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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


31 records – page 1 of 4.

Access to public long-term care homes

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11906
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-35
The Canadian Medical Association will raise the federal government’s awareness of the inequitable access to public long-term care homes that is experienced by patients with financial, cultural and/or linguistic barriers.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-35
The Canadian Medical Association will raise the federal government’s awareness of the inequitable access to public long-term care homes that is experienced by patients with financial, cultural and/or linguistic barriers.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will raise the federal government’s awareness of the inequitable access to public long-term care homes that is experienced by patients with financial, cultural and/or linguistic barriers.
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An Act providing for the development of a framework on palliative care in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11928
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-54
The Canadian Medical Association supports Bill C-277, An Act providing for the development of a framework on palliative care in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC16-54
The Canadian Medical Association supports Bill C-277, An Act providing for the development of a framework on palliative care in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports Bill C-277, An Act providing for the development of a framework on palliative care in Canada.
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Contingency plans to respond to emergencies or disasters

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11913
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC16-42
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of practice contingency plans to respond to emergencies or disasters that disrupt primary care service delivery.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC16-42
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of practice contingency plans to respond to emergencies or disasters that disrupt primary care service delivery.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the development of practice contingency plans to respond to emergencies or disasters that disrupt primary care service delivery.
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Cost of neuropsychological assessments

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11912
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC16-55
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of the cost of neuropsychological assessments of all patients suspected of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder as an insured-benefit.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC16-55
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of the cost of neuropsychological assessments of all patients suspected of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder as an insured-benefit.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports inclusion of the cost of neuropsychological assessments of all patients suspected of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder as an insured-benefit.
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Courses on health system operations and financing

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10164
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-26
The Canadian Medical Association requests the faculties of medicine to include courses on health system operations and financing in the curricula.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-26
The Canadian Medical Association requests the faculties of medicine to include courses on health system operations and financing in the curricula.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association requests the faculties of medicine to include courses on health system operations and financing in the curricula.
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Emergency health services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11914
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC16-43
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports initiatives to enhance the capacity of primary care physicians to provide emergency health services during and after disasters.
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Funding criteria for any new electronic medical record initiative

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11925
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC16-50
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that funding criteria for any new electronic medical record initiative include the ability for patients to access and contribute to their record.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2016-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health information and e-health
Resolution
GC16-50
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that funding criteria for any new electronic medical record initiative include the ability for patients to access and contribute to their record.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that funding criteria for any new electronic medical record initiative include the ability for patients to access and contribute to their record.
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Health administration programs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10203
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the integration of clinical observation and epidemiology training into health administration programs.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC11-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the integration of clinical observation and epidemiology training into health administration programs.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the integration of clinical observation and epidemiology training into health administration programs.
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Health system input/outcome methodologies

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy707
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1982-09-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC82-49
That the Canadian Medical Association develop methodologies to study the relationship between inputs (dollars spent) and the measured outcome of the system (qualitative and quantitative improvements in a population's health status) and work with other agencies to aid the development of this methodology.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1982-09-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC82-49
That the Canadian Medical Association develop methodologies to study the relationship between inputs (dollars spent) and the measured outcome of the system (qualitative and quantitative improvements in a population's health status) and work with other agencies to aid the development of this methodology.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association develop methodologies to study the relationship between inputs (dollars spent) and the measured outcome of the system (qualitative and quantitative improvements in a population's health status) and work with other agencies to aid the development of this methodology.
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A Healthy Population for a Stronger Economy: CMA pre-budget consultation submission to the Standing Committee on Finance

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10224
Date
2011-08-12
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2011-08-12
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance examines how increasing retirement income saving options, improving access to prescription drugs, and planning for a Canadian Health Quality Alliance to promote innovation in the delivery of high quality health care can enhance our health care system and, in turn, make our economy more productive. Higher quality health care and expanded options for meeting the needs of retired and elderly Canadians will contribute to the ultimate goals of better patient care, improved population health and help our country reach its full potential. Polls show that Canadians are becoming increasingly concerned about the future of their health care system, particularly in terms of their ability to access essential care. The CMA's 2011 pre-budget submission responds to these concerns and supports a healthy population, a healthy medical profession and a healthy economic recovery. Our recommendations are as follows: Recommendation # 1 The federal government should study options to expand the current PRPP definition beyond defined contribution pension plans. Also, the federal government should expand the definition of eligible administrators of PRPPs beyond financial institutions to include organizations such as professional associations. Recommendation # 2 Governments, in consultation with the life and health insurance industry and the public, should establish a program of comprehensive prescription drug coverage to be administered through reimbursement of provincial/territorial and private prescription drug plans to ensure that all Canadians have access to medically necessary drug therapies. Recommendation # 3 The federal government should convene a time-limited national steering committee that would engage key stakeholders in developing a proposal for a pan-Canadian Health Quality Alliance with a mandate to work collaboratively towards integrated approaches for a sustainable health care system through innovative practices in the delivery of high quality health care. Introduction Over the past year, the CMA has engaged Canadians across the country in a broad-based public consultation on health care and heard about their concerns and experiences with the system. This exercise was undertaken as part of the CMA's Health Care Transformation (HCT) initiative, a roadmap for modernizing Canada's health care systemi so that it puts patients first and provides Canadians with better value for money. We have heard through these consultations that Canadians do not believe they are currently getting good value from their health care system, a feeling borne out by studies comparing Canada's health care system to those in leading countries in Europe. We also heard that Canadians are concerned about inequities in access to care beyond the basic medicare basket, particularly in the area of access to prescription drugs. While all levels of government need to be involved, it is the federal government that must lead the transformation of our most cherished social program. 1. Retirement Income Improvement Issue: Increasing retirement savings options for Canadians with a focus on improving their ability to look after their long-term care needs. Background The CMA remains concerned about the status of Canada's retirement income system and the future ability of Canada's seniors to adequately fund their long-term and supportive care needs. The proportion of Canadian seniors (65+) is expected to almost double from its present level of 13% to almost 25% by 2036. Statistics Canada projections show that between 2015 and 2021 the number of seniors will, for the first time, surpass the number of children under 14 years of age.ii The CMA has been working proactively on this issue in several ways, including through the recently created Retirement Income Improvement Coalition (RIIC), a broad-based coalition of 11 organizations representing over one million self-employed professionals. The coalition has previously recommended to the federal government the following actions: * increased retirement saving options for all Canadians, particularly the self-employed; * changes to the Income Tax Act, Income Tax Regulations and the Employment Standards Act to enable the self-employed to participate in pension plans; * the approval of Pooled Retirement Pension Plans (PRPP) as a retirement savings program for the self-employed; * changes to the current tax-deferred income saving options (increase the percentage of earned income or the maximum-dollar amount contribution limit for RRSPs); * a requirement that registration to all retirement saving options be voluntary (optional); and * opportunities for Canadians to become better educated about retirement saving options (financial literacy).iii The CMA appreciates that federal, provincial and territorial finance ministers are moving ahead with the introduction of Pooled Registered Retirement Plans (PRPPs). The CMA, as part of the RIIC, has been providing input into the consultation process. However, PRPPs represent only one piece of a more comprehensive retirement savings structure. Recommendation # 1 The federal government should study options that would not limit PRPPs to defined contribution pension plans. Target benefit plans should be permitted and encouraged. Target benefit plans allow risk to be pooled among the plan members, providing a more secure vehicle than defined contribution plans. Also, the administrators of PRPPs should not be limited to financial institutions. Well-governed organizations that represent a particular membership should be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. The CMA also continues to be concerned about the ability of Canadians to save for their long-term health care needs. The Wait Time Alliance - a coalition of 14 national medical organizations whose members provide specialty care to patients - reported recently that many patients, particularly the elderly, are in hospital while waiting for more suitable and appropriate care arrangements. Mostly in need of support rather than medical care, these patients are hindered by the lack of options available to them, often due to limited personal income. The CMA has previously recommended that the federal government should study options for pre-funding long-term care, including private insurance, tax-deferred and tax-prepaid savings approaches, and contribution-based social insurance. This remains pertinent. 2. Universal access to prescription drugs Issue: Ensuring all Canadians have access to a basic level of prescription drugs. Background Universal access to prescription drugs is widely acknowledged as part of the "unfinished business" of medicare in Canada. In 1964 the Hall Commission recommended that the federal government contribute 50% of the cost of a Prescription Drug Benefit within the Health Services Program. It also recommended a $1.00 contributory payment by the purchaser for each prescription. This has never been implemented.iv What has emerged since then is a public-private mix of funding for prescription drugs. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) has estimated that, as of 2010, 46% of prescription drug expenditures were public, 36% were paid for by private insurance and 18% were paid for out-of-pocket.v Nationally there is evidence of wide variability in levels of drug coverage. According to Statistics Canada, 3% of households spent greater than 5% of after-tax income on prescription drugs in 2008. Across provinces this ranged from 2.2% in Ontario and Alberta, to 5.8% in P.E.I. and 5.9% in Saskatchewan.vi Moreover, there is significant variation between the coverage levels of the various provincial plans across Canada. For example, the Manitoba Pharmacare Program is based on total income, with adjustment for spouse and dependents under 18, while in Newfoundland and Labrador, the plan is based on net family income.vii,viii The Commonwealth Fund's 2010 International Health Policy Survey found that 10% of Canadian respondents said they had either not filled a prescription or skipped doses because of cost issues.ix Moreover, there have been numerous media stories about inequities in access across provinces to cancer drugs and expensive drugs for rare diseases. The high cost of prescription drugs was frequently raised during our public consultations this year. The need for a national drug strategy or pharmacare plan was mentioned by an overwhelming number of respondents, many of whom detailed how they had been affected by the high cost of drugs. The cost to the federal government of a program that would ensure universal access to prescription drugs would depend on the threshold of out-of-pocket contribution and the proportion of expenses that it would be willing to share with private and provincial/territorial public plans. Estimates have ranged from $500 millionx, and $1 billionxi, to the most recent estimate from the provincial-territorial health ministers of $2.5 billion (2006).xii Recommendation # 2 Governments, in consultation with the life and health insurance industry and the public, should establish a program of comprehensive prescription drug coverage to be administered through reimbursement of provincial/territorial and private prescription drug plans to ensure that all Canadians have access to medically necessary drug therapies. Such a program should include: * a mandate for all Canadians to have either private or public coverage for prescription drugs; * a uniform income-based ceiling (between public and private plans and across provinces/territories) on out-of-pocket expenditures, on drug plan premiums and/or prescription drugs; * federal/provincial/territorial cost-sharing of prescription drug expenditures above a household income ceiling, subject to capping the total federal and/or provincial/territorial contributions either by adjusting the federal/provincial/territorial sharing of reimbursement or by scaling the household income ceiling or both; * a requirement for group insurance plans and administrators of employee benefit plans to pool risk above a threshold linked to group size; and * a continued strong role for private supplementary insurance plans and public drug plans on a level playing field (i.e., premiums and co-payments to cover plan costs). 3. Innovation for Quality in Canadian Health Care Issue: Development of a proposal to establish a Canadian Health Quality Alliance to promote innovation in the delivery of high-quality health care in Canada. Background There is general agreement that Canada's health care system is no longer a strong performer compared to similar nations. Clearly, we can do better. However, progress has been slow on a comprehensive quality agenda for our health care system. At the national level, there is no coordination or body with a mandate to promote a comprehensive approach to quality improvement. Over the past two decades, health care stakeholders in Canada have gradually come to embrace a multi-dimensional concept of quality in health care encompassing safety, appropriateness, effectiveness, accessibility, competency and efficiency. The unilateral federal funding cuts to health transfers that took effect in 1996 precipitated a long preoccupation with the accessibility dimension that was finally acknowledged with the Wait Time Reduction Fund in the 2004 First Ministers Accord. The safety dimension was recognized with the establishment of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) in 2003. Competence has been recognized by health professional organizations and regulatory bodies through the development of peer-review programs and mandated career-long professional development. While six provinces have established some form of health quality council (B.C., Alta., Sask., Ont., Que., N.B.), there is no national approach to quality improvement beyond safety. Given that health care stands as Canadians' top national priority and that it represents a very large expenditure item for all levels of government, the lack of a national approach to quality improvement is a major shortcoming. In the U.S., the Institute for Healthcare Improvement is dedicated to developing and promulgating methods and processes for improving the delivery of care throughout the world.xiii England's National Health Service (NHS) has also created focal points over the past decade to accelerate innovation and improvement throughout their health system. Canadian advancements in the health field have occurred when the expertise and perspective of a range of stakeholders have come together. The CPSI, for example, was established following the deliberations and report of the National Steering Committee on Patient Safety.xiv It is estimated that it would cost less than $500,000 for a multi-stakeholder committee to develop a proposal for a national alliance for quality improvement, including the cost of any commissioned research. Recommendation # 3 The federal government should convene a time-limited national steering committee that would engage key stakeholders in developing a proposal for a pan-Canadian Health Quality Alliance with a mandate to work collaboratively towards integrated approaches for a sustainable health care system through innovative practices in the delivery of high quality health care. This alliance would be expected to achieve the following in order to modernize health care services: * Promote a comprehensive approach to quality improvement in health care; * Promote pan-Canadian sharing of innovative and best practices; * Develop and disseminate methods of engaging frontline clinicians in quality improvement processes; and * Establish international partnerships for the exchange of innovative practices. Such an alliance could be established in a variety of ways: * Virtually, using the Networks of Centres of Excellencexv approach; * By expanding the mandate of an existing body; or * Through the creation of a new body. REFERENCES i Canadian Medical Association. Health Care Transformation in Canada. Change that Works. Care that Lasts. http://www.cma.ca/multimedia/CMA/Content_Images/Inside_cma/Advocacy/HCT/HCT-2010report_en.pdf Accessed 13/07/11. ii Statistics Canada. Population Projections for Canada, Provinces and Territories. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-520-x/2010001/aftertoc-aprestdm1-eng.htm. Accessed 13/07/11. iii Retirement Income Improvement Coalition. Letter to the federal Minister of Finance and the Minister of State (Finance). March 17, 2011. ivHall, E. Royal Commission on Health Services. Volume 1. Ottawa: Queen's Printer, 1964. vCanadian Institute for Health Information. Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2010. Ottawa, 2010. viStatistics Canada. CANSIM Table 109-5012 Household spending on prescription drugs as a percentage of after-tax income, Canada and provinces, annual (percent). http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/pick-choisir?lang=eng&searchTypeByValue=1&id=1095012. Accessed 05/29/11. vii Manitoba Health. Pharmacare deductible estimator. http://www.gov.mb.ca/health/pharmacare/estimator.html. Accessed 07/28/11. viii Newfoundland Department of Health and Community Services. Newfoundland and Labrador Prescription Drug Program (NLPDP). http://www.health.gov.nl.ca/health/prescription/nlpdp_application_form.pdf. Accessed 07/29/11. ixCommonwealth Fund. International health policy survey in eleven countries. http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/Files/Publications/Chartbook/2010/PDF_2010_IHP_Survey_Chartpack_FULL_12022010.pdf. Accessed 05/29/11. x Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology. The health of Canadians - the federal role. Volume six: recommendations for reform. Ottawa, 2002. xi Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada. Building on values: the future of health care in Canada. Ottawa, 2002. xii Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat. Backgrounder: National Pharmaceutical Strategy decision points. http://www.scics.gc.ca/english/conferences.asp?a=viewdocument&id=112. Accessed 23/07/11. xiii http://www.ihi.org. Accessed 29/07/10. xiv National Steering Committee on Patient Safety. Building a safer system: a national integrated strategy for improving patient safety in Canadian health care. http://rcpsc.medical.org/publications/building_a_safer_system_e.pdf. Accessed 23/07/11. xv http://www.nce-rce.gc.ca/index_eng.asp. Accessed 29/07/10.
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31 records – page 1 of 4.