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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


12 records – page 1 of 2.

Completion of government forms

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8868
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-56
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to: a. acquire physician input into the design and content of forms completed by physicians for the federal government and its agencies; b. review the responsibilities and extent to which the federal government and/or patients bear the costs of all physician assessments and services required for completion of government forms; and c. establish an appropriate fee structure for payment of all physician services required for completion of all federally mandated forms.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-56
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to: a. acquire physician input into the design and content of forms completed by physicians for the federal government and its agencies; b. review the responsibilities and extent to which the federal government and/or patients bear the costs of all physician assessments and services required for completion of government forms; and c. establish an appropriate fee structure for payment of all physician services required for completion of all federally mandated forms.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to: a. acquire physician input into the design and content of forms completed by physicians for the federal government and its agencies; b. review the responsibilities and extent to which the federal government and/or patients bear the costs of all physician assessments and services required for completion of government forms; and c. establish an appropriate fee structure for payment of all physician services required for completion of all federally mandated forms.
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Medical officers of health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11273
Date
2014-08-20
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC14-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the right and duty of medical officers of health to speak publicly to the citizens they serve.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2014-08-20
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC14-77
The Canadian Medical Association supports the right and duty of medical officers of health to speak publicly to the citizens they serve.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the right and duty of medical officers of health to speak publicly to the citizens they serve.
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Palliative care services and expertise

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11216
Date
2014-08-20
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC14-20
The Canadian Medical Association believes that all health care providers should have access to referral for palliative care services and expertise.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2014-08-20
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC14-20
The Canadian Medical Association believes that all health care providers should have access to referral for palliative care services and expertise.
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The Canadian Medical Association believes that all health care providers should have access to referral for palliative care services and expertise.
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Patient-focused funding for hospital services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8867
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-55
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the provincial/territorial medical associations to co-host a workshop on the financial and patient care implications of patient-focused funding for hospital services and pay-for-performance for physician services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-55
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the provincial/territorial medical associations to co-host a workshop on the financial and patient care implications of patient-focused funding for hospital services and pay-for-performance for physician services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the provincial/territorial medical associations to co-host a workshop on the financial and patient care implications of patient-focused funding for hospital services and pay-for-performance for physician services.
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Patient-focused Funding (PFF)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9000
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
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Physician retention

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8926
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
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Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance -December 7, 2007

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9057
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
It is a pleasure to address the Standing Committee on Finance today as part of your pre-budget consultations. In keeping with the theme set by the Committee, our presentation - Tax Incentives for Better Living - focuses on changing the tax system to better support the health and well being of all Canadians. Today I will share with you three recommendations improving the health of Canadians and productivity of the Canadian economy: First, tax incentives for pre-paid long-term care insurance; Second, tax incentives to retain and recruit more doctors and nurses; Third, tax incentives to enhance health system productivity and quality improvements. 1. Long Term Care insurance Canada's population is ageing fast. Yet, long-term care has received little policy attention in Canada. Unlike other countries like the UK and Germany who have systems in place, Canada is not prepared to address these looming challenges. The first of the baby-boomers will turn 65 in 2011. By 2031, seniors will comprise one quarter of the population - double the current proportion of 13%. The second challenge is the lack of health service labour force that will be able to care for this ageing population. Long-term care cannot and should not be financed on the same pay-as-you-go basis as medical/hospital insurance. Therefore the CMA urges the Committee to consider either tax-pre-paid or tax-deferred options for funding long-term care. These options are examined in full in the package we have supplied you with today. 2. Improving access to quality care Canada's physician shortage is a critical issue. Here in Quebec, 1 in 4 people do not have access to a family physician. Overall 3.5 people in Canada do not have a family Physician. Despite this dire shortage, the Canada Student Loans program creates barriers to the training of more physicians. Medical students routinely begin their postgraduate training with debts of over $120,000. Although still in training, they must begin paying back their medical school loans as they complete their graduate training. This policy affects both the kind of specialty that physicians-in-training choose, and ultimately where they decide to practice. We urge this Committee to recommend the extension of interest-free status on Canada Student Loans for all eligible health professional students pursuing postgraduate training. 3. Health System IT: increasing productivity and quality of care The last issue I will address is health system automation. Investment in information technology will lead to better, safer and cheaper patient care. In spite of the recent $400 million transfer to Canada Health Infoway, Canada still ranks at the bottom of the G8 countries in access to health information technologies. We spend just one-third of the OECD average on IT in our hospitals. This is a significant factor with respect to our poor record in avoidable adverse health effects. An Electronic Health Record (EHR) could provide annual, system-wide savings of $6.1 billion - every year - and reduce wait times and thereby absenteeism. But, the EHR potential can only be realized if physician's offices across Canada are fully automated. The federal government could invest directly in physician office automation by introducing dedicated tax credits or by accelerating the capital cost allowance related to health information technologies for patients. Before I conclude, the CMA again urges the Committee to address a long-standing tax issue that costs physicians and the health care system over $65 million a year. When you add hospitals - that cost more than doubles to over $145 million-or the equivalent of 60 MRI machines a year. The application of the GST on physicians is a consumption tax on a producer of vital services and affects the ability of physicians to provide care to their patients. And now with the emphasis on further sales tax harmonization, the problem will be compounded. Nearly 20 years ago when the GST was put into place, physician office expenses were relatively low for example: tongue depressors, bandages and small things. There was practically no use computers or information technology. How many of you used computers 20 years ago? Now Canadian physicians' could be and should be using 21st century equipment that is expensive but powerful. This powerful diagnostic equipment can save lives and save the system millions of dollars in the long run. It provides a clear return on investment. Yet, physicians still have to pay the GST (and the PST) on diagnostic equipment that costs a minimum of $500,000 that's an extra $30,000 that physicians must pay. The result of this misalignment of tax policy and health policy is that most Radiologists' diagnostic imaging equipment is over 30-years old. Canadians deserve better. It's time for the federal government to stop taxing health care. We urge the Committee to recommend the "zero-rating" publicly funded health services or to provide one-hundred percent tax rebates to physicians and hospitals. Conclusion In conclusion, we trust the Committee recognizes the benefits of aligning tax policy with health policy in order to create the right incentives for citizens to realize their potential. By supporting: 1. Tax Incentives for Long-Term Care 2. Tax Incentives to Bolster Health Human Resources and, 3. Tax Incentives to Support Health System Automation. This committee can respond to immediate access to health care pressures that Canadians are facing. Delaying a response to these pressures will have an impact on the competiveness of our economy now, and with compounding effects in the future. I appreciate the opportunity of entering into a dialogue with members of the Committee and look forward to your questions. Thank you.
Documents
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Processes to credential for and to grant and renew privileges to practice medicine

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11272
Date
2014-08-20
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC14-76
The Canadian Medical Association will produce policy recommendations to allow for the involvement of practising physicians and provincial/territorial medical associations in the development of processes to credential for and to grant and renew privileges to practice medicine.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2014-08-20
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC14-76
The Canadian Medical Association will produce policy recommendations to allow for the involvement of practising physicians and provincial/territorial medical associations in the development of processes to credential for and to grant and renew privileges to practice medicine.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will produce policy recommendations to allow for the involvement of practising physicians and provincial/territorial medical associations in the development of processes to credential for and to grant and renew privileges to practice medicine.
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Response to “Consultation Document – Disability Tax Credit Public Consultations” CMA Submission to Canada Revenue Agency

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14025
Date
2014-12-19
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2014-12-19
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) submits this response to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) as part of its public consultation on the Disability Tax Credit. The CMA has long-standing and significant concerns pertaining to the Disability Tax Credit. Most notable is the recent legislative development that resulted in physicians being captured in the definition of “promoter”. In light of the significant concern with physicians being captured in the definition of “promoter”, this submission will focus exclusively on the regulatory development following the enactment of the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act. However, the CMA will follow up at a later date with feedback and recommendations to CRA on how the Disability Tax Credit form and process can be improved. Prior to providing the CMA’s position for consideration as part of the regulatory consultation, relevant background respecting the CMA’s participation and recommendations during the legislative process is reviewed. 2. Background: CMA’s Recommendations during the Legislative Process The CMA actively monitored and participated in the consultation process during the legislative development of Bill C-462, Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act. During its consideration by the House of Commons, the CMA appeared before the House of Commons Finance Committee and formally submitted its recommendations.1 The CMA’s submission to the Finance Committee is attached as an appendix for reference. Throughout this process, the CMA consistently raised its concern that the bill proposed to include physicians in the definition of “promoter”, to which the response was consistently that physicians would not be captured. The Member of Parliament sponsoring the bill conveyed this message at the second reading stage in the House of Commons: 1 Canada. Parliament. House of Commons. Standing Committee on Finance (2013). Evidence, May 7, 2013. 41st Parliament, 1st Session. Retrieved from www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=6138958&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=41&Ses=1 “Mr. Massimo Pacetti: Mr. Speaker…[in] her bill, she says that the definition of a promoter means a person who directly or indirectly accepts or charges a fee in respect to a disability tax credit. Who is a promoter exactly? Is a doctor, or a lawyer or an accountant considered a promoter? Mrs. Cheryl Gallant: Mr. Speaker, that is an excellent question from my colleague opposite. We are looking at third party promoters quite apart from the regular tax preparers and accountants. It is a new cottage industry that sprung up once the 10- year retroactive provision was made. It recognizes that there are volunteer organizations and even constituency offices that do this type of work. They help constituents fill out applications for tax credits. There is a provision for exemptions so people who volunteer their time at no charge or doctors do not fall into this.”2 In contradiction to this statement, during the Senate National Finance Committee’s study of Bill C-462, CRA Assistant Commissioner Brian McCauley confirmed the CMA’s concerns, stating explicitly that physicians would be captured in the definition of “promoter” and explained “they have to be captured because, if they weren't, you leave a significant compliance loophole”.3 As will be explained further below in this submission, this statement reveals a lack of understanding of the implications of capturing physicians in the definition of “promoter”, in that it has established duplicative regulatory oversight of physicians, specific to the Disability Tax Credit form. 3. Priority Issue: Identify Physicians as an Exempt Profession in Regulation The CMA has been consistent in our opposition to the approach that resulted in physicians being included in the definition of “promoters”. The definition of “promoter” captures physicians who may charge a fee to complete the disability tax credit form, a typical practice 2 C. Gallant. (2013 Feb. 5) Parliament of Canada. Debates of House of Commons (Hansard). 41st Parliament, 1st Session. Retrieved at www.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?Language=E&Mode=1&DocId=5962192#Int-7872066 3 Canada. Parliament. Senate. Standing Committee on National Finance (2014). Evidence, April 2, 2014. 41st Parliament, 2nd Session. Retrieved at www.parl.gc.ca/Content/SEN/Committee/412/nffn/09ev-51313-e.htm?Language=E&Parl=41&Ses=2&comm_id=13. for uninsured physician services. As indicated on page 4 of the CRA’s consultation document, the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act includes the authority to “identify the type of promoter, if any, who is exempt from the reporting requirements under the Act.” Two questions are included on page 7 of the consultation document in relation to this regulatory authority. It is the CMA’s recommendation in response to Question 12 (“Are there any groups or professions that should be exempt from the reporting requirements of the new Act?”) that physicians licensed to practice are identified in regulation as an exempt profession. Specifically, the CMA recommends that CRA include an exemption in the regulations for “a health care practitioner duly licensed under the applicable regulatory authority who provides health care and treatment” from the reporting requirements of the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act. As explained below, this exemption will not introduce a potential loophole that may be exploited by third party companies to circumvent the new restrictions and will mitigate the legislative development that has introduced duplicative regulatory oversight of physicians. 4. Exemption Required to Avoid Duplicative Regulatory Regime; Not a Loophole By capturing physicians in the definition of promoters, the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act has introduced a duplicative regulatory body for physicians: a development which the CMA has fundamentally opposed. As CMA understands it, the CRA’s key concern in capturing physicians in the definition of promoter is with respect to the possibility that third party companies may circumvent these limitations by employing a physician. As previously noted, this issue was raised by CRA’s Assistant Commissioner Brian McCauley in his appearance before the Senate National Finance Committee during its study of Bill C-462. A) CMA’s Recommendation Respects Existing Regulatory Oversight Regime of Physicians The CMA’s recommendation and regulatory proposal limits the exemption of physicians as a profession to those currently licensed under the regulatory authority of provincial/territorial medical regulatory colleges. In Canada, medical practice is the regulatory purview of provinces and territories. Charging a fee for the completion of a form is a typical practice for uninsured services – these are services that fall outside of provincial/territorial health insurance coverage. The practice of charging a fee for an uninsured service by a licensed physician is an activity that is part of medical practice. Such fees are subject to guidelines by provincial and territorial medical associations and oversight by provincial/territorial medical regulatory colleges. The regulatory oversight, including licensing, of physicians falls under the statutory authority of medical regulatory colleges, as legislated and regulated by provincial and territorial governments. For example, in the Province of Saskatchewan, the Medical Profession Act, 1981 establishes the regulatory authority of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan. This regulatory authority is comprehensive and captures: medical licensure, governing standards of practice, professional oversight, disciplinary proceedings, and offences. In Ontario, this authority is established by the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991; in British Columbia, by the Health Professions Act, 1996, and so on. B) CMA’s Recommendation Does Not Introduce a Loophole The exemption of physicians as a profession that is “duly licensed under the applicable regulatory authority who provides health care and treatment” would not constitute a loophole. Firstly, any concerns regarding the practices of a physician that is exempted based on this definition could be advanced to the applicable regulatory college for regulatory oversight and if appropriate, discipline. The CMA’s proposed regulatory exemption would not be applicable in the case of a physician not licensed to practice; in this case, the individual would not be under the regulatory authority of a medical regulatory college and would fall under the CRA’s regulatory purview, as established by the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act. With regard to the example raised by CRA’s Assistant Commissioner Brian McCauley in his remarks before the Senate Committee of a retired doctor hired by promoter, retired physicians can retain their licence. If this was the case for this particular physician, as noted above, when CRA had concerns regarding this physician’s actions, his or her regulatory college could have taken appropriate disciplinary action. If, on the other hand, this retired physician’s licence had lapsed, both the individual and the promoter who hired him or her would be potentially liable for fraud (assuming that the term “medical doctor” used in Form T2201 refers to an actively licensed physician) which would convey more serious consequences than those proposed by the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act. 5. Conclusion The CMA strongly encourages the CRA to identify physicians as a profession that is exempt from the reporting requirements of the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act. This exemption is critical to ensure that possible unintended consequences, specifically duplicative regulatory oversight of physicians, are avoided.
Documents
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Self-regulation of physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9054
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-09-26
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD08-02-24
The Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors expresses its strong support for self-regulation of physicians and opposes any legislation that undermines this principle.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-09-26
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD08-02-24
The Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors expresses its strong support for self-regulation of physicians and opposes any legislation that undermines this principle.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors expresses its strong support for self-regulation of physicians and opposes any legislation that undermines this principle.
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12 records – page 1 of 2.