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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


24 records – page 1 of 3.

CMA's Presentation to the Senate Standing Committee on National Finance: Bill C-9, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 4, 2010 and other measures

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9833
Date
2010-06-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2010-06-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Text
Thank you Madame Chair and Committee members for the opportunity to speak to you today. As mentioned, I am Briane Scharfstein, Associate Secretary General at the Canadian Medical Association (CMA). I am a family physician by training and a member of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Medical Isotopes. The working group was created to advise the Minister of Health in 2008 when the first major sustained shutdown of the Chalk River occurred. When I agreed to join the group, I certainly didn't expect it to still be going over two years later. And, while I am a member of the working group, I want to be clear, that today I am speaking on behalf of the CMA and our more than 72,000 physician members across the country. My comments are a reflection of the Working Group's June 2008 Lessons Learned report and I regret to say that a good portion of our observations are still true today. I congratulate the Senate for looking specifically at the AECL proposals and for looking at implications for patients. While the CMA is not taking a specific position on the proposal in Bill C-9 for Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL), in whole or in part, to be sold off to the private sector, we do believe that it is in the best interests of our patients that Canada remains a leader in the sector. As well, Canada's doctors strongly believe that the impact on individual patient care must be considered and factored into any decisions that might result in disruptions of the supply of medical isotopes. The CMA acknowledges that the federal budget did include $48 million over two years for research, development and application of medical isotopes and alternatives. Further, there was another allocation of $300 million on a cash basis for AECL's operations in 2010/11 to cover anticipated commercial losses and support the corporation's operations to ensuring a secure supply of medical isotopes and maintaining safe and reliable operations at the Chalk River Laboratory. However, the CMA remains preoccupied with Canada's ability to ensure a long-term, stable and predictable supply of medically necessary isotopes. That is why we are uneasy about the federal government's exit strategy from the isotope production sector. The report of the federal government's Expert Panel on the Production of Medical Isotopes, (December 2009) and the federal government's response to that report, (March 2010) appears to focus on the viability of this specific sector of the nuclear industry and has not alleviated our concerns. The government's response to the Panel Report was disappointing to the medical community. The government's decision to abandon Canada's long-standing international leadership in this sector is disheartening. Of particular concern is the absence of both immediate and medium-term solutions to address the current and impending challenges facing nuclear medicine. This is simply unacceptable. The CMA, along with our colleagues in the medical community, continues to assert that ensuring access to safe and reliable medical procedures and the provision of high-quality patient care must be the fundamental consideration of government decisions. While the production cost of isotopes cannot be ignored, particularly in times of global fiscal challenges, the medical application and benefits received are of paramount importance and must be neither discounted nor dismissed. Early diagnosis and treatment are key factors in successful outcomes in cardiac and cancer cases. Without early diagnosis and treatment, patients have an increased risk of needing greater medical intervention later on. With more intensive treatment comes a corresponding increase in costs to the health care system and, most importantly, poorer outcomes for patients. Specific concerns identified by the CMA and the medical community include, but are not limited to the following: * Canada's current dependence on international reactors, without a practical back-up plan should these reactors experience difficulties, or shutdown for routine maintenance. This is especially worrisome as the international agency, the Association of Imaging Producers & Equipment Suppliers (AIPES) warns of the unprecedented level of shortages, in a large part due to the Canada's Chalk River nuclear reactor remaining off line until August 2010 or beyond. In a recent Supply Crisis Update, AIPES points out that with a number of international reactors off-line for scheduled maintenance, the remaining reactors -the OPAL (Australia), Maria (Poland) and REZ (Czech Republic) reactors-are producing Mo99, but their combined output is limited to 15 - 20 % of the world requirements. * The abandonment of Canada's international responsibilities and world leadership in this sector is counter to the government's own innovation and productivity agenda. * A growing reliance on emerging technology, cyclotrons and liner accelerators that have yet to be proven as a suitable secure alternative source of radiopharmaceutical. * A projected future supply chain that is reliant on external sources, rather than domestic production, in times of domestic supply shortages. As well, we are concerned that the federal government is leaving it to the marketplace, solely relying on current distributors to identify external sources supply, rather than searching to identify alternative safe sources of supply. * Basing Canada's supply strategy on relicensing of the Chalk River reactor five years past its current license with no current guarantees that the plant will return and remain in production, let alone meet relicensing standards. * The apparent lack of a federal contingency plan if, in 2016, alternative sources of supply and alternative emerging technology does not meet clinical needs. * An analysis of the overall costs to the health care system as a result of the increased costs incurred during the prolonged period of shortages of isotopes supply and the rising costs as the demand for the alternative diagnostic and treatment models is not apparent. * Initiatives to help mitigate increased costs for governments and particularly for nuclear medicine facilities do not exist. The just released survey by the Canadian Institute for Health Information found that two-thirds of nuclear medicine facilities reported that they experienced an increase in the cost of isotopes and that they were managing but exceeding their budget due to vendor surcharges. Only 2% reported that the isotope supply disruptions had no economic impact. Canada's medical community therefore strongly urges that consideration be given to: * investing in a mixed-use reactor for research and isotope production, as per the recommendation of the Expert Panel on Isotopes Production report of December, 2009; * putting in place appropriate strategies and contingency plans to meet the health needs of Canadians; in particular consider a national deployment of PET technology for cancer detection and follow up. * enhancing transparency by the government that provides more information on the short and medium-tern detailed plans to address isotope shortages; * increasing the direct consultation with the official representatives of the nuclear medicine and medical community; * making a public commitment to keep the Chalk River NRU reactor operational beyond the arbitrary date of 2016, as long as necessary and until secure alternative supplies of isotopes or alternative radiopharmaceuticals are proven and are in place; and, * ensuring that the CNSC resurrects the external medical advisory council to facilitate communication between the medical community and the commission. Prior to 2001, members of the council provided CNSC staff with insight into how operational and policy decisions would affect patient care across the country. Canada's doctors believe that the federal government must maintain a leadership role in this sector and must not compromise the medical needs of Canadians.
Documents
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Patient-focused funding

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9843
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-11
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and governments to ensure that patient-focused funding initiatives are based on data that are scientifically valid, accurate and publicly available.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-11
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and governments to ensure that patient-focused funding initiatives are based on data that are scientifically valid, accurate and publicly available.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and governments to ensure that patient-focused funding initiatives are based on data that are scientifically valid, accurate and publicly available.
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Collaborative development of patient-focused funding initiatives

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9844
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-12
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to ensure meaningful consultations by governments with physicians who are accountable to the medical profession in the collaborative development of patient-focused funding initiatives.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-12
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to ensure meaningful consultations by governments with physicians who are accountable to the medical profession in the collaborative development of patient-focused funding initiatives.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations to ensure meaningful consultations by governments with physicians who are accountable to the medical profession in the collaborative development of patient-focused funding initiatives.
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Patient-focused funding

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9845
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-13
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and governments to ensure that patient-focused funding supports the timeliness, safety and quality of patient care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-13
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and governments to ensure that patient-focused funding supports the timeliness, safety and quality of patient care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and governments to ensure that patient-focused funding supports the timeliness, safety and quality of patient care.
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Lifetime clinical prevention schedule

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9855
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC10-24
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, urges governments to support the development and implementation of a lifetime clinical prevention schedule based on scientific evidence and coordinated by primary care physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC10-24
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, urges governments to support the development and implementation of a lifetime clinical prevention schedule based on scientific evidence and coordinated by primary care physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, urges governments to support the development and implementation of a lifetime clinical prevention schedule based on scientific evidence and coordinated by primary care physicians.
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Multidisciplinary care initiatives

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9863
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC10-33
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of multidisciplinary care initiatives that incorporate long-term, sustainable funding and resources that remove financial barriers to incorporating diverse allied health professionals within medical practices.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Resolution
GC10-33
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of multidisciplinary care initiatives that incorporate long-term, sustainable funding and resources that remove financial barriers to incorporating diverse allied health professionals within medical practices.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of multidisciplinary care initiatives that incorporate long-term, sustainable funding and resources that remove financial barriers to incorporating diverse allied health professionals within medical practices.
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Principles of the Canada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9864
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-34
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to re-interpret the principles of the Canada Health Act in light of the evolution in the delivery of health care services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-34
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to re-interpret the principles of the Canada Health Act in light of the evolution in the delivery of health care services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to re-interpret the principles of the Canada Health Act in light of the evolution in the delivery of health care services.
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Renegotiation of the 2004 First Ministers’ Health Accord

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9865
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-36
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to begin discussions with provincial and territorial governments, in consultation with health care stakeholders, on the renegotiation of the 2004 First Ministers’ Health Accord that is set to expire March 31, 2014.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-36
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to begin discussions with provincial and territorial governments, in consultation with health care stakeholders, on the renegotiation of the 2004 First Ministers’ Health Accord that is set to expire March 31, 2014.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to begin discussions with provincial and territorial governments, in consultation with health care stakeholders, on the renegotiation of the 2004 First Ministers’ Health Accord that is set to expire March 31, 2014.
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Data on physician human resources

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9868
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-35
The Canadian Medical Association will work with governments, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliate and associate organizations, and other stakeholders to regularly analyse data on physician human resources in the context of changing information.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-35
The Canadian Medical Association will work with governments, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliate and associate organizations, and other stakeholders to regularly analyse data on physician human resources in the context of changing information.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with governments, provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliate and associate organizations, and other stakeholders to regularly analyse data on physician human resources in the context of changing information.
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Pharmaceutical and medical device purchase agreements

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9874
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-44
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, calls on governments to disclose pricing details in negotiated pharmaceutical and medical device purchase agreements.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2010-08-25
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC10-44
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, calls on governments to disclose pricing details in negotiated pharmaceutical and medical device purchase agreements.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, calls on governments to disclose pricing details in negotiated pharmaceutical and medical device purchase agreements.
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24 records – page 1 of 3.