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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


26 records – page 1 of 3.

Auditing Physician Billings

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1878
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2004-12-04
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
Auditing Physician Billings Purpose: The CMA has developed a set of guiding principles to assist in the formation and modification of provincial/territorial billing audit processes. These principles will ensure that billing audit systems are fair, transparent, effective and timely, and that they uphold their original objectives of ensuring the accountability of public expenditures and educating physicians on appropriate billing practices. Background: As payments to physicians are made through public monies, the integrity of the payment system is validated through physician billing audits and reviews. Audits and reviews are usually prompted by: billings that appear to be outside of the “norm,” patient complaints, physician complaints or a “focus” on a particular service/area of practice/group of physicians. Each province/territory is responsible for and has in place particular processes and procedures to review physician billings. Billing audits can be stressful events that, regardless of the audit outcome, have had adverse effects on a physician’s health and practice. Although changes over the years in billing audit practices have occurred, they have not addressed all of the physicians’ concerns. Inadequacies in the existing procedures, such as the lack of a clear decision-making process, established review timelines and options for recourse still remain. In response to this situation, many provinces/territories are reviewing and modifying their existing billing audit process. The CMA and Canada’s physicians believe in an open, accountable and transparent health care financing system. It is for this reason that the CMA has developed this set of principles related to the key components of the audit process to ensure it is fair, efficient, effective and serves the purpose it was originally intended – to ensure the accountability of public funds and to educate physicians on proper billing practices. Principles: Education on proper billing practices: The audit and review process must be undertaken as an educational exercise. In a fee based system, billing code use and interpretation are complex and can often lead to unintentional errors. If or when inconsistencies occur, the physician must be alerted and provided with the opportunity to explain his/her billing behaviour. To assist in moving the audit and review process from under a cloud of perceived punishment to that of educational enlightenment, the repayment of any funds shall not commence until the audit and review process is complete and all appeal options have been exercised. As part of this overall educational framework, it is recommended that all newly licensed physicians be offered an educational program on proper billing interpretations, procedures and practices, and of the audit process itself. Fair, Transparent and Timely Process: In order for the audit and review process to be perceived as fair, it must operate at arms length from governments and the Colleges. As a profession, physicians have been granted the privilege of self-regulation by society. Given that medicine is a highly complex art and science, physicians are the only group truly qualified to set and maintain standards and to uphold accountability in matters of professional behaviour. The billing audit and review process must observe the principles of “Natural Justice” in that the: audit findings must be both impartial and be seen to be impartial and physicians affected by the findings must be offered a fair hearing by being given notice in writing of the findings; the opportunity to respond to the findings; all of the information to prepare a response; sufficient time to prepare a response; and an oral hearing if there is a dispute on factual matters or if requested by the physician. Physicians should be informed that legal counsel and assistance can be retained at any stage of the audit and review process. Physicians should consult with their respective provincial/territorial division or the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA) to see whether such assistance is available, or with lawyers who specialize in this field. Specific time limits should be adhered to in the auditing and reviewing of a physician’s billings practice, particularly related to when the review period should commence and to the duration of the review period. For example, billings should not be reviewable more than 24 months after the service is rendered and the review period should not be greater than 12 months. These limitation periods recognize that physicians will not be able to recall, with certainty, the vast amount of information contained in a patient’s medical record over the past 10 years – the average length of time in which medical records must be held. It also ensures that audits and reviews are conducted in a timely fashion minimizing undue stress and hardship on the physician and, in light of the health human resources shortage, enabling them to re-focus their attention and energy on taking care of their patients. Informed Decision-Makers: Audits and reviews to determine whether there has been any incorrect or inaccurate billing should be undertaken solely by a physician’s peers, and where possible, consisting of physicians from the same specialty and subspecialty and with similar practice type, geography and demography. This peer review group shall consider age-gender distribution and the morbidity of the patients as well as other pertinent matters in arriving at its findings and conclusions. Outcomes: Any conclusions and/or findings from an audit and review must be prepared in a written report and forwarded, in a timely manner, to the physician and the paying agency. If either party is not satisfied with the findings, they have the option of launching an appeal. The preferred route would be to pursue and use Alternative Dispute Resolution processes since they tend to encourage a more co-operative climate resulting in fair and appropriate settlements, while avoiding the excessive financial, psychological and procedural costs that can be associated with formal court proceedings. Conclusion: These guiding principles are the product of an international, provincial and territorial scan of billing audit practices. They have undergone extensive consultation with the provincial/territorial medical associations and national medical organizations. They should be used to form the foundation of and to guide any reviews or modifications to existing provincial/territorial audit and review processes. CMA Policy, Medical Professionalism, 2002. Student Behaviour Guide_Natural.Justice.htm, Dec. 2002
Documents
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Clinical practice guidelines

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10456
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-19
The Canadian Medical Association will propose deployment strategies to ensure maximum use of clinical practice guidelines by physicians.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Ethics and medical professionalism
Resolution
GC12-19
The Canadian Medical Association will propose deployment strategies to ensure maximum use of clinical practice guidelines by physicians.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will propose deployment strategies to ensure maximum use of clinical practice guidelines by physicians.
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CMA's Submission to Finance Canada regarding proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10353
Date
2012-02-14
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2012-02-14
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
As previously indicated in the Retirement Income Improvement Coalition's (RIIC) letter to the Minister of Finance on August 10, 2011, the CMA supports the federal government's proposal to expand access to pensions, specifically by establishing a legislative and regulatory framework to permit pooled registered retirement plans (PRPPs). The CMA is concerned that as currently proposed, the PRPP framework, including Bill C-25 and the proposed legislative amendments to the Income Tax Act, would limit the potential for PRPPs to contribute to expanding access to, and investment in, pensions for self-employed individuals. With respect to the pension framework, a critical issue, two principles are central to the CMA's membership of over 76,000 physicians. These are, to encourage the federal government to: 1) ensure that self-employed Canadians can retire with an appropriate level of retirement income (e.g., a 70% of pre-retirement income target); and, 2) expand the retirement savings options that are available to self-employed Canadians. The CMA's comments herein on the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act are in support of these two principles. As elaborated below, the CMA encourages the federal government to: 1. Increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals by raising the combined limit for RRSPs; 2. Expand the PRPP framework to include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans; and, 3. Clarify the eligibility criteria of "PRPP administrators" to include professional associations. 1. Increase the combined contribution limit for PRPPs and RRSPs As proposed, it is our understanding that the core benefit of the PRPP framework is in providing smaller businesses access to low-cost pension plans, thereby providing a vehicle to encourage employers to establish, and contribute to, pensions for their employees. While the CMA recognizes the value of, and supports, this objective, this proposal in effect maintains the status quo for self-employed individuals. Under Clause 10 of the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act, the contribution limit to PRPPs would be calculated as an additional component of the current registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) contribution limit. As outlined in the Explanatory Notes, "an employer's contributions to an individual's PRPP account [and...] an individual's PRPP contributions in a taxation year will immediately reduce the individual's ability to make deductible RRSP contributions in that same year." While individuals with employer contributions stand to benefit from increased retirement savings via employer contributions, self-employed individuals are merely provided with access to an alternate retirement savings vehicle. As explained in the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Researchi, "[h]igher income groups tend to exhibit a greater tendency to substitute one form of saving for another since they tend to be bound by limits...[I]f newly introduced plans are included in limitations imposed on the degree to which contributions may be deductible for tax purposes, saving may not increase for individuals who are constrained (i.e. saving up to their limit), since they would more likely substitute one type of saving for another (e.g., RRSP for a private pension plan)." Therefore, the CMA encourages the federal government to consider increasing the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals by raising the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs. 2. Include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans As noted under Clause 12, the registration criteria for PRPPs will be established by the PRPP Act, Bill C-25. Of concern, Bill C-25 limits PRPPs to defined contribution pension plans by specifically excluding from eligibility of registration: (a) a pension plan as defined by 2(1) of the Pension Benefits Standards Act; (b) an employees' or a deferred profit sharing plan; (c) an RRSP or a retirement compensation arrangement defined by 248(1) of the Income Tax Act; and, (d) any other prescribed plan or arrangement. As highlighted by the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Research, "defined benefit pension funds and annuities enable investors to share longevity risks as well as pool risky investments to diversify risk." By pooling risk, defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contributions plans. The CMA encourages the federal government to expand the PRPP framework to include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans. While the CMA will advance this recommendation to the House of Commons Finance Committee during its consultation on Bill C-25, we include it as part of this submission as modifications to the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act would be required. 3. Clarify the eligibility criteria of "PRPP administrators" to include professional associations Further clarification is required on the type of organization that may qualify as a PRPP administrator. As noted under Clause 12, an administrator of a PRPP is authorized under the PRPP Act. As Bill C-25, the PRPP Act, is still in the legislative process, the CMA will elaborate on this issue during the formal Parliamentary consultation. However, as it stands, further clarification is required on the eligibility criteria proposed by Bill C-25. While Bill C-25 can be interpreted to extend administrator eligibility to organizations that are able to fulfill the criteria established by the PRPP Act, Finance Canada's Framework for PRPPs states that eligibility of administrators would be limited to "regulated financial institutions that are capable of taking on a fiduciary role". Well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership should be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. Conclusion While the CMA supports the proposed PRPP framework in principle, the proposed limitations to PRPPs should be addressed to ensure that they also provide value to self-employed Canadians, including physicians. The CMA appreciates the opportunity to comment on the proposed amendments to the Income Tax Act and to once again advance recommendations to Finance Canada on the PRPP framework. i Prepared for the Research Working Group on Retirement Income Adequacy of Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers of Finance.
Documents
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CMA's Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance: Amending Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework to provide value to self-employed Canadians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10355
Date
2012-02-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2012-02-24
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) supports the Government of Canada's efforts to improve Canada's retirement income system, specifically by establishing a legislative framework to permit pooled registered pension plans (PRPPs) as proposed in Bill C-25, the PRPP Act. The CMA has long supported the Government of Canada's efforts to expand access to pensions, including by permitting PRPPs. However, the CMA is concerned that as currently proposed, Bill C-25 limits the potential for PRPPs to expand the access to, and investment in, pensions of self-employed individuals. The CMA has participated in, and made recommendations to, Finance Canada over the course of the department's multi-year consultative process, including responding to the 2010 consultative paper Ensuring the Ongoing Strength of Canada's Retirement Income System. The CMA has also made recommendations to Finance Canada as a member of the Retirement Income Improvement Coalition (RIIC), which consists of 11 national professional associations representing over 1 million self-employed professionals. The following discussion and recommendations align with those previously made by the CMA and the RIIC. The pension framework is a critical issue to CMA's membership of over 76,000 physicians. In addressing the pension framework, including permitting PRPPs, two principles are central to the CMA's membership: to ensure that self-employed Canadians can retire with an appropriate level of retirement income (e.g., a target of 70% of pre-retirement income); and, to expand the retirement savings options that are available to self-employed Canadians. The CMA's comments herein, and recommendations to the Finance Committee to amend Bill C-25, are in support of these two principles. As elaborated below, the CMA encourages the Finance Committee to: 1. Amend Bill C-25 to raise the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs in order to increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals. 2. Amend Section 12(1) of Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework so it includes defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans, which provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contributions plans. 3. Ensure the eligibility clauses of Bill C-25 (Sections 14-26) would allow well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership to be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. 1. Increase the combined contribution limit It is our understanding that the core benefit of the proposed PRPP framework is in providing smaller businesses access to low-cost pension plans, thereby providing a vehicle to encourage employers to establish, and contribute to, pensions for their employees. However, as explained by the Explanatory Notes accompanying the proposed Income Tax Act amendments, "an employer's contributions to an individual's PRPP account [and...] an individual's PRPP contributions in a taxation year will immediately reduce the individual's ability to make deductible RRSP contributions in that same year." While the CMA recognizes the value of, and supports, this objective, this proposal in effect maintains the status quo for self-employed individuals. Like the Canadian population at large, physicians represent an aging demographic - 38% of Canada's physicians are 55 or older - for whom retirement planning is an important concern. In addition, the vast majority of CMA members are self-employed physicians and, as such, they are unable to participate in workplace registered pension plans (RPPs). At present, physicians are more reliant on registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs) relative to other retirement savings vehicles. While individuals with employer contributions stand to benefit from increased retirement savings via employer contributions, self-employed individuals are merely provided with access to an alternate retirement savings vehicle. As explained in the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Researchi, "[h]igher income groups tend to exhibit a greater tendency to substitute one form of saving for another since they tend to be bound by limits...[I]f newly introduced plans are included in limitations imposed on the degree to which contributions may be deductible for tax purposes, saving may not increase for individuals who are constrained (i.e. saving up to their limit), since they would more likely substitute one type of saving for another (e.g., RRSP for a private pension plan)." Therefore, the CMA encourages the Finance Committee to consider amending Bill C-25 to increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals by raising the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs. 2. Include Defined Benefit and Targeted Benefit Pension Plans As currently proposed, Section 12(1) of Bill C-25 limits PRPPs to defined contribution pension plans by specifically excluding from eligibility of registration: (a) a pension plan as defined by 2(1) of the Pension Benefits Standards Act; (b) an employees' or a deferred profit-sharing plan; (c) an RRSP or a retirement compensation arrangement defined by 248(1) of the Income Tax Act; and, (d) any other prescribed plan or arrangement. As highlighted in the Summary Report on Retirement Income Adequacy Research, "defined benefit pension funds and annuities enable investors to share longevity risks as well as pool risky investments to diversify risk." By pooling risk, defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contribution plans. The CMA encourages the Finance Committee to amend Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework to include defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans. 3. Clarify the eligibility criteria of "PRPP administrators" to include professional associations Further clarification is required on the type of organization that may qualify as a PRPP administrator under Bill C-25. While Sections 14-26 of Bill C-25 can be interpreted to extend administrator eligibility to organizations that are able to fulfill the criteria it establishes, Finance Canada's Framework for Pooled Registered Retirement Plans states that eligibility of administrators would be limited to "regulated financial institutions that are capable of taking on a fiduciary role." The CMA encourages the Finance Committee to ensure that the eligibility clauses of Bill C-25 would allow well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership to be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. Conclusion While the CMA supports the proposed PRPP framework in principle, the limitations currently proposed by Bill C-25 should be addressed to ensure that PRPPs also provide value to self-employed Canadians, including physicians. The CMA appreciates the opportunity to comment to the Finance Committee as part of its study of Bill C-25. Summary of Recommendations Recommendation 1 Amend Bill C-25 to raise the combined limit for RRSPs and PRPPs in order to increase the retirement savings capacity of self-employed individuals. Recommendation 2 Amend Section 12(1) of Bill C-25 to expand the PRPP framework so it includes defined benefit and targeted benefit pension plans, which provide more secure savings vehicles than defined contributions plans. Recommendation 3 Ensure the eligibility clauses of Bill C-25 (Sections 14-26) would allow well-governed professional organizations that represent a particular membership to be able to sponsor and administer RPPs and PRPPs for their own members, including self-employed members. i Prepared for the Research Working Group on Retirement Income Adequacy of Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers of Finance.
Documents
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CMA support for fair bargaining processes

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10476
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-77
The Canadian Medical Association will support any provincial/territorial medical association in a court challenge to a refusal by their provincial/territorial government to participate in a fair bargaining process.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-77
The Canadian Medical Association will support any provincial/territorial medical association in a court challenge to a refusal by their provincial/territorial government to participate in a fair bargaining process.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will support any provincial/territorial medical association in a court challenge to a refusal by their provincial/territorial government to participate in a fair bargaining process.
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Compensation ceilings for GP's and access to front-line services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1524
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-51
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that compensation ceilings for general practitioners where they exist be removed in order to improve access to front-line services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-51
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that compensation ceilings for general practitioners where they exist be removed in order to improve access to front-line services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that compensation ceilings for general practitioners where they exist be removed in order to improve access to front-line services.
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Compensation for remote consultation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1505
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-41
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any type of remote consultation such as telemedicine and teleconsultation is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Health human resources
Health information and e-health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-41
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any type of remote consultation such as telemedicine and teleconsultation is a medical act to be duly compensated.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that provincial and territorial authorities recognize that any type of remote consultation such as telemedicine and teleconsultation is a medical act to be duly compensated.
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Family physicians and hospital affiliation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy1502
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-36
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
2004-08-18
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC04-36
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal, provincial and territorial governments to work together with the Association and its divisions and affiliates to develop initiatives that are incentive based to encourage family physicians to retain hospital affiliation and provide hospital care in supporting the provision of the full continuum of primary care to patients.
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Formal mentoring programs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10469
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-58
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-58
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the ongoing evaluation and enhancement of formal mentoring programs designed to optimize residency training experiences.
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Global health issues

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10493
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-59
The Canadian Medical Association supports efforts to encourage physician awareness of and participation in global health issues throughout their career.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2012-08-15
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC12-59
The Canadian Medical Association supports efforts to encourage physician awareness of and participation in global health issues throughout their career.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports efforts to encourage physician awareness of and participation in global health issues throughout their career.
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26 records – page 1 of 3.