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Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


25 records – page 1 of 3.

Presentation to the New Democratic Party on Bill C-38

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10439
Date
2012-05-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2012-05-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
Bill C-38 covers a lot of ground and we welcome the occasion to discuss it. Right at the outset, let me remind you that the Canadian Medical Association has a long tradition of staunch non-partisanship. Our mandate is to be the national advocate for the highest standards in health and health care. In a bill as wide-ranging as this one, there is a great deal I could talk about. In the time allotted, however, I am going to frame my brief remarks around three themes... namely: First, what is very clearly in the bill; Second, what is lacking in the bill, and Third, what I would characterize as a general lack of clarity and consultation on certain aspects of the federal government's actions on health care. First, I will comment on one of the key measures contained in the budget bill. We are greatly concerned about the move to raise the age of eligibility for Old Age Security. Many seniors have low incomes and delaying this relatively modest payment by two years is certain to have a negative impact. For many older Canadians, who tend to have more complex health problems, medication is a life line. We know that, already, many cannot afford their meds. Gnawing away at Canada's social safety net will no doubt force hard choices on some of tomorrow's seniors... the choice between whether to buy groceries or to buy their medicine. I think it is safe to say it would not hold up to a cost-benefit analysis. People who skip their meds, or lack a nutritious diet or enough heat in their homes, will be sicker. In the end, this will put a greater burden on our health care system. Let me now turn to a couple of things we were hoping to see in the budget but that are not there. As we all know, the Finance Minister announced the government's plans for the Canada Health Transfer in December. The CMA was encouraged when the Minister of Health subsequently spoke about collaborating with the provinces and territories on developing accountability measures for this funding. We look forward to this accountability plan for the minimum of $446 billion that will flow to the provinces and territories in federal transfers for health over the next twelve years. In both 2008 and 2009, the Euro-Canada Health Consumer Index ranked Canada last out of 30 countries in terms of value for money spent on health care. We believe that federal government should lever its spending on health care to bring change to the system. It could introduce incentives, measurable goals, pan-Canadian metrics and measurement that would link health care spending to comparable health outcomes. This would recognize, too, that the federal government is itself the fifth-largest jurisdiction in health care delivery. We believe the federal government has a role to play in leading this change and that transferring billions of federal dollars in the absence of this leadership shortchanges Canadians. This budget thus represents an opportunity lost to find ways to transform the health care system and help Canadians get better value and better patient care for the money they spend on health care. The other major piece missing from this budget is any move to establish a national pharmaceutical strategy. A pharmaceutical strategy that would ensure consistent coverage and secure supply across the country remains unfinished business from eight years ago. Access to pharmaceutical treatments remains the most glaring example of inequity of our health care system. I should point out that the Senate Social Affairs Committee in its recent report on the 2004 Health Accord also recommended the implementation of a national pharmaceutical strategy. Now I come to the third part of my remarks, which is about a general lack of clarity in regard to certain aspects of the federal government's responsibilities vis-a- vis health care. Since the budget was tabled, the federal government has announced $100 million in cuts to the Interim Federal Health Program and eliminated the National Aboriginal Health Organization. As far as we know, no one was consulted on these changes, and since they are not in the budget bill, there is no opportunity for debate on the potential implications on the health of Canadians. We are also uncertain about the impact of changes in service delivery at Veterans Affairs Canada, changes in the mental health programs at the Department of National Defence, and plans to consolidate some of the functions of the Health Canada and the Canadian Public Health Agency. There are many unknowns and these are serious matters that warrant serious consideration. The government committed that it would not balance the books on the backs of the provinces, yet there appears to be a trend toward the downloading of health care costs to federal client groups or the provinces and territories or individuals. As we have seen in the past, cost downloading is not the same as cost saving. In fact, when health is impacted, the costs will be inevitably higher, both in dollars and in human suffering. Thank you.
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National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training (NCCPMT) principles on postgraduate medical training

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy532
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-30
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the principles on postgraduate medical training developed by the National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training and encourage the Conference of Deputy Ministers to adopt these principles as guidelines for action. [Framework Principles: 1. Physicians are a national resource. 2. The physician to population ratio will be maintained or reduced. 3. The national ratio of general practitioners to specialists should be maintained. 4. The mix and content of training programs must reflect identified population health needs. 5. Further proliferation of sub-specialties should be constrained. 6. Portability of licensure between provinces should exist. 7. Reliance on the recruitment of graduates of foreign medical schools (GOFMS) into Canada should be reduced. 8. The recruitment of GOFMS into Canada for postgraduate training should be reduced, and those trainees who do enter on visas should receive training only in already recognized specialties and agree to return to their countries of origin. 9. The total number of all postgraduate training positions should approximate the number of medical school graduates times the length of post-graduate prelicensure training. 10. Training venues should closely resemble eventual practice settings. 11. Substandard training programs should be eliminated. 12. Regional coordination of sub-speciality training should be promoted. 13. Relocation of training positions across provinces should be considered. 14. As other health care providers have overlapping scopes of capability with physicians, medical training activities should coordinate with roles and training of other health care providers. 15. Trainees should be better informed of the effectiveness, efficiency and alternative allocations of existing or proposed resource commitments designed to improve health through medical care. 16. Better information about shifting human resource needs and context of practice will be provided to students, interns, residents and fellows.]
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-30
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the principles on postgraduate medical training developed by the National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training and encourage the Conference of Deputy Ministers to adopt these principles as guidelines for action. [Framework Principles: 1. Physicians are a national resource. 2. The physician to population ratio will be maintained or reduced. 3. The national ratio of general practitioners to specialists should be maintained. 4. The mix and content of training programs must reflect identified population health needs. 5. Further proliferation of sub-specialties should be constrained. 6. Portability of licensure between provinces should exist. 7. Reliance on the recruitment of graduates of foreign medical schools (GOFMS) into Canada should be reduced. 8. The recruitment of GOFMS into Canada for postgraduate training should be reduced, and those trainees who do enter on visas should receive training only in already recognized specialties and agree to return to their countries of origin. 9. The total number of all postgraduate training positions should approximate the number of medical school graduates times the length of post-graduate prelicensure training. 10. Training venues should closely resemble eventual practice settings. 11. Substandard training programs should be eliminated. 12. Regional coordination of sub-speciality training should be promoted. 13. Relocation of training positions across provinces should be considered. 14. As other health care providers have overlapping scopes of capability with physicians, medical training activities should coordinate with roles and training of other health care providers. 15. Trainees should be better informed of the effectiveness, efficiency and alternative allocations of existing or proposed resource commitments designed to improve health through medical care. 16. Better information about shifting human resource needs and context of practice will be provided to students, interns, residents and fellows.]
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the principles on postgraduate medical training developed by the National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training and encourage the Conference of Deputy Ministers to adopt these principles as guidelines for action. [Framework Principles: 1. Physicians are a national resource. 2. The physician to population ratio will be maintained or reduced. 3. The national ratio of general practitioners to specialists should be maintained. 4. The mix and content of training programs must reflect identified population health needs. 5. Further proliferation of sub-specialties should be constrained. 6. Portability of licensure between provinces should exist. 7. Reliance on the recruitment of graduates of foreign medical schools (GOFMS) into Canada should be reduced. 8. The recruitment of GOFMS into Canada for postgraduate training should be reduced, and those trainees who do enter on visas should receive training only in already recognized specialties and agree to return to their countries of origin. 9. The total number of all postgraduate training positions should approximate the number of medical school graduates times the length of post-graduate prelicensure training. 10. Training venues should closely resemble eventual practice settings. 11. Substandard training programs should be eliminated. 12. Regional coordination of sub-speciality training should be promoted. 13. Relocation of training positions across provinces should be considered. 14. As other health care providers have overlapping scopes of capability with physicians, medical training activities should coordinate with roles and training of other health care providers. 15. Trainees should be better informed of the effectiveness, efficiency and alternative allocations of existing or proposed resource commitments designed to improve health through medical care. 16. Better information about shifting human resource needs and context of practice will be provided to students, interns, residents and fellows.]
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Restrictions on the freedom to practise medicine in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy533
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-32
That the Canadian Medical Association oppose the principle of the restriction of freedom to practise medicine in Canada based on location of training in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-32
That the Canadian Medical Association oppose the principle of the restriction of freedom to practise medicine in Canada based on location of training in Canada.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association oppose the principle of the restriction of freedom to practise medicine in Canada based on location of training in Canada.
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Goods and Services Tax (GST) replacement tax

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy641
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-229
That Canadian Medical Association continue to press for fair and equitable treatment of physicians under any GST replacement tax and that the Canadian Medical Association not publicly endorse any specific form of the tax.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-229
That Canadian Medical Association continue to press for fair and equitable treatment of physicians under any GST replacement tax and that the Canadian Medical Association not publicly endorse any specific form of the tax.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association continue to press for fair and equitable treatment of physicians under any GST replacement tax and that the Canadian Medical Association not publicly endorse any specific form of the tax.
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Portability provisions of theCanada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy643
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-239
That as part of its commitment to work on behalf of the medical profession and Canadians, the Canadian Medical Association requests that Health Canada enforce the out of country and out of province portability provisions of the Canada Health Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-239
That as part of its commitment to work on behalf of the medical profession and Canadians, the Canadian Medical Association requests that Health Canada enforce the out of country and out of province portability provisions of the Canada Health Act.
Text
That as part of its commitment to work on behalf of the medical profession and Canadians, the Canadian Medical Association requests that Health Canada enforce the out of country and out of province portability provisions of the Canada Health Act.
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Educating members on physician resources, health care administration and planning, regionalization, and costs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy644
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-240
That the Canadian Medical Association working through its divisions, affiliated societies and members, be committed to assist members in becoming more knowledgeable in matters of physician resources planning, health administration, health care planning, regionalization strategies and health cost.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-240
That the Canadian Medical Association working through its divisions, affiliated societies and members, be committed to assist members in becoming more knowledgeable in matters of physician resources planning, health administration, health care planning, regionalization strategies and health cost.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association working through its divisions, affiliated societies and members, be committed to assist members in becoming more knowledgeable in matters of physician resources planning, health administration, health care planning, regionalization strategies and health cost.
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CMA/Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy752
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-03-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-07-175
That the Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors approve the draft joint CMA/CASW Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-03-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-07-175
That the Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors approve the draft joint CMA/CASW Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors approve the draft joint CMA/CASW Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families.
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Literacy and health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy753
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-203C
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the development and dissemination of simple and clear health and medical information for physicians to distribute to their patients.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-203C
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the development and dissemination of simple and clear health and medical information for physicians to distribute to their patients.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association encourages the development and dissemination of simple and clear health and medical information for physicians to distribute to their patients.
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Disease prevention and health promotion public policy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy754
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-203E
That all levels of government be encouraged to develop, in consultation with health care providers and the public, a comprehensive and coordinated public policy for disease prevention and health promotion.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-203E
That all levels of government be encouraged to develop, in consultation with health care providers and the public, a comprehensive and coordinated public policy for disease prevention and health promotion.
Text
That all levels of government be encouraged to develop, in consultation with health care providers and the public, a comprehensive and coordinated public policy for disease prevention and health promotion.
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Folic acid intake for women of child bearing age

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy755
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-203G
That a folic acid intake of 0.4 mg, per day be recommended for all women of child bearing age.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-203G
That a folic acid intake of 0.4 mg, per day be recommended for all women of child bearing age.
Text
That a folic acid intake of 0.4 mg, per day be recommended for all women of child bearing age.
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25 records – page 1 of 3.