Results

12 records – page 1 of 2.

Canada Health Infoway

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8924

Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC07-110
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on Canada Health Infoway to support physicians in developing electronic medical records and linkages to electronic health records by making funding directly available to physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC07-110
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on Canada Health Infoway to support physicians in developing electronic medical records and linkages to electronic health records by making funding directly available to physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates call on Canada Health Infoway to support physicians in developing electronic medical records and linkages to electronic health records by making funding directly available to physicians.
Less detail

Environmental factors and health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8934

Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-70
The Canadian Medical Association will enhance its work on the issues related to health and the environment by: a. highlighting the work of physicians who participate actively in national and international activities associated with improving the environment; b. advocating for programs to prevent or reduce the human and environmental health impact from global climate change and environmental degradation; c. lobbying policy decision-makers to incorporate concerns for human health into current environmental research and all public policy initiatives and; d. strengthening its relationships with appropriate environmental health agencies, such as Environment Canada and the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-70
The Canadian Medical Association will enhance its work on the issues related to health and the environment by: a. highlighting the work of physicians who participate actively in national and international activities associated with improving the environment; b. advocating for programs to prevent or reduce the human and environmental health impact from global climate change and environmental degradation; c. lobbying policy decision-makers to incorporate concerns for human health into current environmental research and all public policy initiatives and; d. strengthening its relationships with appropriate environmental health agencies, such as Environment Canada and the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will enhance its work on the issues related to health and the environment by: a. highlighting the work of physicians who participate actively in national and international activities associated with improving the environment; b. advocating for programs to prevent or reduce the human and environmental health impact from global climate change and environmental degradation; c. lobbying policy decision-makers to incorporate concerns for human health into current environmental research and all public policy initiatives and; d. strengthening its relationships with appropriate environmental health agencies, such as Environment Canada and the National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy.
Less detail

Environmental stewardship

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8936

Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-74
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-74
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will respond to the challenge for a clean environment (air, water, soil, climate change) by encouraging: a. physicians to become spokespersons for environmental stewardship, including the discussion of these issues when appropriate with patients; b. the medical community to work with health care facilities to adopt and implement policies aimed at reducing or recycling waste in a safe and properly prescribed manner; c. physicians to adopt "green" measures in their practice environments and personal lifestyles; d. medical schools, residency programs and continuing medical education sessions to enhance their provision of educational programs on health and the environment; and e. the development of evidence-based information on health and environment issues.
Less detail
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-84
The Canadian Medical Association will study the "gap in generalism" and collaborate with other stakeholders to identify proactive measures that will help to fill the gap and enable generalists to thrive in our health care system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-84
The Canadian Medical Association will study the "gap in generalism" and collaborate with other stakeholders to identify proactive measures that will help to fill the gap and enable generalists to thrive in our health care system.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will study the "gap in generalism" and collaborate with other stakeholders to identify proactive measures that will help to fill the gap and enable generalists to thrive in our health care system.
Less detail

National rural health strategy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8991

Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-208
The Canadian Medical Association will take the lead with other national medical organizations to advocate for the development of a national rural health strategy.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-208
The Canadian Medical Association will take the lead with other national medical organizations to advocate for the development of a national rural health strategy.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will take the lead with other national medical organizations to advocate for the development of a national rural health strategy.
Less detail

Notes for an address by Dr. Peter Barrett, Past-President, Canadian Medical Association : Public hearings on primary care reform : Presentation to the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy2011

Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2002-05-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2002-05-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Text
On behalf of the 53,000 physician members of the CMA, we appreciate the opportunity to offer our thoughts on the issue of primary care reform and the recommendations made recently in your April 2002 report. I am very pleased to be presenting today with my CMA colleague, Dr. Susan Hutchison, Chair of our GP Forum along with Dr. Elliot Halparin and Dr. Kenneth Sky from the Ontario Medical Association. Before I begin presenting the CMA’s recommendations, I believe it’s important to make a few points clear in regard to primary care: * First, is that Canada has one of the best primary care systems in the world. (Just ask Canadians, we have. Our 2001 Report Card showed that 60% of Canadians believe that we have one of the best health care systems in the world and gave high marks for both quality of service and system access). * Second, is that primary care reform is not the panacea for all that ails Medicare. * And finally, primary care and specialty care are inextricably linked. I like to expand a bit on the last point because I think it’s an important consideration. There is a tendency to separate medical care into two areas; primary care and specialty care. However, we need to recognize that medical and health care encompasses a broad spectrum of services ranging from primary prevention to highly specialized quaternary care. Primary care and specialty care are so critically interdependent that we need to adapt an integrated approach to patient care. Now, in respect to the CMA’s recommendations on implementing changes for the delivery of primary care, we believe that government must respect the following four policy premises: 1. All Canadians should have access to a family physician. 2. To ensure comprehensive and integrated care, family physicians should remain as the central provider and coordinator of timely access to publicly-funded medical services. 3. There is no single model that will meet the primary care needs of all communities in all regions of the country. 4. Scopes of practice should be determined in a manner that serves the interests of patients and the public safely, efficiently, and competently. Access to Family Physicians A successful renewal of primary health care delivery cannot be accomplished without addressing the shortage of family physicians and general practitioners. The effects of an aging practitioners population, changes in lifestyle and productivity, along with the declining popularity of this field as the career choice of medical school graduates are all having an impact on the supply of family physician. Physician as Central Coordinator While multistakeholder teams offer the potential for providing a broader array of services to meet patients’ health care needs, it is also clear that for most Canadians, having a family doctor as the central provider for all primary medical care services is a core value. As the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) indicated in its submission to the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada, research shows that over 90% of Canadians seek advice from a family physician as their first resource in the health care system. The CFPC also noted that a recent Ontario College of Family Physicians Decima public opinion survey found that 94% agree that it is important to have a family physician who provides the majority of care and co-ordinates the care delivered by others. i A family physician as the central coordinator of medical services ensures efficient and effective use of system resources as it allows for only one entry point into the health care system. This facilitates a continuity of care, as the family physician generally has developed an ongoing relationship with his or her patients and as a result is able to direct the patient through the system such that the patient receives the appropriate care from the appropriate provider. No Single Model for Reform In recent years, several government task force and commission reports, including the report of this Committee, have called for primary care reform. Common themes that have emerged include; 24/7 coverage; alternatives to fee-for-service payment of physicians; nurse practitioners and health promotion and disease prevention. Governments across the country have launched pilot projects of various models of primary care delivery. It is critical that these projects are evaluated before they are adopted on a grander scale. Moreover, we must take into account the range of geographical settings across the country, from isolated rural communities to the highly urbanized communities with advanced medical science centres. Scopes of Practice There is a prevailing myth that physicians are a barrier to change when in fact the progressive changes in the health care system have been more often than not physician lead. Canadian physicians are willing to work in teams and the CMA has developed a “Scopes of Practice” policy that clearly supports a collaborative and cooperative approach. A policy that has been supported in principle by the Canadian Nurses Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association. Because of the growing complexity of care, the exponential growth of knowledge, and an increased emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention, primary care delivery will increasingly rely on multi-stakeholder teams. This is a positive development. However, expanding the primary care team to include nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, and others, while desirable, will cost the system more, not less. Therefore, we need to change our way of thinking about primary care reform. We need to think of it as an investment. We need to think of it not in terms of cost savings but as a cost-effective way to meet the emerging unmet needs of Canadians. Conclusion To conclude, there is no question that primary care delivery needs to evolve to ensure it continues to meet the needs of Canadians. But we see this as making a good system better, not fundamental reform. Thank you. i College of Family Physicians of Canada. Shaping The Future of Health Care: Submission to the Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada. Ottawa: CFPC; Oct 25, 2001.

Documents

Less detail

Patient-focused Funding (PFF)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9000

Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Less detail

Physician assistants

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8882

Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-40
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates to develop a plan to enable the further expansion and integration of physician assistants into civilian health care in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC07-40
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates to develop a plan to enable the further expansion and integration of physician assistants into civilian health care in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations and affiliates to develop a plan to enable the further expansion and integration of physician assistants into civilian health care in Canada.
Less detail

Physicians and health policy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy82

Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-117
That Canadian Medical Association, divisions and affiliates urge governments to meet regularly with physicians in leadership roles and other health professionals when developing implementation plans for the recommendations of federal, provincial and territorial commission and task force reports pertaining to health policy.
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2002-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC02-117
That Canadian Medical Association, divisions and affiliates urge governments to meet regularly with physicians in leadership roles and other health professionals when developing implementation plans for the recommendations of federal, provincial and territorial commission and task force reports pertaining to health policy.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association, divisions and affiliates urge governments to meet regularly with physicians in leadership roles and other health professionals when developing implementation plans for the recommendations of federal, provincial and territorial commission and task force reports pertaining to health policy.

Documents

Less detail

Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance -December 7, 2007

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9057

Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
It is a pleasure to address the Standing Committee on Finance today as part of your pre-budget consultations. In keeping with the theme set by the Committee, our presentation - Tax Incentives for Better Living - focuses on changing the tax system to better support the health and well being of all Canadians. Today I will share with you three recommendations improving the health of Canadians and productivity of the Canadian economy: First, tax incentives for pre-paid long-term care insurance; Second, tax incentives to retain and recruit more doctors and nurses; Third, tax incentives to enhance health system productivity and quality improvements. 1. Long Term Care insurance Canada's population is ageing fast. Yet, long-term care has received little policy attention in Canada. Unlike other countries like the UK and Germany who have systems in place, Canada is not prepared to address these looming challenges. The first of the baby-boomers will turn 65 in 2011. By 2031, seniors will comprise one quarter of the population - double the current proportion of 13%. The second challenge is the lack of health service labour force that will be able to care for this ageing population. Long-term care cannot and should not be financed on the same pay-as-you-go basis as medical/hospital insurance. Therefore the CMA urges the Committee to consider either tax-pre-paid or tax-deferred options for funding long-term care. These options are examined in full in the package we have supplied you with today. 2. Improving access to quality care Canada's physician shortage is a critical issue. Here in Quebec, 1 in 4 people do not have access to a family physician. Overall 3.5 people in Canada do not have a family Physician. Despite this dire shortage, the Canada Student Loans program creates barriers to the training of more physicians. Medical students routinely begin their postgraduate training with debts of over $120,000. Although still in training, they must begin paying back their medical school loans as they complete their graduate training. This policy affects both the kind of specialty that physicians-in-training choose, and ultimately where they decide to practice. We urge this Committee to recommend the extension of interest-free status on Canada Student Loans for all eligible health professional students pursuing postgraduate training. 3. Health System IT: increasing productivity and quality of care The last issue I will address is health system automation. Investment in information technology will lead to better, safer and cheaper patient care. In spite of the recent $400 million transfer to Canada Health Infoway, Canada still ranks at the bottom of the G8 countries in access to health information technologies. We spend just one-third of the OECD average on IT in our hospitals. This is a significant factor with respect to our poor record in avoidable adverse health effects. An Electronic Health Record (EHR) could provide annual, system-wide savings of $6.1 billion - every year - and reduce wait times and thereby absenteeism. But, the EHR potential can only be realized if physician's offices across Canada are fully automated. The federal government could invest directly in physician office automation by introducing dedicated tax credits or by accelerating the capital cost allowance related to health information technologies for patients. Before I conclude, the CMA again urges the Committee to address a long-standing tax issue that costs physicians and the health care system over $65 million a year. When you add hospitals - that cost more than doubles to over $145 million-or the equivalent of 60 MRI machines a year. The application of the GST on physicians is a consumption tax on a producer of vital services and affects the ability of physicians to provide care to their patients. And now with the emphasis on further sales tax harmonization, the problem will be compounded. Nearly 20 years ago when the GST was put into place, physician office expenses were relatively low for example: tongue depressors, bandages and small things. There was practically no use computers or information technology. How many of you used computers 20 years ago? Now Canadian physicians' could be and should be using 21st century equipment that is expensive but powerful. This powerful diagnostic equipment can save lives and save the system millions of dollars in the long run. It provides a clear return on investment. Yet, physicians still have to pay the GST (and the PST) on diagnostic equipment that costs a minimum of $500,000 that's an extra $30,000 that physicians must pay. The result of this misalignment of tax policy and health policy is that most Radiologists' diagnostic imaging equipment is over 30-years old. Canadians deserve better. It's time for the federal government to stop taxing health care. We urge the Committee to recommend the "zero-rating" publicly funded health services or to provide one-hundred percent tax rebates to physicians and hospitals. Conclusion In conclusion, we trust the Committee recognizes the benefits of aligning tax policy with health policy in order to create the right incentives for citizens to realize their potential. By supporting: 1. Tax Incentives for Long-Term Care 2. Tax Incentives to Bolster Health Human Resources and, 3. Tax Incentives to Support Health System Automation. This committee can respond to immediate access to health care pressures that Canadians are facing. Delaying a response to these pressures will have an impact on the competiveness of our economy now, and with compounding effects in the future. I appreciate the opportunity of entering into a dialogue with members of the Committee and look forward to your questions. Thank you.

Documents

Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.