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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


28 records – page 1 of 3.

Toward a Dementia Strategy for Canada: CMA Submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10674
Date
2013-01-21
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2013-01-21
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
As Canada's population ages, concern is growing about the capacity of our health care system to respond to the increased demands that will be placed on it. Of particular concern is the capacity to deal with an expected surge in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, a major cause of disability in Canadians aged 65 and older. The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) shares this concern. In August 2012, CMA's General Council passed a resolution supporting the development of a national dementia strategy. Background About three quarters of a million Canadians currently live with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia and cognitive impairment. People with dementia may live for years with the condition, and will eventually need round-the-clock care. Our knowledge of how to prevent dementia is limited, and we do not fully understand its causes. Though treatments are available that may delay progression of the patient's condition, there is no known cure. Dementia currently costs Canada roughly $33 billion per year, both in direct health care expenses and in indirect costs, such as lost earnings of the patient's caregivers. Since the number one risk factor for dementia is age, there is no question that with the aging of Canada's population, its prevalence will increase. The Alzheimer Society of Canada predicts that by 2031, 1.4 million Canadians will have dementia, and by 2040 the annual cost to the country will reach $293 billion. Other countries, including Australia, Norway, Netherlands, France, and the United Kingdom, have developed national strategies to address the dementia epidemic. CMA recommends strongly that Canada join this list. A national strategy could address issues of pressing concern such as * The need for research on the prevention and treatment of dementia; * The occupation of acute-care hospital beds by patients with dementia while awaiting placement in more appropriate long-term care settings. This both increases health-care costs and exacerbates Canada's waiting-list problem, blocking hospital beds which could otherwise be used for other patients. * The emotional and financial burden faced by spouses, children or other informal caregivers of patients with dementia. A Dementia Strategy for Canadians Given the terrible toll that dementia currently takes on Canadians and their health care, and given the certainty that this toll will grow more severe in coming decades, the CMA believes that it is vital for Canada to develop a focused strategy to address it. The Alzheimer Society of Canada recommends that a national dementia strategy encompass the following elements: 1. Increased investment in research on key aspects of dementia, including prevention, treatment options, and improving quality of life. 2. Increased support for informal caregivers. This should take several forms. a. Financial support. The 2011 federal budget introduced a Family Caregiver Tax Credit of up to $300 a year. However, this does not adequately reimburse the cost of a caregiver's time, which studies have shown is often much higher. b. Programs to relieve the stress experienced by caregivers; this can include education and skill-building, and the provision of respite care and other support services. 3. An emphasis on brain health and risk reduction, early diagnosis and intervention. 4. An integrated system of care facilitated by effective co-ordination and case management. 5. A strengthened dementia workforce, which includes both developing an adequate supply of specialists and improving the diagnosis and treatment capabilities of all frontline health professionals. The Government of Canada has supported similar condition-specific strategies, most recently the Canadian Cancer Strategy, initially funded in 2006 and renewed for five years beyond 2012. This strategy focuses on prevention and screening, early detection, clinical care, supporting the patient's journey, targeted research, and work with the First Nations, Inuit and Metis communities. We believe that a national strategy for dementia, bringing together partners such as the Alzheimer Society of Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Institute of Aging), the Canadian Caregiver Coalition, and other patient and health professional groups, will enhance the ability of our health care system to respond to the coming dementia epidemic in a compassionate and cost-effective manner. In 2012, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Institute of Aging) and the Alzheimer Society of Canada have invested about $30 million in research. We propose that an initial investment in a National Dementia Strategy be $25 million per year for five years: $10 million for research, $10 million for caregiver support and respite care, and $5 million for knowledge transfer, partnership development and administrative support. Therefore the Canadian Medical Association recommends: That the Government of Canada fund the development and implementation of a National Dementia Strategy for an initial five-year period. The CMA is ready to work with governments, patients and their families, health professional associations and other stakeholders to make this recommendation a reality. Sources: Alzheimer Society of Canada. A New Way of Looking at Dementia in Canada. Based on a study conducted by RiskAnalytica. C. 2010 Canadian Medical Association. A More Robust Economy Through a Healthier Population. 2012-2013 pre-budget submission.
Documents
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Town-hall consultations on the social determinants of health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10905
Date
2013-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC13-101
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and implement a strategy to encourage collaborative action on the recommendations raised during its recent town-hall consultations on the social determinants of health.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2013-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC13-101
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and implement a strategy to encourage collaborative action on the recommendations raised during its recent town-hall consultations on the social determinants of health.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop and implement a strategy to encourage collaborative action on the recommendations raised during its recent town-hall consultations on the social determinants of health.
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National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training (NCCPMT) principles on postgraduate medical training

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy532
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-30
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the principles on postgraduate medical training developed by the National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training and encourage the Conference of Deputy Ministers to adopt these principles as guidelines for action. [Framework Principles: 1. Physicians are a national resource. 2. The physician to population ratio will be maintained or reduced. 3. The national ratio of general practitioners to specialists should be maintained. 4. The mix and content of training programs must reflect identified population health needs. 5. Further proliferation of sub-specialties should be constrained. 6. Portability of licensure between provinces should exist. 7. Reliance on the recruitment of graduates of foreign medical schools (GOFMS) into Canada should be reduced. 8. The recruitment of GOFMS into Canada for postgraduate training should be reduced, and those trainees who do enter on visas should receive training only in already recognized specialties and agree to return to their countries of origin. 9. The total number of all postgraduate training positions should approximate the number of medical school graduates times the length of post-graduate prelicensure training. 10. Training venues should closely resemble eventual practice settings. 11. Substandard training programs should be eliminated. 12. Regional coordination of sub-speciality training should be promoted. 13. Relocation of training positions across provinces should be considered. 14. As other health care providers have overlapping scopes of capability with physicians, medical training activities should coordinate with roles and training of other health care providers. 15. Trainees should be better informed of the effectiveness, efficiency and alternative allocations of existing or proposed resource commitments designed to improve health through medical care. 16. Better information about shifting human resource needs and context of practice will be provided to students, interns, residents and fellows.]
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-30
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the principles on postgraduate medical training developed by the National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training and encourage the Conference of Deputy Ministers to adopt these principles as guidelines for action. [Framework Principles: 1. Physicians are a national resource. 2. The physician to population ratio will be maintained or reduced. 3. The national ratio of general practitioners to specialists should be maintained. 4. The mix and content of training programs must reflect identified population health needs. 5. Further proliferation of sub-specialties should be constrained. 6. Portability of licensure between provinces should exist. 7. Reliance on the recruitment of graduates of foreign medical schools (GOFMS) into Canada should be reduced. 8. The recruitment of GOFMS into Canada for postgraduate training should be reduced, and those trainees who do enter on visas should receive training only in already recognized specialties and agree to return to their countries of origin. 9. The total number of all postgraduate training positions should approximate the number of medical school graduates times the length of post-graduate prelicensure training. 10. Training venues should closely resemble eventual practice settings. 11. Substandard training programs should be eliminated. 12. Regional coordination of sub-speciality training should be promoted. 13. Relocation of training positions across provinces should be considered. 14. As other health care providers have overlapping scopes of capability with physicians, medical training activities should coordinate with roles and training of other health care providers. 15. Trainees should be better informed of the effectiveness, efficiency and alternative allocations of existing or proposed resource commitments designed to improve health through medical care. 16. Better information about shifting human resource needs and context of practice will be provided to students, interns, residents and fellows.]
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the principles on postgraduate medical training developed by the National Coordinating Committee on Post-Graduate Medical Training and encourage the Conference of Deputy Ministers to adopt these principles as guidelines for action. [Framework Principles: 1. Physicians are a national resource. 2. The physician to population ratio will be maintained or reduced. 3. The national ratio of general practitioners to specialists should be maintained. 4. The mix and content of training programs must reflect identified population health needs. 5. Further proliferation of sub-specialties should be constrained. 6. Portability of licensure between provinces should exist. 7. Reliance on the recruitment of graduates of foreign medical schools (GOFMS) into Canada should be reduced. 8. The recruitment of GOFMS into Canada for postgraduate training should be reduced, and those trainees who do enter on visas should receive training only in already recognized specialties and agree to return to their countries of origin. 9. The total number of all postgraduate training positions should approximate the number of medical school graduates times the length of post-graduate prelicensure training. 10. Training venues should closely resemble eventual practice settings. 11. Substandard training programs should be eliminated. 12. Regional coordination of sub-speciality training should be promoted. 13. Relocation of training positions across provinces should be considered. 14. As other health care providers have overlapping scopes of capability with physicians, medical training activities should coordinate with roles and training of other health care providers. 15. Trainees should be better informed of the effectiveness, efficiency and alternative allocations of existing or proposed resource commitments designed to improve health through medical care. 16. Better information about shifting human resource needs and context of practice will be provided to students, interns, residents and fellows.]
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Restrictions on the freedom to practise medicine in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy533
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-32
That the Canadian Medical Association oppose the principle of the restriction of freedom to practise medicine in Canada based on location of training in Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-10-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD95-02-32
That the Canadian Medical Association oppose the principle of the restriction of freedom to practise medicine in Canada based on location of training in Canada.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association oppose the principle of the restriction of freedom to practise medicine in Canada based on location of training in Canada.
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Continuing medical education in medical schools

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy540
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1972-06-16
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC72-19
That all medical schools should have recognized departments of continuing medical education competently staffed and adequately funded.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1972-06-16
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC72-19
That all medical schools should have recognized departments of continuing medical education competently staffed and adequately funded.
Text
That all medical schools should have recognized departments of continuing medical education competently staffed and adequately funded.
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Continuing medical education department heads

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy541
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1972-06-16
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC72-20
That the head of the department should be full time and have specialized expertise in the field of continuing medical education.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1972-06-16
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC72-20
That the head of the department should be full time and have specialized expertise in the field of continuing medical education.
Text
That the head of the department should be full time and have specialized expertise in the field of continuing medical education.
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Goods and Services Tax (GST) replacement tax

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy641
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-229
That Canadian Medical Association continue to press for fair and equitable treatment of physicians under any GST replacement tax and that the Canadian Medical Association not publicly endorse any specific form of the tax.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-229
That Canadian Medical Association continue to press for fair and equitable treatment of physicians under any GST replacement tax and that the Canadian Medical Association not publicly endorse any specific form of the tax.
Text
That Canadian Medical Association continue to press for fair and equitable treatment of physicians under any GST replacement tax and that the Canadian Medical Association not publicly endorse any specific form of the tax.
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Portability provisions of theCanada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy643
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-239
That as part of its commitment to work on behalf of the medical profession and Canadians, the Canadian Medical Association requests that Health Canada enforce the out of country and out of province portability provisions of the Canada Health Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-239
That as part of its commitment to work on behalf of the medical profession and Canadians, the Canadian Medical Association requests that Health Canada enforce the out of country and out of province portability provisions of the Canada Health Act.
Text
That as part of its commitment to work on behalf of the medical profession and Canadians, the Canadian Medical Association requests that Health Canada enforce the out of country and out of province portability provisions of the Canada Health Act.
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Educating members on physician resources, health care administration and planning, regionalization, and costs

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy644
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-240
That the Canadian Medical Association working through its divisions, affiliated societies and members, be committed to assist members in becoming more knowledgeable in matters of physician resources planning, health administration, health care planning, regionalization strategies and health cost.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-05-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-08-240
That the Canadian Medical Association working through its divisions, affiliated societies and members, be committed to assist members in becoming more knowledgeable in matters of physician resources planning, health administration, health care planning, regionalization strategies and health cost.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association working through its divisions, affiliated societies and members, be committed to assist members in becoming more knowledgeable in matters of physician resources planning, health administration, health care planning, regionalization strategies and health cost.
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CMA/Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy752
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-03-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-07-175
That the Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors approve the draft joint CMA/CASW Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1994-03-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD94-07-175
That the Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors approve the draft joint CMA/CASW Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association Board of Directors approve the draft joint CMA/CASW Statement on the Health and Well Being of Families.
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28 records – page 1 of 3.