managed health care transformation projects.
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Leadership training

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10466
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC12-37
The Canadian Medical Association will assess the leadership training physicians will find useful to become effective advocates for health care transformation.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC12-37
The Canadian Medical Association will assess the leadership training physicians will find useful to become effective advocates for health care transformation.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will assess the leadership training physicians will find useful to become effective advocates for health care transformation.
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Physician leadership

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10467
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-42
The Canadian Medical Association will examine physician leadership and engagement in system transformation across the country.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-42
The Canadian Medical Association will examine physician leadership and engagement in system transformation across the country.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will examine physician leadership and engagement in system transformation across the country.
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Best practices in physician leadership

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10468
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-43
The Canadian Medical Association will facilitate knowledge transfer of best practices in physician leadership and engagement across the country.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-43
The Canadian Medical Association will facilitate knowledge transfer of best practices in physician leadership and engagement across the country.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will facilitate knowledge transfer of best practices in physician leadership and engagement across the country.
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Formal mentoring programs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10469
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-58
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-58
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
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Multiple chronic diseases

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10470
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-56
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a curriculum to educate physicians and trainees in managing patients with multiple chronic diseases.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC12-56
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a curriculum to educate physicians and trainees in managing patients with multiple chronic diseases.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a curriculum to educate physicians and trainees in managing patients with multiple chronic diseases.
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Physicians' self-assessment

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10488
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-34
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a physician-created, owned and managed infrastructure to facilitate Canadian physicians' objective self-assessment.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-34
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a physician-created, owned and managed infrastructure to facilitate Canadian physicians' objective self-assessment.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of a physician-created, owned and managed infrastructure to facilitate Canadian physicians' objective self-assessment.
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38 records – page 1 of 4.