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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


22 records – page 2 of 3.

Increasing the number of family physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1494
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-21
The Canadian Medical Association calls on federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together to expand the number of comprehensive family physicians across Canada through the combined approach of training, recruitment and retention initiatives that are incentive based and developed with the input of actively practicing physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-21
The Canadian Medical Association calls on federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together to expand the number of comprehensive family physicians across Canada through the combined approach of training, recruitment and retention initiatives that are incentive based and developed with the input of actively practicing physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together to expand the number of comprehensive family physicians across Canada through the combined approach of training, recruitment and retention initiatives that are incentive based and developed with the input of actively practicing physicians.
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Initiatives to reduce wait times

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1530
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-15
The Canadian Medical Association, consistent with A Prescription for Sustainability, advocates to reduce wait times through the following initiatives: a) development of pan-Canadian wait time benchmarks based on available evidence; b) a network of regional registries and referral programs for specialized care; c) streamlined referral for investigation and specialty consultations; and d) Canadian Health Access Fund designed to support inter-jurisdictional portability of care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-15
The Canadian Medical Association, consistent with A Prescription for Sustainability, advocates to reduce wait times through the following initiatives: a) development of pan-Canadian wait time benchmarks based on available evidence; b) a network of regional registries and referral programs for specialized care; c) streamlined referral for investigation and specialty consultations; and d) Canadian Health Access Fund designed to support inter-jurisdictional portability of care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, consistent with A Prescription for Sustainability, advocates to reduce wait times through the following initiatives: a) development of pan-Canadian wait time benchmarks based on available evidence; b) a network of regional registries and referral programs for specialized care; c) streamlined referral for investigation and specialty consultations; and d) Canadian Health Access Fund designed to support inter-jurisdictional portability of care.
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Maintaining Ontario’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sick notes for short medical leaves

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13934
Date
2018-11-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2018-11-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) submits this brief to the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs for consideration as part of its study on Bill 47, Making Ontario Open for Business Act, 2018. The CMA unites physicians on national, pan-Canadian health and medical matters. As the national advocacy organization representing physicians and the medical profession, the CMA engages with provincial/territorial governments on pan-Canadian health and health care priorities. As outlined in this submission, the CMA supports the position of the Ontario Medical Association (OMA) in recommending that Schedule 1 of Bill 47 be amended to strike down the proposed new Section 50(6) of the Employment Standards Act, 2000. This section proposes to reinstate an employer’s ability to require an employee to provide a sick note for short leaves of absence because of personal illness, injury or medical emergency. Ontario is currently a national leader on sick notes In 2018, Ontario became the first jurisdiction in Canada to withdraw the ability of employers to require employees to provide sick notes for short medical leaves because of illnesses such as a cold or flu. This legislative change aligned with the CMA’s policy position1 and was strongly supported by the medical and health policy community. An emerging pan-Canadian concern about the use of sick notes As health systems across Canada continue to grapple with the need to be more efficient, the use of sick notes for short leaves as a human resources tool to manage employee absenteeism has drawn increasing criticism in recent years. In addition to Ontario’s leadership, here are a few recent cases that demonstrate the emerging concern about the use of sick notes for short leaves:
In 2016, proposed legislation to end the practice was tabled in the Manitoba legislature.2
The Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association and Doctors Nova Scotia have been vocal opponents of sick notes for short leaves, characterizing them as a strain on the health care system.3,4
The University of Alberta and Queen’s University have both formally adopted “no sick note” policies for exams.5,6
The report of Ontario’s Changing Workplaces Review summarized stakeholder comments about sick notes, describing them as “costly, very often result from a telephone consultation and repeat what the physician is told by the patient, and which are of very little value to the employer.”7 Ontario’s action in 2018 to remove the ability of employers to require sick notes, in response to the real challenges posed by this practice, was meaningful and demonstrated leadership in the national context. The requirement to obtain sick notes negatively affects patients and the public By walking back this advancement, Ontario risks reintroducing a needless inefficiency and strain on the health system, health care providers, their patients and families. For patients, having to produce a sick note for an 4 employer following a short illness-related leave could represent an unfair economic impact. Individuals who do not receive paid sick days may face the added burden of covering the cost of obtaining a sick note as well as related transportation fees in addition to losing their daily wage. This scenario illustrates an unfair socioeconomic impact of the proposal to reinstate employers’ ability to require sick notes. In representing the voice of Canada’s doctors, the CMA would be remiss not to mention the need for individuals who are ill to stay home, rest and recover. In addition to adding a physical strain on patients who are ill, the requirement for employees who are ill to get a sick note, may also contribute to the spread of viruses and infection. Allowing employers to require sick notes may also contribute to the spread of illness as employees may choose to forego the personal financial impact, and difficulty to secure an appointment, and simply go to work sick. Reinstating sick notes contradicts the government’s commitment to end hallway medicine It is important to consider these potential negative consequences in the context of the government’s commitment to “end hallway medicine.” If the proposal to reintroduce the ability of employers to require sick notes for short medical leaves is adopted, the government will be introducing an impediment to meeting its core health care commitment. Reinstating sick notes would increase the administrative burden on physicians Finally, as the national organization representing the medical profession in Canada, the CMA is concerned about how this proposal, if implemented, may negatively affect physician health and wellness. The CMA recently released a new baseline survey, CMA National Physician Health Survey: A National Snapshot, that reveals physician health is a growing concern.8 While the survey found that 82% of physicians and residents reported high resilience, a concerning one in four respondents reported experiencing high levels of burnout. How are these findings relevant to the proposed new Section 50(6) of the Employment Standards Act, 2000? Paperwork and administrative burden are routinely found to rank as a key contributor to physician burnout.9 While a certain level of paperwork and administrative responsibility is to be expected, health system and policy decision-makers must avoid introducing an unnecessary burden in our health care system. Conclusion: Remove Section 50(6) from Schedule 1 of Bill 47 The CMA appreciates the opportunity to provide this submission for consideration by the committee in its study of Bill 47. The committee has an important opportunity to respond to the real challenges associated with sick notes for short medical leaves by ensuring that Section 50(6) in Schedule 1 is not implemented as part of Bill 47. 5 1 Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Third-Party Forms (Update 2017). Ottawa: The Association; 2017. Available: http://policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/Policypdf/PD17-02.pdf (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 2 Bill 202. The Employment Standards Code Amendment Act (Sick Notes). Winnipeg: Queen’s Printer for the Province of Manitoba; 2016. Available: https://web2.gov.mb.ca/bills/40-5/pdf/b202.pdf (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 3 CBC News. Sick notes required by employers a strain on system, says NLMA. 2018 May 30. Available: www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/employer-required-sick-notes-unnecessary-says-nlma-1.4682899 4 CBC News. No more sick notes from workers, pleads Doctors Nova Scotia. 2014 Jan 10. Available: www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/no-more-sick-notes-from-workers-pleads-doctors-nova-scotia-1.2491526 (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 5 University of Alberta University Health Centre. Exam deferrals. Edmonton: University of Alberta; 2018. Available: www.ualberta.ca/services/health-centre/exam-deferrals (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 6 Queen’s University Student Wellness Services. Sick notes. Kingston: Queen’s University; 2018. Available: www.queensu.ca/studentwellness/health-services/services-offered/sick-notes (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 7 Ministry of Labour. The Changing Workplaces Review: An Agenda for Workplace Rights. Final Report. Toronto: Ministry of Labour; 2017 May. Available: https://files.ontario.ca/books/mol_changing_workplace_report_eng_2_0.pdf (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 8 Canadian Medical Association (CMA). One in four Canadian physicians report burnout [media release]. Ottawa: The Association; 2018 Oct 10. Available: www.cma.ca/En/Pages/One-in-four-Canadian-physicians-report-burnout-.aspx (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 9 Leslie C. The burden of paperwork. Med Post 2018 Apr.
Documents
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Medical direction and administrative responsibility

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy703
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC81-17
That the following be adopted as Canadian Medical Association policy: Medical direction and administrative responsibility: a) service departments which carry out prescribed medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy in hospitals or clinics must have a medical director who is accountable to the hospital board through the hospital administrator and professionally accountable through the normal channels to the organized medical staff. Such medical service departments include medical laboratory services, radiological services, respiratory technology, physiotherapy and nuclear medicine services. The appointment of a medical director for each such service department is essential in order to ensure the best possible service to the patient and to the hospital and to coordinate the related medical programs for the patient, b) the size and complexity of some service departments which carry out medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy may require the appointment of administrative assistants to the medical director, and these may be trained in the disciplines of physiotherapy, radiography, medical laboratory technology, respiratory technology, nuclear medicine technology, etc. They should be responsible to the medical director of the hospital services department and should not be head of the department reporting directly to the hospital administrator. In the small centres where there is not a full-time medical specialist on the medical staff the medical director of the service department should be a qualified physician. Such a non- specialized medical director should establish regular communication with a specialist in the field who may be consulted on general and specific questions, c) it is also recognized that some allied health personnel working in service departments have advanced technical and/or treatment skills. These should be recognized and profitably utilized always under the supervision and accountability of the medical director of the specific service.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1981-08-28
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Resolution
GC81-17
That the following be adopted as Canadian Medical Association policy: Medical direction and administrative responsibility: a) service departments which carry out prescribed medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy in hospitals or clinics must have a medical director who is accountable to the hospital board through the hospital administrator and professionally accountable through the normal channels to the organized medical staff. Such medical service departments include medical laboratory services, radiological services, respiratory technology, physiotherapy and nuclear medicine services. The appointment of a medical director for each such service department is essential in order to ensure the best possible service to the patient and to the hospital and to coordinate the related medical programs for the patient, b) the size and complexity of some service departments which carry out medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy may require the appointment of administrative assistants to the medical director, and these may be trained in the disciplines of physiotherapy, radiography, medical laboratory technology, respiratory technology, nuclear medicine technology, etc. They should be responsible to the medical director of the hospital services department and should not be head of the department reporting directly to the hospital administrator. In the small centres where there is not a full-time medical specialist on the medical staff the medical director of the service department should be a qualified physician. Such a non- specialized medical director should establish regular communication with a specialist in the field who may be consulted on general and specific questions, c) it is also recognized that some allied health personnel working in service departments have advanced technical and/or treatment skills. These should be recognized and profitably utilized always under the supervision and accountability of the medical director of the specific service.
Text
That the following be adopted as Canadian Medical Association policy: Medical direction and administrative responsibility: a) service departments which carry out prescribed medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy in hospitals or clinics must have a medical director who is accountable to the hospital board through the hospital administrator and professionally accountable through the normal channels to the organized medical staff. Such medical service departments include medical laboratory services, radiological services, respiratory technology, physiotherapy and nuclear medicine services. The appointment of a medical director for each such service department is essential in order to ensure the best possible service to the patient and to the hospital and to coordinate the related medical programs for the patient, b) the size and complexity of some service departments which carry out medical diagnostic tests and/or therapy may require the appointment of administrative assistants to the medical director, and these may be trained in the disciplines of physiotherapy, radiography, medical laboratory technology, respiratory technology, nuclear medicine technology, etc. They should be responsible to the medical director of the hospital services department and should not be head of the department reporting directly to the hospital administrator. In the small centres where there is not a full-time medical specialist on the medical staff the medical director of the service department should be a qualified physician. Such a non- specialized medical director should establish regular communication with a specialist in the field who may be consulted on general and specific questions, c) it is also recognized that some allied health personnel working in service departments have advanced technical and/or treatment skills. These should be recognized and profitably utilized always under the supervision and accountability of the medical director of the specific service.
Less detail
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-86
The Canadian Medical Association requests that in order to enhance the transparency and accountability of Medicare, the government should identify in their annual public accounts the sum of money expended on insured physician services and acute hospital care (Medicare cost).
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-86
The Canadian Medical Association requests that in order to enhance the transparency and accountability of Medicare, the government should identify in their annual public accounts the sum of money expended on insured physician services and acute hospital care (Medicare cost).
Text
The Canadian Medical Association requests that in order to enhance the transparency and accountability of Medicare, the government should identify in their annual public accounts the sum of money expended on insured physician services and acute hospital care (Medicare cost).
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National wait-time monitoring system

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1532
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-17
The Canadian Medical Association advocates for the implementation of a national wait-time monitoring system for a broad range of medical conditions and diagnostic services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-17
The Canadian Medical Association advocates for the implementation of a national wait-time monitoring system for a broad range of medical conditions and diagnostic services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association advocates for the implementation of a national wait-time monitoring system for a broad range of medical conditions and diagnostic services.
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Payment for discussions of patient health with other health professionals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1508
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-44
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-44
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any discussion regarding a patient's health between a physician and another health professional is a medical act to be duly compensated.
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Professional advisory committee to the Conference of Health Ministers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1533
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-26
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to implement a professional advisory committee to the Conference of Health Ministers comprised of physicians and other front line providers representing national health organizations.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-26
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to implement a professional advisory committee to the Conference of Health Ministers comprised of physicians and other front line providers representing national health organizations.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to implement a professional advisory committee to the Conference of Health Ministers comprised of physicians and other front line providers representing national health organizations.
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Renewing medical equipment in the healthcare system

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1531
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-16
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal and provincial/territorial governments to invest heavily in renewing the medical equipment in the healthcare system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC04-16
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal and provincial/territorial governments to invest heavily in renewing the medical equipment in the healthcare system.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges federal and provincial/territorial governments to invest heavily in renewing the medical equipment in the healthcare system.
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Role of physicians in private delivery of publicly funded medical services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1516
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-83
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon federal, provincial and territorial governments to respect the role and the independence of physicians in their private delivery of publicly funded medical services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-83
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon federal, provincial and territorial governments to respect the role and the independence of physicians in their private delivery of publicly funded medical services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls upon federal, provincial and territorial governments to respect the role and the independence of physicians in their private delivery of publicly funded medical services.
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22 records – page 2 of 3.