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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


11 records – page 1 of 2.

Arm’s- length, anonymous pre-accreditation survey

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11647
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC15-67
The Canadian Medical Association affirms its support for the continued use of the arm’s- length, anonymous pre-accreditation survey as an integral component of the national system of accreditation for postgraduate medical education.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC15-67
The Canadian Medical Association affirms its support for the continued use of the arm’s- length, anonymous pre-accreditation survey as an integral component of the national system of accreditation for postgraduate medical education.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association affirms its support for the continued use of the arm’s- length, anonymous pre-accreditation survey as an integral component of the national system of accreditation for postgraduate medical education.
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Around-the-clock services for frail and elderly Canadians living in the community.

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11600
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC15-20
The Canadian Medical Association supports improved training, resource allocation and incentives to help primary care physicians develop robust, around-the-clock services for frail and elderly Canadians living in the community.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC15-20
The Canadian Medical Association supports improved training, resource allocation and incentives to help primary care physicians develop robust, around-the-clock services for frail and elderly Canadians living in the community.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports improved training, resource allocation and incentives to help primary care physicians develop robust, around-the-clock services for frail and elderly Canadians living in the community.
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Collaborative care model

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8881
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-39
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-39
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will advocate for the development of a collaborative care model that protects and promotes excellence in medical education.
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Increased knowledge amongst physicians in the practice of trauma-informed care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11667
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC15-88
The Canadian Medical Association promotes increased knowledge amongst physicians in the practice of trauma-informed care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC15-88
The Canadian Medical Association promotes increased knowledge amongst physicians in the practice of trauma-informed care.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association promotes increased knowledge amongst physicians in the practice of trauma-informed care.
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National Physician Human Resource Strategy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8879
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-37
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends the creation of a National Physician Human Resource Strategy that takes into account the changing practice styles of all physicians as well as the increased demand for medical care including factors such as an aging population.
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Patient-focused Funding (PFF)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9000
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
BD07-06-217
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will consider the concept of patient-focused funding, in which funding is allocated as closely as possible to the point of care between patients and physicians and covers the whole patient care pathway and follows the patient to point of service.
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Physician retention

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8926
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-112
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will examine ways to increase flexibility in a physician's workplace to create a healthy work-life balance and to communicate the importance that such balance plays in physician retention.
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Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance -December 7, 2007

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9057
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2007-12-07
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
It is a pleasure to address the Standing Committee on Finance today as part of your pre-budget consultations. In keeping with the theme set by the Committee, our presentation - Tax Incentives for Better Living - focuses on changing the tax system to better support the health and well being of all Canadians. Today I will share with you three recommendations improving the health of Canadians and productivity of the Canadian economy: First, tax incentives for pre-paid long-term care insurance; Second, tax incentives to retain and recruit more doctors and nurses; Third, tax incentives to enhance health system productivity and quality improvements. 1. Long Term Care insurance Canada's population is ageing fast. Yet, long-term care has received little policy attention in Canada. Unlike other countries like the UK and Germany who have systems in place, Canada is not prepared to address these looming challenges. The first of the baby-boomers will turn 65 in 2011. By 2031, seniors will comprise one quarter of the population - double the current proportion of 13%. The second challenge is the lack of health service labour force that will be able to care for this ageing population. Long-term care cannot and should not be financed on the same pay-as-you-go basis as medical/hospital insurance. Therefore the CMA urges the Committee to consider either tax-pre-paid or tax-deferred options for funding long-term care. These options are examined in full in the package we have supplied you with today. 2. Improving access to quality care Canada's physician shortage is a critical issue. Here in Quebec, 1 in 4 people do not have access to a family physician. Overall 3.5 people in Canada do not have a family Physician. Despite this dire shortage, the Canada Student Loans program creates barriers to the training of more physicians. Medical students routinely begin their postgraduate training with debts of over $120,000. Although still in training, they must begin paying back their medical school loans as they complete their graduate training. This policy affects both the kind of specialty that physicians-in-training choose, and ultimately where they decide to practice. We urge this Committee to recommend the extension of interest-free status on Canada Student Loans for all eligible health professional students pursuing postgraduate training. 3. Health System IT: increasing productivity and quality of care The last issue I will address is health system automation. Investment in information technology will lead to better, safer and cheaper patient care. In spite of the recent $400 million transfer to Canada Health Infoway, Canada still ranks at the bottom of the G8 countries in access to health information technologies. We spend just one-third of the OECD average on IT in our hospitals. This is a significant factor with respect to our poor record in avoidable adverse health effects. An Electronic Health Record (EHR) could provide annual, system-wide savings of $6.1 billion - every year - and reduce wait times and thereby absenteeism. But, the EHR potential can only be realized if physician's offices across Canada are fully automated. The federal government could invest directly in physician office automation by introducing dedicated tax credits or by accelerating the capital cost allowance related to health information technologies for patients. Before I conclude, the CMA again urges the Committee to address a long-standing tax issue that costs physicians and the health care system over $65 million a year. When you add hospitals - that cost more than doubles to over $145 million-or the equivalent of 60 MRI machines a year. The application of the GST on physicians is a consumption tax on a producer of vital services and affects the ability of physicians to provide care to their patients. And now with the emphasis on further sales tax harmonization, the problem will be compounded. Nearly 20 years ago when the GST was put into place, physician office expenses were relatively low for example: tongue depressors, bandages and small things. There was practically no use computers or information technology. How many of you used computers 20 years ago? Now Canadian physicians' could be and should be using 21st century equipment that is expensive but powerful. This powerful diagnostic equipment can save lives and save the system millions of dollars in the long run. It provides a clear return on investment. Yet, physicians still have to pay the GST (and the PST) on diagnostic equipment that costs a minimum of $500,000 that's an extra $30,000 that physicians must pay. The result of this misalignment of tax policy and health policy is that most Radiologists' diagnostic imaging equipment is over 30-years old. Canadians deserve better. It's time for the federal government to stop taxing health care. We urge the Committee to recommend the "zero-rating" publicly funded health services or to provide one-hundred percent tax rebates to physicians and hospitals. Conclusion In conclusion, we trust the Committee recognizes the benefits of aligning tax policy with health policy in order to create the right incentives for citizens to realize their potential. By supporting: 1. Tax Incentives for Long-Term Care 2. Tax Incentives to Bolster Health Human Resources and, 3. Tax Incentives to Support Health System Automation. This committee can respond to immediate access to health care pressures that Canadians are facing. Delaying a response to these pressures will have an impact on the competiveness of our economy now, and with compounding effects in the future. I appreciate the opportunity of entering into a dialogue with members of the Committee and look forward to your questions. Thank you.
Documents
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The role of family physicians

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8937
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-86
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to develop strategies promoting the role of family physicians in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Resolution
GC07-86
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to develop strategies promoting the role of family physicians in Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges provincial and territorial governments to develop strategies promoting the role of family physicians in Canada.
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Standing Committee on Health’s study on violence faced by healthcare workers

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy14052
Date
2019-05-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2019-05-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health human resources
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Text
Re: Standing Committee on Health’s study on violence faced by healthcare workers Dear Mr. Casey: I am writing on behalf of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) to submit recommendations for consideration by the Standing Committee on Health (the Committee) as part of the study on violence faced by healthcare workers. The CMA is deeply concerned with the state of workplace safety in all health care settings, including hospitals, long-term care, and home care settings. As in all experiences of violence, it is unacceptable for healthcare workers to be victims of violence in the provision of care to patients. While there is limited data nationally to understand the incidence of violence against healthcare workers, anecdotal evidence suggests that these experiences are increasing in frequency and severity. A 2010 survey of members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada shockingly found that, in the previous month, nearly one-third of respondents had been exposed to some form of aggressive behaviour from a patient (90%) or patient’s family (70%). The study concluded that “Canadian family physicians in active practice are subjected to regular abuse from their patients or family members of their patients.”1 These concerns were brought to the CMA’s General Council in 2015, where our members passed a resolution calling for: “the federal government to amend the Criminal Code by making it a specific criminal offence to assault health care providers performing their duties.” The CMA is prioritizing initiatives that support physician health and wellness. Increasingly, there is a recognition of the role of the workplace, primarily health care settings, and safe working conditions as having an important influence of physician health and wellness. …/2 1 Miedema BB, Hamilton R, Tatemichi S et al. Monthly incidence rates of abusive encounters for Canadian family physicians by patients and their families. Int J Family Med. 2010; 2010: 387202. Available: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275928/pdf/IJFM2010-387202.pdf (accessed 2019 May 9). Mr. Bill Casey Addressing violence against providers in healthcare settings will require action from both federal and provincial/territorial governments. In light of the above, the CMA respectfully submits the following recommendations for consideration by the Committee in its study on violence against healthcare workers: 1) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support the call to amend the Criminal Code of Canada to introduce a new criminal offence for assault against a healthcare provider performing their duty. 2) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support establishing monitoring of violence against healthcare workers, that is consistent across jurisdictions, and have an active role in responding appropriately to trends. 3) The CMA recommends that the Committee on Health support federal leadership in a pan- Canadian approach to support workplace safety in healthcare settings, including collaborating with the provinces and territories to improve violence prevention. Finally, the CMA welcomes and supports the petition recently tabled in the House of Commons by Dr. Doug Eyolfson, calling for the Minister of Health “to develop a pan-Canadian prevention strategy to address growing incidents of violence against health care workers.” In closing, the CMA is encouraged that the Committee is undertaking this study. I look forward to the Committee’s report on this topic and the opportunity to collaborate on federal and provincial/territorial action in this matter. Sincerely, F. Gigi Osler, BScMed, MD, FRCSC President c.c.: Marilyn Gladu, M.P., Vice Chair, Standing Committee on Health Don Davies, M.P., Vice Chair Standing Committee on Health
Documents
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11 records – page 1 of 2.