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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


18 records – page 1 of 2.

Collaborative care model

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8881
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-39
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-39
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
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Completion of government forms

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8868
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-56
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to: a. acquire physician input into the design and content of forms completed by physicians for the federal government and its agencies; b. review the responsibilities and extent to which the federal government and/or patients bear the costs of all physician assessments and services required for completion of government forms; and c. establish an appropriate fee structure for payment of all physician services required for completion of all federally mandated forms.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-56
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to: a. acquire physician input into the design and content of forms completed by physicians for the federal government and its agencies; b. review the responsibilities and extent to which the federal government and/or patients bear the costs of all physician assessments and services required for completion of government forms; and c. establish an appropriate fee structure for payment of all physician services required for completion of all federally mandated forms.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the federal government to: a. acquire physician input into the design and content of forms completed by physicians for the federal government and its agencies; b. review the responsibilities and extent to which the federal government and/or patients bear the costs of all physician assessments and services required for completion of government forms; and c. establish an appropriate fee structure for payment of all physician services required for completion of all federally mandated forms.
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The environment and tax incentives

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8888
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-71
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to provide funding and/or tax incentives to assist the health care sector and health care professionals to adopt more environmentally sensitive practices.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-71
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to provide funding and/or tax incentives to assist the health care sector and health care professionals to adopt more environmentally sensitive practices.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to provide funding and/or tax incentives to assist the health care sector and health care professionals to adopt more environmentally sensitive practices.
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Maintaining Ontario’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sick notes for short medical leaves

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13934
Date
2018-11-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2018-11-15
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) submits this brief to the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs for consideration as part of its study on Bill 47, Making Ontario Open for Business Act, 2018. The CMA unites physicians on national, pan-Canadian health and medical matters. As the national advocacy organization representing physicians and the medical profession, the CMA engages with provincial/territorial governments on pan-Canadian health and health care priorities. As outlined in this submission, the CMA supports the position of the Ontario Medical Association (OMA) in recommending that Schedule 1 of Bill 47 be amended to strike down the proposed new Section 50(6) of the Employment Standards Act, 2000. This section proposes to reinstate an employer’s ability to require an employee to provide a sick note for short leaves of absence because of personal illness, injury or medical emergency. Ontario is currently a national leader on sick notes In 2018, Ontario became the first jurisdiction in Canada to withdraw the ability of employers to require employees to provide sick notes for short medical leaves because of illnesses such as a cold or flu. This legislative change aligned with the CMA’s policy position1 and was strongly supported by the medical and health policy community. An emerging pan-Canadian concern about the use of sick notes As health systems across Canada continue to grapple with the need to be more efficient, the use of sick notes for short leaves as a human resources tool to manage employee absenteeism has drawn increasing criticism in recent years. In addition to Ontario’s leadership, here are a few recent cases that demonstrate the emerging concern about the use of sick notes for short leaves:
In 2016, proposed legislation to end the practice was tabled in the Manitoba legislature.2
The Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association and Doctors Nova Scotia have been vocal opponents of sick notes for short leaves, characterizing them as a strain on the health care system.3,4
The University of Alberta and Queen’s University have both formally adopted “no sick note” policies for exams.5,6
The report of Ontario’s Changing Workplaces Review summarized stakeholder comments about sick notes, describing them as “costly, very often result from a telephone consultation and repeat what the physician is told by the patient, and which are of very little value to the employer.”7 Ontario’s action in 2018 to remove the ability of employers to require sick notes, in response to the real challenges posed by this practice, was meaningful and demonstrated leadership in the national context. The requirement to obtain sick notes negatively affects patients and the public By walking back this advancement, Ontario risks reintroducing a needless inefficiency and strain on the health system, health care providers, their patients and families. For patients, having to produce a sick note for an 4 employer following a short illness-related leave could represent an unfair economic impact. Individuals who do not receive paid sick days may face the added burden of covering the cost of obtaining a sick note as well as related transportation fees in addition to losing their daily wage. This scenario illustrates an unfair socioeconomic impact of the proposal to reinstate employers’ ability to require sick notes. In representing the voice of Canada’s doctors, the CMA would be remiss not to mention the need for individuals who are ill to stay home, rest and recover. In addition to adding a physical strain on patients who are ill, the requirement for employees who are ill to get a sick note, may also contribute to the spread of viruses and infection. Allowing employers to require sick notes may also contribute to the spread of illness as employees may choose to forego the personal financial impact, and difficulty to secure an appointment, and simply go to work sick. Reinstating sick notes contradicts the government’s commitment to end hallway medicine It is important to consider these potential negative consequences in the context of the government’s commitment to “end hallway medicine.” If the proposal to reintroduce the ability of employers to require sick notes for short medical leaves is adopted, the government will be introducing an impediment to meeting its core health care commitment. Reinstating sick notes would increase the administrative burden on physicians Finally, as the national organization representing the medical profession in Canada, the CMA is concerned about how this proposal, if implemented, may negatively affect physician health and wellness. The CMA recently released a new baseline survey, CMA National Physician Health Survey: A National Snapshot, that reveals physician health is a growing concern.8 While the survey found that 82% of physicians and residents reported high resilience, a concerning one in four respondents reported experiencing high levels of burnout. How are these findings relevant to the proposed new Section 50(6) of the Employment Standards Act, 2000? Paperwork and administrative burden are routinely found to rank as a key contributor to physician burnout.9 While a certain level of paperwork and administrative responsibility is to be expected, health system and policy decision-makers must avoid introducing an unnecessary burden in our health care system. Conclusion: Remove Section 50(6) from Schedule 1 of Bill 47 The CMA appreciates the opportunity to provide this submission for consideration by the committee in its study of Bill 47. The committee has an important opportunity to respond to the real challenges associated with sick notes for short medical leaves by ensuring that Section 50(6) in Schedule 1 is not implemented as part of Bill 47. 5 1 Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Third-Party Forms (Update 2017). Ottawa: The Association; 2017. Available: http://policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/Policypdf/PD17-02.pdf (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 2 Bill 202. The Employment Standards Code Amendment Act (Sick Notes). Winnipeg: Queen’s Printer for the Province of Manitoba; 2016. Available: https://web2.gov.mb.ca/bills/40-5/pdf/b202.pdf (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 3 CBC News. Sick notes required by employers a strain on system, says NLMA. 2018 May 30. Available: www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/employer-required-sick-notes-unnecessary-says-nlma-1.4682899 4 CBC News. No more sick notes from workers, pleads Doctors Nova Scotia. 2014 Jan 10. Available: www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/no-more-sick-notes-from-workers-pleads-doctors-nova-scotia-1.2491526 (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 5 University of Alberta University Health Centre. Exam deferrals. Edmonton: University of Alberta; 2018. Available: www.ualberta.ca/services/health-centre/exam-deferrals (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 6 Queen’s University Student Wellness Services. Sick notes. Kingston: Queen’s University; 2018. Available: www.queensu.ca/studentwellness/health-services/services-offered/sick-notes (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 7 Ministry of Labour. The Changing Workplaces Review: An Agenda for Workplace Rights. Final Report. Toronto: Ministry of Labour; 2017 May. Available: https://files.ontario.ca/books/mol_changing_workplace_report_eng_2_0.pdf (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 8 Canadian Medical Association (CMA). One in four Canadian physicians report burnout [media release]. Ottawa: The Association; 2018 Oct 10. Available: www.cma.ca/En/Pages/One-in-four-Canadian-physicians-report-burnout-.aspx (accessed 2019 Nov 13). 9 Leslie C. The burden of paperwork. Med Post 2018 Apr.
Documents
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Medical Council of Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy510
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
1989-08-23
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC89-71
That the Canadian Medical Association reaffirm its endorsement of the Medical Council of Canada as a national examination corporation.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
1989-08-23
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC89-71
That the Canadian Medical Association reaffirm its endorsement of the Medical Council of Canada as a national examination corporation.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association reaffirm its endorsement of the Medical Council of Canada as a national examination corporation.
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National Physician Human Resource Strategy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8879
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
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Patient-focused funding for hospital services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8867
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-55
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the provincial/territorial medical associations to co-host a workshop on the financial and patient care implications of patient-focused funding for hospital services and pay-for-performance for physician services.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-55
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the provincial/territorial medical associations to co-host a workshop on the financial and patient care implications of patient-focused funding for hospital services and pay-for-performance for physician services.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with the provincial/territorial medical associations to co-host a workshop on the financial and patient care implications of patient-focused funding for hospital services and pay-for-performance for physician services.
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Patient-focused Funding (PFF)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9000
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
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Physician retention

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8926
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
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Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance -December 7, 2007

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9057
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
It is a pleasure to address the Standing Committee on Finance today as part of your pre-budget consultations. In keeping with the theme set by the Committee, our presentation - Tax Incentives for Better Living - focuses on changing the tax system to better support the health and well being of all Canadians. Today I will share with you three recommendations improving the health of Canadians and productivity of the Canadian economy: First, tax incentives for pre-paid long-term care insurance; Second, tax incentives to retain and recruit more doctors and nurses; Third, tax incentives to enhance health system productivity and quality improvements. 1. Long Term Care insurance Canada's population is ageing fast. Yet, long-term care has received little policy attention in Canada. Unlike other countries like the UK and Germany who have systems in place, Canada is not prepared to address these looming challenges. The first of the baby-boomers will turn 65 in 2011. By 2031, seniors will comprise one quarter of the population - double the current proportion of 13%. The second challenge is the lack of health service labour force that will be able to care for this ageing population. Long-term care cannot and should not be financed on the same pay-as-you-go basis as medical/hospital insurance. Therefore the CMA urges the Committee to consider either tax-pre-paid or tax-deferred options for funding long-term care. These options are examined in full in the package we have supplied you with today. 2. Improving access to quality care Canada's physician shortage is a critical issue. Here in Quebec, 1 in 4 people do not have access to a family physician. Overall 3.5 people in Canada do not have a family Physician. Despite this dire shortage, the Canada Student Loans program creates barriers to the training of more physicians. Medical students routinely begin their postgraduate training with debts of over $120,000. Although still in training, they must begin paying back their medical school loans as they complete their graduate training. This policy affects both the kind of specialty that physicians-in-training choose, and ultimately where they decide to practice. We urge this Committee to recommend the extension of interest-free status on Canada Student Loans for all eligible health professional students pursuing postgraduate training. 3. Health System IT: increasing productivity and quality of care The last issue I will address is health system automation. Investment in information technology will lead to better, safer and cheaper patient care. In spite of the recent $400 million transfer to Canada Health Infoway, Canada still ranks at the bottom of the G8 countries in access to health information technologies. We spend just one-third of the OECD average on IT in our hospitals. This is a significant factor with respect to our poor record in avoidable adverse health effects. An Electronic Health Record (EHR) could provide annual, system-wide savings of $6.1 billion - every year - and reduce wait times and thereby absenteeism. But, the EHR potential can only be realized if physician's offices across Canada are fully automated. The federal government could invest directly in physician office automation by introducing dedicated tax credits or by accelerating the capital cost allowance related to health information technologies for patients. Before I conclude, the CMA again urges the Committee to address a long-standing tax issue that costs physicians and the health care system over $65 million a year. When you add hospitals - that cost more than doubles to over $145 million-or the equivalent of 60 MRI machines a year. The application of the GST on physicians is a consumption tax on a producer of vital services and affects the ability of physicians to provide care to their patients. And now with the emphasis on further sales tax harmonization, the problem will be compounded. Nearly 20 years ago when the GST was put into place, physician office expenses were relatively low for example: tongue depressors, bandages and small things. There was practically no use computers or information technology. How many of you used computers 20 years ago? Now Canadian physicians' could be and should be using 21st century equipment that is expensive but powerful. This powerful diagnostic equipment can save lives and save the system millions of dollars in the long run. It provides a clear return on investment. Yet, physicians still have to pay the GST (and the PST) on diagnostic equipment that costs a minimum of $500,000 that's an extra $30,000 that physicians must pay. The result of this misalignment of tax policy and health policy is that most Radiologists' diagnostic imaging equipment is over 30-years old. Canadians deserve better. It's time for the federal government to stop taxing health care. We urge the Committee to recommend the "zero-rating" publicly funded health services or to provide one-hundred percent tax rebates to physicians and hospitals. Conclusion In conclusion, we trust the Committee recognizes the benefits of aligning tax policy with health policy in order to create the right incentives for citizens to realize their potential. By supporting: 1. Tax Incentives for Long-Term Care 2. Tax Incentives to Bolster Health Human Resources and, 3. Tax Incentives to Support Health System Automation. This committee can respond to immediate access to health care pressures that Canadians are facing. Delaying a response to these pressures will have an impact on the competiveness of our economy now, and with compounding effects in the future. I appreciate the opportunity of entering into a dialogue with members of the Committee and look forward to your questions. Thank you.
Documents
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18 records – page 1 of 2.