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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


16 records – page 1 of 2.

Relationships with professional nursing associations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy721
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
1988-10-15
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD89-02-27
That the Canadian Medical Association and its divisions continue to explore ways of improving Canadian Medical Association relationships with professional nursing associations.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
1988-10-15
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD89-02-27
That the Canadian Medical Association and its divisions continue to explore ways of improving Canadian Medical Association relationships with professional nursing associations.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association and its divisions continue to explore ways of improving Canadian Medical Association relationships with professional nursing associations.
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Response to Health Canada's proposed order amending the Schedule to the Tobacco Act (Menthol)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13797
Date
2017-01-10
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2017-01-10
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide this response to Health Canada's Proposed Order Amending the Schedule to the Tobacco Act (Menthol), as found in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on November 5, 2016. The CMA believes that the federal government has an important role in prevention and smoking cessation, particularly among youth, to end smoking within Canada. As early as 2008, the CMA called for the federal government to ban menthol in tobacco products. In 2014, the CMA submitted a brief to Health Canada on the proposal to amend the Tobacco Act to restrict the use of additives in tobacco products. One of the CMA's concerns at that time was that the Act excluded menthol as a flavouring agent in tobacco products. Therefore, the CMA strongly supports Health Canada's proposed order to prohibit menthol in cigarettes, blunt wraps and cigars. The proposed order has the ability to deter youth from smoking since menthol makes smoking more palatable by masking the harshness of tobacco smoke. This may lead to not only a decline in youth smokers but a decline in the number of smokers in the overall Canadian population as well. The CMA issued its first warning to the public about the dangers of tobacco in 1954, and we continue to advocate for stronger measures to control smoking. Banning the use of menthol is one step towards achieving this goal. Sincerely, Jeff Blackmer, MD, MHSc, FRCPC Vice-President, Medical Professionalism Canadian Medical Association
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CMA’s recommendations for effective poverty reduction strategies

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13582
Date
2017-02-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2017-02-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association is pleased to present its views to the study on poverty reduction strategies by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities. The focus of the Committee’s study on improving the delivery of federal resources and services for the Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy is of profound interest to the CMA, given our concerns about the need to address the social determinants of health. It is that perspective from which this paper will approach the Committee’s areas of interest. Social Determinants of Health The consequences of poverty on health are well established and include lower life expectancy, higher disease burden, and poorer overall health. Research suggests that 15% of population health is determined by biology and genetics, 10% by physical environments, 25% by the actions of the health care system, with 50% being determined by our social and economic environment.1 Many studies show that people low on the socioeconomic scale are likely to carry a higher burden of just about any disease.2 1 Keon, WJ, Pépin L. (2008) Population Health Policy: Issues and Options. Ottawa: The Senate of Canada; 2008. Available at: https://sencanada.ca/content/sen/Committee/392/soci/rep/rep10apr08-e.pdf 2 Op cit. Dunn JR. The Health Determinants Partnership Making Connections Project 3 Munro D. Healthy People, Healthy Performance, Healthy Profits: The Case for Business Action on the SocioEconomic Determinants of Health. The Conference Board of Canada, Ottawa (ON); 2008. Reducing inequities and thereby improving population health should be an overall objective for all governments in Canada. The societal cost of poor health extends beyond the cost to the health care system: healthier people lose fewer days of work and contribute to overall economic productivity.3 Those living in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods experience almost 20 years less disability-free life. It is fundamental that the health impact of social and economic decisions be part of the policy development and decision-making process. Recommendation 1. The CMA recommends that health impact assessments be included as part of the policy development and decision-making process in poverty reduction strategies, including in the development of legislation and regulations. Neighbourhoods and Housing Mounting evidence suggests that the built environment can play a significant role in our state of health. The literature indicates that the following connections between the built environment and public health are possible: o Decreased physical activity; o Increased prevalence of obesity; o Increased prevalence of asthma and other respiratory diseases; o Injuries and unintended fatalities; o Heat exposure.4 4 Frank , L., Kavage S, & Devlin A. (2012). Health and the Built Environment: A Review. World Medical Association 5 Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology. (2011). Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines. Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology 6 CMA. Active Transportation http://policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/Policypdf/PD09-04.pdf 2009 7 Statistics Canada. (2006, June 28). Childhood Obesity: A Troubling Situation. Retrieved July 15, 2012, from StatsCan: http://www41.statcan.ca/2006/2966/ceb2966_004-eng.htm 8 Ibid 9 Ibid . Canada's physical activity guidelines recommend that children ages 5 to 11 should be active for at least 60 minutes a day; those 18 and over should be active for at least 150 minutes per week.5 However, physical activity includes more than exercise and leisure time activity, it also includes active transportation such as walking to school, work or errands as part of daily living. CMA’s policy on Active Transportation recommends that all sectors (physicians and other health professionals, government, business and the public) work together, as a matter of priority, to support and encourage active transportation and physical activity.6 Urban planners must work together with health professionals to understand the impact on health. Research shows that specific populations, such as children, the elderly, and low-income populations, are more affected. Children: Obesity is an issue for Canadians nationwide, but particularly so for children. Between 1978 and 2004 there was a 70% increase in overweight and obese children aged 12-17.7 Obesity in children can lead to health issues such as hypertension, glucose intolerance, and orthopaedic complications.8 Furthermore it has a high likelihood of carrying over into adulthood and may result in further health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.9 Environments that promote physical activity are especially important, including mixed use communities with walkable destinations, parks and recreational facilities.10 10 Dannenberg, A., Frumkin, H., & Jackson, R. J. (2011). Making Healthy Places Designing and Building for Health, Well-Being and Sustainability. Island Press. 11 Vogel, T., Brechat, P., Lepetre, P., Kaltenbach, G., Berthel, M., & Lonsdorfer, J. (2009). Health Benefits of Physical Activity in Older Patients: A Review. The International Journal of Clinical Practice, 63(2), 303-320. 12 Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control. . (2002). Diabetes in Canada, 2nd Edition. Ottawa: Health Canada 13 Statistics Canada. (1996-97, May 29). National Population Health Survey, Cycle 2. Canada: The Daily. 14 Creatore, M., Gozdyra, P., Booth, G., & Glazier, R. (2007). Chapter 1: Setting the Context. In M. Creatore, P. Gozdyra, G. Booth, R. Glazier, & M. Tynan, Neighbourhood Environments and Resources for Healthy Living - A Focus on Diabetes in Toronto: ICES Atlas. Toronto: Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. 15 Op cit Dunn JR. The Health Determinants Partnership Making Connections Project 16 Raphael D. Addressing The Social Determinants of Health In Canada: Bridging The Gap Between Research Findings and Public Policy. Policy Options. March 2003 pp.35-40. Elderly: The elderly population is generally less physically robust and more prone to chronic illnesses, which make them especially vulnerable to air pollution and heat exposure. Physical activity is an important aspect of daily life for this age group as it has been shown to reduce the negative health impacts of aging.11 Being physically active, however, requires accessible and safe streets, and transportation systems that cater to the needs of individuals with mobility issues. Special consideration is required when constructing the built environment to ensure the needs of this growing population. Low Income Populations: Low income populations are at higher risk for chronic illnesses such as high blood pressure and diabetes, and have a lower overall survivability for major heart attacks.12,13 They are also more likely to smoke, be overweight or obese, and are less likely to be physically active.14 Many of these factors can be linked to limited access to stable housing, housing location (normally close to highways or industrial zones with high pollution exposure), neighbourhood safety, and lack of access to or affordability of healthy food options. Recommendation 2. The CMA recommends that the federal government work with all sectors to create a culture within communities that supports and encourages active transportation and physical activity. Income Hundreds of research papers have confirmed that people in the lowest socio-economic groups carry the greatest burden of illness.15 Studies also suggest that adverse socio-economic conditions in childhood can be a greater predictor of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in adults than later life circumstances and behavioural choices.16 Finally, the countries reporting the highest population health status are those with the greatest income equality, not the greatest wealth.17 17 Hofrichter R ed. Tackling Health Inequities Through Public Health Practice: A Handbook for Action. The National Association of County and City Health Officials & The Ingham County Health Department. Lansing (USA); 2006. 18 Bierman AS, Angus J, Ahmad F, et al. Ontario Women’s Health Equity Report : Access to Health Care Services : Chapter 7. Toronto (ON) Project for and Ontario Women’s Health Evidence-Based Report; 2010. 19 Bierman AS, Johns A, Hyndman B, et al. Ontario Women’s Health Equity Report: Social Determinants of Health & Populations at Risk: Chapter 12. Toronto (ON) Project for and Ontario Women’s Health EvidenceBased Report; 2010.; Williamson DL, Stewart MJ, Hayward K. Low-income Canadians’ experiences with health-related services: Implications for health care reform. Health Policy 2006; 76:106-121. 20 Canadian Institute for Health Information. Hospitalization Disparities by Socio-Economic Status for Males and Females. Ottawa(ON); 2010. Available: https://secure.cihi.ca/free_products/disparities_in_hospitalization_by_sex2010_e.pdf (accessed 2017 Jan 5) 21 Canadian Institute for Health Information. Hospitalization Disparities by Socio-Economic Status…;Roos LL, Walld R, Uhanova J, et al. Physician Visits, Hospitalizations, and Socioeconomic Status: Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in a Canadian Setting. HSR 2005; 40(4): 1167-1185. 22 Canadian Medical Association. Policy resolution GC15-70 - Basic income guarantee. Approved August 26, 2015 Income plays a role in access to appropriate health care as well. Individuals living in lower income neighbourhoods, are less likely to have primary care physicians18, and are more likely to report unmet health care needs.19 They are more likely to be hospitalized for conditions which could potentially be avoided with appropriate primary care.20,21 In 2015, the CMA passed a resolution endorsing the concept of a basic income guarantee”22, which is a cash transfer from government to citizens not tied to labour market participation. It ensures sufficient income to meet basic needs and live with dignity, regardless of employment status. A basic income guarantee has the potential to alleviate or even eliminate poverty. It has the potential to reduce the substantial, long-term social consequences of poverty, including higher crime rates and fewer students achieving success in the educational system. In addition, resources and supports are needed to assist low-income Canadians regarding diet, shelter, skills development and other needs.. Recommendation 3. The CMA urges the Government of Canada to prioritize consideration of a basic income guarantee as a policy option for reducing poverty. Prenatal and Early Childhood Research suggests that 90% of a child’s brain capacity is developed by age five.23 High quality early childhood programs including programs to nurture and stimulate children and educate parents are highly correlated with the amelioration of the effects of disadvantage on cognitive, emotional and physical development among children.24,25 23 Arkin E, Braveman P, Egerter S & Williams D. Time to Act: Investing in the Health of Our Children and Communities: Recommendations From the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commission to Build a Healthier America. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Princeton (NJ); 2014. 24 Braveman P, Egerter D & Williams DR. The Social Determinants of Health: Coming of Age. Annu Rev Publ Health. 32:3.1-3.18. 2011. 25 European Union. Commission Recommendation of 20.2.2013: Investing in children: breaking the cycle of disadvantage. Brussels (Belgium); 2013. 26 Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Paediatric Society, College of Family Physicians of Canada. Child and Youth Health: Our Challenge: Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter. Ottawa October 9, 2007. In 2007, the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Paediatric Society and the College of Family Physicians of Canada released Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter.26 To reach their potential, children and youth need to grow up in a place where they can thrive — spiritually, emotionally, mentally, physically and intellectually — and get high-quality health care when they need it. That place must have three fundamental elements: a safe and secure environment; good health and development; and a full range of health resources available to all. Children and youth of distinct populations in Canada, including First Nations, Inuit and Métis, must be offered equal opportunities as other Canadian children and youth through culturally appropriate resources. Our children and youth must have a safe and secure environment where they can access clean water, air and soil; be protected from injury, exploitation and discrimination; and live in healthy family, homes and communities. Further, to ensure good health and development there must be access to prenatal and maternal care for the best possible health at birth and access to quality nutrition for proper growth, development and long-term health. As well, early learning opportunities and high-quality care, at home and in the community must be accessible. Opportunities and encouragement for physical activity are crucial as well as access to high-quality primary and secondary education. Finally, affordable and available post-secondary education and a commitment to social well-being and mental health are paramount. Recommendation 4. The CMA recommends that the federal government and the provinces and territories work to ensure that poverty does not continue to be a barrier to the healthy development of Canadian children, particularly in their first five years. Conclusion Socio-economic factors play a larger role in creating (or damaging) health than either biological factors or the health care system. Health equity is increasingly recognized as a necessary means by which we will make gains in the health status of all Canadians. Despite a commitment to equal access to health care for all Canadians there are differences in access and quality of care for many groups. For those that are most vulnerable, this lack of access can serve to further exacerbate their already increased burden of illness and disease. Action is still required by the federal government to tackle the underlying social and economic factors which lead to the disparities in the health of Canadians.
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Advance care planning

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13694
Date
2017-05-27
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Date
2017-05-27
Replaces
Advance care planning (2015)
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
With the advent of technology allowing for the extension of life, and as a result of the increasing importance of personal autonomy, decisional capacity, and informed consent and the growing awareness of issues related to quality of life and dying, Canadians have become increasingly interested in expressing their wishes regarding their health care and having more input into decisions about their care should they become incapable. Advance care planning (ACP) can help patients to achieve these goals. The CMA supports development of a strategy for ACP1 in all provinces and territories. ACP leads to better concordance between patients' wishes and treatments provided,2,3 decreased anxiety for families,4 decreased moral distress for health care providers,5 decreased hospitalization rates of nursing home residents3 and fewer unnecessary medical treatments.3,6,7 ACP is at the intersection of the provision of health care, ethical values and legal rights and duties. In particular, it involves the acknowledgement of essential aspects of autonomy, informed consent, and respect of patients' care wishes now and in the future, and their intentions if they become incapable.8,9 The balancing of the need to obtain informed consent for a treatment option in the present with the need to respect health care preferences that were stated in the past has been addressed using various clinical, legal and institutional approaches across Canadian jurisdictions." Physicians10 can play a significant role in ACP throughout the course of the patient-physician relationship, including in the pediatric setting. At any time, outcomes of the planning process can be documented and/or the patient can appoint a substitute decision-maker in writing. These documents can be identified as advance directives, personal directives or powers of attorney for personal care11 (hereinafter all will be referred to as advance directives). An advance directive does not remove the need for a physician to obtain consent before providing a treatment to a patient, except in an emergency. As stated in the Canadian Medical Protective Association's consent guide: "[U]nder medical emergency situations, treatments should be limited to those necessary to prevent prolonged suffering or to deal with imminent threats to life, limb or health. Even when unable to communicate in medical emergency situations, the known wishes of the patient must be respected."12 While much of the focus of ACP is on making care decisions and nominating proxy decision-makers in case the patient becomes incapable of making decisions in the future, ACP has much more utility. ACP conversations13 can assist patients in determining treatment trajectories and making decisions about the intensity level of interventions in their current care. Providers can have discussions with patients and their families about proposed treatments in the context of the patient's communicated goals and wishes. The process of ACP also helps patients and their families to become familiar with the language and processes used to make cooperative health care decisions. SCOPE OF POLICY This policy aims to provide guidance on key considerations pertinent to ACP in a way that is consistent with a physician's ethical, professional and legal obligations. This is a complex subject: physicians should be aware of the legislation in the jurisdiction in which they practise, the standards and expectations specified by their respective regulatory authority, as well as the policies and procedures of the setting(s) in which they practise (e.g., regional health authority, hospital). GENERAL PRINCIPLES 1. ACP is a process of (a) respecting patients' wishes through reflection and communication, (b) planning for when the patient cannot make health care decisions and (c) discussion with friends, family and professionals; (d) it may result in a written document.5 It informs the substitute decision-maker and provides information for the clinician to consider in the provision of care within the bounds of the law. 2. Although often associated with the end of life, ACP represents the expression of a patient's wishes for any future health care when the patient is incapable. It expresses the patient's values and beliefs regarding current care decisions and provides information that can inform any decisions that must be made during an emergency when the patient's consent cannot be obtained. For these reasons, ACP should occur throughout a person's lifetime. 3. Respect for patients' dignity and autonomy is a cornerstone of the therapeutic physician-patient relationship. Patients' right to autonomous decision-making has become embedded in ethical frameworks, consent legislation and case law.14 Respect for the wishes of an incapable patient constitutes a preservation of autonomy and promotes trust between the physician and patient.15 4. The way in which the act of obtaining consent is weighed against the patient's stated wishes as outlined during the ACP process varies according to the jurisdiction in which the patient and physician are located. EDUCATION 1. Given the practical, ethical and legal complexities of ACP, physicians, medical learners should be supported in becoming familiar with ACP and comfortable in engaging in the process with their patients. To this end, CMA supports the development of training in ACP and efforts to make it available to all physicians and medical learners.16 For practising physicians and residents, many resources are available, for example: a. Advance Care Planning in Canada: A National Framework b. Facilitating Advance Care Planning: An Interprofessional Educational Program c. Information from the Health Law Institute of Dalhousie University on the regulatory policies and legislation of individual provinces and territories d. A comprehensive collection of Canadian resources compiled by the Speak Up campaign of the Advance Care Planning in Canada initiative e. Pallium Canada's Learning Essential Approaches to Palliative Care module on ACP In the case of medical students, the CMA supports the position of the Canadian Federation of Medical Students that end-of-life training is an essential facet of undergraduate medical education. 2. The issue of the supervision of medical learners practising ACP should be clarified, as considerable ambiguity currently exists.17 Medical learners would benefit from unified national guidelines concerning the nature of their participation in ACP, especially regarding end-of-life care. In the case of medical students, the CMA agrees with the recommendation of the Canadian Federation of Medical Students that supervision be mandatory during conversations about end-of-life care. 3. The CMA calls for more research on the outcomes associated with the provision of ACP training to physicians and medical learners. 4. The CMA recommends that governments and institutions promote information and education on ACP to patients and their substitute decision-makers. PROFESSIONAL AND LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY 1. While respecting patients' values, all physicians are expected to encourage their patients to engage in ACP with them. ACP is not a one-time event. The nature of the conversation between the physician and the patient and the regularity with which they discuss the subject will depend on the patient's health status. Family physicians and physicians have ongoing care relationships with chronically ill patients are particularly well placed to have regular discussions with their patients about their beliefs, values and wishes. An effective exchange of information between family physicians (and other physicians who work in the community with outpatients) and acute or tertiary care physicians would assist in ensuring patient's wishes are considered. 2. ACP, in particular advance directives, are at the intersection of medicine and the law. Physicians should recognize this and ask patients whether they have an advance directive or have done any ACP. 3. There is wide variation across jurisdictions in terms of the requirements and procedures for ACP; therefore, physicians should inform themselves about any relevant legislation and the scope of the requirement to obtain consent within that jurisdiction when carrying out ACP. INSTITUTIONS 1. The CMA supports institutional processes that recognize and support ACP. Support for ACP includes developing a consistent process for the exchange of information about patients' wishes and advance directives among health care providers, as patients traverse sectors and locations of care. Patients with a written advance directive must be identified and the advance directive integrated fully within the patient's records18 so that it is available across the institution (and ideally the health care system). The CMA advocates for the inclusion of advance care directive functionality as a conformance and usability requirement for electronic medical record vendors.19 Provinces and territories should be encouraged to establish robust organizational processes and resources for patients in all locations of care and strong province- or territory-wide policy, such as in Alberta.20 2. Institutions and other organizations should encourage health care providers to ask patients to bring their advance directive to appointments at the same time they ask them to bring a list of their medications or other medical information. 3. The CMA supports institutional/organizational audits of structures, processes and outcomes related to ACP as an important step in improving the quality and frequency of ACP activities. ROLE FOR GOVERNMENTS 1. The CMA supports infrastructures enabling ACP, including funding that will support ACP and other end-of-life discussions. 2. The CMA promotes the incorporation of ACP into future federal and provincial/territorial senior strategies and dementia and/or frailty strategies. 3. The CMA supports the development of ACP metrics and their future inclusion in Accreditation Canada standards. GLOSSARY Advance care planning (ACP) Advance care planning is a term used to describe a process of reflection, communication, conversation and planning by a capable individual with family, friends and professionals about their beliefs, values and wishes for a time when they no longer have the mental capacity to make decisions about their health care. ACP can also involve the naming of a substitute decision-maker.8 Advance directive The legislated term "advance directive" has different names, definitions and legal authority across the country. For example, in British Columbia an advance directive is a written legal document that provides a mechanism for capable patients to give directions about their future health care once they are no longer capable. 21 As such, in BC an advance directive may, under certain circumstances, be considered "equivalent to consent to treatment and may be acted upon directly by a health care provider without consultation with an SDM [substitute decision-maker]." 8 In Alberta it is called a personal directive. In Ontario, "advance directive" is a generic non-legal term and refers to communications that may be oral, written or in other forms.8 In Quebec, advance care directives are legally binding, as set out in the Act respecting end-of-life care, which recognizes "the primacy of freely and clearly expressed wishes with respect to care. . ."22 Current legislation does not allow for medical assistance in dying to be requested by an advance directive.23 The CMA acknowledges that considerable public, expert and legal debate exists around the issue. Informed consent To obtain informed consent, physicians must provide adequate information to the patient or capable decision-maker about the proposed procedure or treatment; the anticipated outcome; the potential risks, benefits and complications; and reasonable available alternatives, including not having the treatment; and they must answer questions posed by the patient. Consent is only informed if there is disclosure of matters that a reasonable person in the same circumstances would want to know.24 Consent must be given voluntarily, must not be obtained through misrepresentation or fraud, must relate to the treatment and must be informed. Substitute decision-maker (SDM or agent or proxy) A substitute decision-maker is a capable person who will make health care decisions on behalf of an incapable individual. In all jurisdictions the health care provider must take reasonable steps to become aware of whether or not there is a substitute decision-maker before providing health treatment to an incapable patient. Legally there are implementation differences across the country. For example, in BC a substitute decision-maker is appointed through a representation agreement, in Alberta through a personal directive and in Ontario through a power of attorney for personal care. Approved by the CMA Board of Directors May 2017 1 Canadian Medical Association. Policy resolution GC14-25 - strategy for advance care planning, palliative and end-of-life care. Ottawa (ON): The Association; 2014. Available: policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/CMAPolicy/PublicB.htm (accessed 2016 Oct 17) 2 Houben CHM, Spruit MA, Groenen MTJ, et al. Efficacy of advance care planning: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2014;15:477-89. 3 Martin RS, Hayes B, Gregorevic K, et al. The effects of advance care planning interventions on nursing home residents: a systematic review. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2016;7:284-93. 4 Mack JW, Weeks JC, Wright AA, et al. End-of-life discussions, goal attainment, and distress at the end of life: predictors and outcomes of receipt of care consistent with preferences. J Clin Oncol 2010;28(7):1203-8. 5 Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association. Advance care planning in Canada: national framework. Ottawa; The Association; 2010. 6 Teo WSK, Raj AG, Tan WS, et al. Economic impact analysis of an end-of-life programme for nursing home residents. Palliat Med 2014;28(5):430-7. 7 Zhang B, Wright AA, Huskamp HA, et al. Health care costs in the last week of life: associations with end-of-life conversations. Arch Intern Med 2009;169(5):480-8. 8 Wahl J, Dykeman MJ, Gray B. Health care consent and advance care planning in Ontario. Toronto (ON): Law Commission of Ontario; 2014. 9 Canadian Medical Association. CMA Code of Ethics (update 2004). Ottawa: The Association; 2004. 10 Physician involvement is not mandatory in the process. However, it is important for physicians to engage with their patients in ACP as this can facilitate change in patients' ACP behaviour and understanding. 11 Wahl JA, Dykeman MJ, Walton T. Health care consent, advance care planning, and goals of care practice tools: the challenge to get it right. Improving the last stages of life. Toronto (ON): Law Commission of Ontario; 2016. 12www.med.uottawa.ca/sim/data/Images/CMPA_Consent_guide_e.pdf 13 Frank C, Puxty J. Facilitating effective end-of-life communication - helping people decide. CJS Journal of CME 2016;6(2). Available: http://canadiangeriatrics.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Facilitating-Effective-End-of-Life-Communication---Helping-People-Decide.pdf (accessed 2017 April 25). 14 Fleming v Reid (1991) 82 DLR (4th) 298 (CA ON); Cuthbertson v Rasouli, 2013 SCC 53; Malette v Shulman (1990), 72 OR (2d) 417; Starson v Swayze (2003) 1 SCR 722. 15 Harmon SHE. Consent and conflict in medico-legal decision-making at the end of life: a critical issue in the Canadian context. University of New Brunswick Law Journal 2010;60(1):208-29. 16 Canadian Medical Association. Policy resolution GC13-69 - training in advance care planning. Ottawa (ON): The Association; 2013. Available: policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/CMAPolicy/PublicB.htm (accessed 2016 May 26). 17 Touchie C, De Champlain A, Pugh D, et al. Supervising incoming first-year residents: faculty expectations versus residents' experiences. Med Educ 2014;48(9):921-9. 18 Canadian Medical Association. Policy resolution GC14-19 - advance care plans. Ottawa (ON): The Association; 2014. Available: policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/CMAPolicy/PublicB.htm (accessed 2016 May 26). 19 Canadian Medical Association. BD14-05-163 Advance care directive functionality. Ottawa (ON): The Association; 2014. Available: policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/CMAPolicy/PublicB.htm (accessed 2016 May 26). 20 Conversations matter. Edmonton (AB): Alberta Health Services. Available: http://goals.conversationsmatter.ca.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/ (accessed 2017 May 19). 21 Health Care (Consent) and Care Facility (Admission) Act, RSBC 1996, c 181, s.3 22 Act respecting end-of-life care, S-32.0001. Government of Quebec. Available : http://legisquebec.gouv.qc.ca/en/ShowDoc/cs/S-32.0001 23 An Act to amend the Criminal Code and to make related amendments to other Acts (medical assistance in dying) S.C. 2016, c.3. Ottawa: Government of Canada; 2016. Available: http://canlii.ca/t/52rs0 (accessed 2016 Oct 17) 24 Riebl v Hughes, [1980] 2 SCR 880; Hopp v Lepp, [1980] 2 SCR 192.
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CMA’s Support for Bill S-228: An Act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (prohibiting food and beverage marketing directed at children)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13645
Date
2017-06-14
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2017-06-14
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to submit this brief to the Senate Standing Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology in support of Bill S-228, An Act to Amend the Food and Drugs Act (prohibiting food and beverage marketing directed at children). The CMA has over 85,000 physician-members; our mission is empowering and caring for patients and its vision is a vibrant profession and a healthy population. Overview The CMA is encouraged that the Senate is considering legislation that will protect children by prohibiting marketing of food and beverages directed to those under 13 years of age. We applaud Senator Nancy Greene Raine for sponsoring this important bill. Obesity rates among children and youth in Canada have nearly tripled in the last 30 years. Obesity is of particular concern to Canada’s physicians because it increases a person’s risk of developing a number of serious health problems: high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, heart disease and stroke, type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, lower back pain and other musculoskeletal disorders, and many types of cancer. Type 2 diabetes, once found only in adults, is now being seen in children. Health advocates are concerned that because of obesity, today’s generation of children will have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. Children and youth who are obese are at higher risk of developing a range of health problems, and weight issues in childhood are likely to persist into adulthood. Diet-related chronic disease risk stems from long-term dietary patterns which start in childhood. Canadian statistics reveal children, consume too much fat, sodium and sugars (foods that cause chronic disease) and eat too little fiber, fruits and vegetables (foods that prevent chronic disease). The current generation of Canadian children is expected to live shorter less healthy lives as a result of unhealthy eating.1 CMA’s Cautions against Marketing Children and youth in Canada are exposed to a barrage of marketing and promotion of unhealthy foods and beverages through a variety of channels and techniques – tactics which undermine and contradict government, health care professional and scientific recommendations for healthy eating. Research undertaken for the Heart and Stroke Foundation found that kids see over 25 million food and beverage ads a year on their favourite websites and that over 90% of the food and beverage product ads viewed online are unhealthy.2 4 Unhealthy food and beverage advertising influences children’s food preferences, purchase requests, and consumption patterns and has been identified as a probable cause of childhood overweight and obesity by the World Health Organization.3 The CMA has long been calling on governments to explore ways to restrict the advertising and promotion of high-calorie, nutrient-poor foods. In 2006 CMA recommended that media advertising of high-calorie, nutrient-poor "junk" food in children's television programs be banned altogether. As the ways and means of advertising have expanded so too has our thinking, and in 2012 CMA adopted a policy on Restricting Marketing of Unhealthy Foods and Beverages to Children and Youth in Canada which called for the restriction of all marketing to children under 13 years of age of unhealthy foods and beverages. In 2014, CMA endorsed the Ottawa Principles and the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition. The Ottawa Principles went further to help refine the definitions, scope and principles meant to guide marketing to kids (M2K) policy-making in Canada.4 They recommend the restriction of commercial marketing of all food and beverages to children and youth age 16 years and younger. Restrictions would include all forms of marketing with the exception of non-commercial marketing for public education. At present, Canada relies on voluntary industry codes to govern advertising and marketing practices. However, recent Canadian research into industry self-regulation has shown no reduction in children’s exposure to ads for unhealthy foods.5 The CMA believes that for maximum efficacy, regulatory measures are required to minimize the negative effect of food marketing on health. Only legally enforceable regulations have sufficient authority and power to ensure high-level protection of children from marketing and its persuasive influence over food preference and consumption. Not only health organizations are in favour of restrictions on the marketing to children. Recent public opinion polling from Heart and Stroke’s 2017 Report on the Health of Canadians highlights that 72% believe the food and beverage industry markets its products directly to children, 78% believe the food and beverages advertised to children are unhealthy and 70% feel that children are exposed to too much advertising by the food and beverage industry. In her introduction of Bill S-228, Senator Raine noted that this is not the first time that that legislation on this issue has come before the Canadian Parliament. The CMA sincerely believes that now is the time for action. We cannot delay any longer. Canadian children and parents need an environment free from the influence of food and beverage marketing in which to make health nutritious food choices. Conclusion 5 Childhood obesity and overweight are serious health problems in Canada, and as such are of great concern to the country’s physicians and to the Canadian Medical Association. The causes, CMA believes, are rooted mainly in changes in our environment and their effect on our eating and physical activity habits. The consequences are extremely serious, both for individual Canadians’ health and for the sustainability of Canada’s health care system. CMA believes that the way forward requires a number of different interventions, on many levels. The prohibition of the marketing of foods and beverages directed to children is one element of a wider healthy eating strategy that supports Canadians. Once again, CMA commends the Senate of Canada on conducting this study. We urge support of the Child Health Protection Act and believe that it can assist in creating a social environment that supports healthy eating and healthy weight. 1 Canadian Medical Association, Restricting Marketing Of Unhealthy Foods And Beverages To Children And Youth In Canada, A Canadian Health Care And Scientific Organization Consensus Policy Statement, December 2012 2 Heart & Stroke (2017). The kids are not alright. How the food and beverage industry is marketing our children and youth to death. 2017 Report on the Health of Canadians. 3 World Health Organization. Set of recommendations on the marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages to children. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2010. 4 The Ottawa Principles, Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition, accessed at https://foodsecurecanada.org/sites/foodsecurecanada.org/files/ottawaprinciples.pdf, June 7, 2017. 5 Heart & Stroke (2017). The kids are not alright. How the food and beverage industry is marketing our children and youth to death. 2017 Report on the Health of Canadians.
Documents
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Care to new immigrants and refugees

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13699
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-04
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of clinical best practice guidelines for the provision of care to new immigrants and refugees.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-04
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of clinical best practice guidelines for the provision of care to new immigrants and refugees.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of clinical best practice guidelines for the provision of care to new immigrants and refugees.
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International commercial surrogacy

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13702
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-05
The Canadian Medical Association supports advocacy efforts to increase awareness of the physical and mental health risks associated with international commercial surrogacy.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-05
The Canadian Medical Association supports advocacy efforts to increase awareness of the physical and mental health risks associated with international commercial surrogacy.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports advocacy efforts to increase awareness of the physical and mental health risks associated with international commercial surrogacy.
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Nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13706
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-08
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-08
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
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Lack of access to insured health services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13711
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-12
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-12
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
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Mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13714
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
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