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46 records – page 1 of 5.

CMA Letter to the Legislative Committee on Bill C-30: Clean Air Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8714
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-02-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Last Reviewed
2019-03-03
Date
2007-02-28
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to participate in the review of the Clean Air Act, Bill C- 30. The CMA, first founded in 1867, currently represents more than 64,000 physicians across the country. Our mission includes advocating for the highest standard of health and health care for all Canadians and we are committed to activities that will result in healthy public policy. The Environment: A Key Determinant of Health The physical environment is a key determinant of a population's health and the medical profession is concerned about environmental conditions that contribute to declining health in individuals and the population as a whole. Physicians have been part of an early warning system of scientists and other health professionals calling attention to the effects on human health of poor air quality because we see the impact in our practice and in our communities. There is strong evidence that air pollution is the most harmful environmental problem in Canada in terms of human health effects. We know from the smog health studies undertaken by the Ontario Medical Association (OMA), Health Canada and others, about the public health crisis created by polluted air in many parts of Canada. And it is a crisis. A study by the federal government estimated that 5,900 premature deaths occur annually in eight large Canadian cities. This is a conservative estimate as the study focused on the short-term impact of smog pollutants using time-series studies. This study was never extrapolated to the whole Canadian population, but we know that only approximately one third of the Canadian population, mainly residents of large, urban areas, were included in the analysis.1 The OMA Illness Costs of Air Pollution study estimated that there were 5,800 premature deaths due to air pollution in Ontario alone in 2005, and examined both short-term and long-term health impacts. The OMA projected that the annual figure will grow to 10,000 premature deaths by 2026 unless effective steps are taken to reduce smog.2 In addition to premature deaths, the OMA estimated that there were 16,000 hospital admissions and 60,000 emergency room visits in Ontario in 2005 because of respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses associated with air pollution exposure. During that same year, the OMA also estimated that there were 29 million minor illness days, defined as days where individuals either suffered from asthma symptoms or had to restrict their activities. Most of the people affected by these so-called minor illness days are children. In British Columbia, the Provincial Officer for Health published a conservative estimate in 2004 that air pollution in B.C. is causing between 140 and 400 premature deaths, 700 to 2,100 hospital stays, and between 900 and 2,750 emergency room visits each year.3 The direct and indirect costs of air pollution on the health of Canadians are estimated to be in the billions of dollars. According to the Ontario Medical Association, in 2005, air pollution costs in Ontario were estimated at: - $374 million in lost productivity and work time; - $507 million in direct health care costs; - $537 million in pain and suffering due to non-fatal illness; and - $6.4 billion in loss due to premature death.4 In Canada the environment is currently considered to be the most important issue facing society. In a recent poll by the Strategic Counsel for the Globe & Mail/CTV5 a majority of respondents ranked the impact of toxic chemicals, air and water pollution and global warming as life threatening. The environment, while a major concern today for the general public, has been of concern to physicians for some time. CMA, Health and the Environment In 1991 the CMA, released a policy paper Health, the Environment and Sustainable Development6 that clearly linked health and the environment. Building on the 1987 Brundtland Report (World Commission on Environment and Development, Our Common Future) that tied sustainable development to the environment and the economy, the CMA inserted health into this pair of interactions and stated that "continued environmental degradation will increase hazard to human health." The paper concluded with a number of recommendations for governments, the health sector, and physicians in support of environmentally sustainable development. The CMA has continued to give attention to environmental issues urging the government, prior to Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, to commit to choosing a climate change strategy that satisfies Canada's international commitments while maximizing the clean air co-benefits and smog-reduction potential of any greenhouse gas reduction initiatives. In 2002, the CMA also recommended that the federal Environment and Health Ministers commit their departments to improved health-based reporting by regularly updating the health effects information for pollutants of concern. Clean Air Act: A Physicians Perspective Doctors understand the concept that success from an intervention can be nuanced. In the case of disease, physicians know and accept that there are benefits of treatment even if a patient cannot be cured. Sometimes we just reduce their symptoms, or slow their rate of decline. But when treating the natural environment, so critical to human health, we suggest that you cannot accept a palliative solution. We must aim for cure. We must commit to measures of success in terms of real improvement in health. It is through this lens that the CMA urges that you view the Clean Air Act to ensure that it is health-relevant. The CMA would like to commend this government for acknowledging the impact of the physical environment on human health and we are encouraged that the Act recognizes the intimate connection between greenhouse gas reductions and improved air quality. Air pollution does not respect provincial borders therefore it is very important to establish national objectives and Canada wide standards that are strong and consistent across the country. To be health relevant national air quality objectives must result in air quality improvements. To this end, regardless of whether they are called objectives or standards, national air quality targets must protect the health of all Canadians and must be binding. Voluntary air quality guidelines guarantee no health benefit. The federal government must ensure that there is a regulatory framework in place to ensure that the standards are mandatory across the country. The annual reporting to Parliament on the attainment of the national air quality objectives and the effectiveness of measures to attain the objectives, as outlined in the Act, is very important. Transparency in reporting is essential to the integrity of any program, but is integral to the determination of health benefit. The International Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment report released on February 2, 2007, concluded that global warming is unequivocal and that human activity is the main driver, asserting with near certainty - more than 90 percent confidence - that carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping greenhouse gases from human activities have been the main causes of warming since 1950. Its Third Assessment report: Climate Change 2001: Working Group II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability noted that global climate change will have a wide range of impacts on human health. "Overall, negative health impacts are expected to outweigh positive health impacts. Some health impacts would result from changes in the frequencies and intensities of extremes of heat and cold and of floods and droughts. Other health impacts would result from the impacts of climate change on ecological and social systems and would include changes in infectious disease occurrence, local food production and nutritional adequacy, and concentrations of local air pollutants and aeroallergens, as well as various health consequences of population displacement and economic disruption."7 Given the indisputable impact of greenhouse gas increases on climate change and its connection to human health, it is critical to ensure that Canada is moving quickly to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Clean Air Act and the subsequent notice of intent sets out short, medium and long term targets and timelines for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada. The target setting approach proposed in the Act, based on emission intensity in the short and medium term is not health relevant. To be health relevant, targets should be presented in the context of overall emissions, i.e., emissions reductions minus emissions increases. An emission reduction from a particular source is only health-relevant if we can guarantee that there is not a corresponding emissions increase at another source nearby, because it is the absolute exposure that an individual experiences that affects the risk of an adverse health effect. Just as slowing the progression of a disease can never be considered a cure, attempting only to limit the growth of those emissions cannot result in true success by any measure. It is not until 2050 that the government has committed to achieving an absolute reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of between 45 - 65% of 2003 levels. Based on the emission intensity targets in the Clean Air Act, emissions and air pollution levels will, in fact, continue to rise as will the health consequences. In order to protect the health of Canadians the government needs to set policies, with targets and timelines that maximize absolute reductions in greenhouse gases, which are consistent with the scale and urgency of the challenge. To ensure that prescribed policies result in the intended environment and health outcomes, short and medium-term targets for absolute emission reductions would benchmark progress and allow for mid-course corrections, if they were needed. With respect to indoor air quality, physicians have long been proponents of initiatives to reduce exposure to contaminants such as second-hand tobacco smoke. The CMA is concerned about the impact on human health of exposure to high levels of radon and the associated increased risk of lung cancer. The intention to develop measures to address indoor air quality through a national radon strategy is a positive step. It is important that our patients are made aware of such threats in their homes, and also that they are presented with a way to reduce their exposure. Environmentally related illness is essentially the combined result of exposure and vulnerability. We are vulnerable because we are human beings; each human being has different physical strengths and weaknesses. Some vulnerabilities to environmental influences are genetic, and some the results of pre-existing disease. There is not much that government can do about this part of the equation. Our exposure, on the other hand is related to the air we breathe, water we drink and food we eat. This is where the federal government is critical, and where the measures of success will be the most important. Proxy measures for the health outcomes that matter must be relevant from a health perspective. Health-based success can only be measured by quantifiable reductions in the exposure levels of contaminants in our air as well as in our water and soil. Clean air is absolutely fundamental to a healthy population - without it all else is irrelevant. Actions to curb air pollution must be taken in all sectors and levels of society in a concerted, non-partisan effort with the health of the population and the planet as our yardstick of success. Thank you for the opportunity to provide our comments on Bill C-30, the Clean Air Act. We look forward to working with you to improve the Clean Air Act and ensure that the measure of its success will benefit the health of Canadians. Sincerely Colin J. McMillan, MD, CM, FRCPC, FACP President 1 S. Judek, B. Jessiman, D. Stieb, and R. Vet. 2005. Estimated Number of Excess Deaths in Canada Due to Air Pollution". Health Canada and Environment Canada. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/media/ nr-cp/2005/2005_32bk2_e.html#top 2 Ontario Medical Association. 2005. The Illness Costs of Air Pollution: 2005-2026 Health and Economic Damage Estimates. Toronto: OMA. 3 B.C. Provincial Health Officer. 2004. Every Breath You Take: Air Quality in British Columbia, A Public Health Perspective. 2003 Annual Report. Victoria: Ministry of Health Services. 4 Ontario Medical Association , 2005 5 GLOBE/CTV POLL Climate concerns now top security and health One in four label environmental issues as most important, The Globe and Mail, Fri 26 Jan 2007, Page: A1, Section: National News , Byline: Brian Laghi 6 Health, the Environment and Sustainable Development, Canadian Medical Association , 1991 7 WMO Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2001, IPPC Third Assessment Report: Working Group II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, accessed Feb 7, 2007 http://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg2/348.htm
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Canada’s child and youth health charter

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10327
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
CHILD AND YOUTH HEALTH IN CANADA THEIR CHARTER — OUR CHALLENGE “There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way it treats its children.” Nelson Mandela “One generation plants the trees; another gets the shade.” Chinese Proverb Children and youth have always been a priority for the doctors of Canada — the Child and Youth Health Initiative of the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Paediatric Society and the College of Family Physicians of Canada is evidence of that. We three organizations joined together in November 2006 to launch the Child and Youth Health Initiative. In September 2004, Canada’s first ministers committed to “improving the health status of Canadians through a collaborative process.” This led to an agreement on health goals for Canada. The first of them is “Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” At the international level, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child sets out the wider rights of all children and young people, including the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. We now owe it to our children and youth to develop tangible health goals and targets. From the outset of the partnership, we were acutely aware that only a broad societal coalition could achieve the overarching goal of excellence in child and youth health in Canada. Making the health of children and youth a national priority requires a coalition of child and youth health champions, including governments, parents, health providers, businesses, schools, teachers and communities. To start that process, we created Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter. An action framework was then developed called Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge because a charter alone will not deliver on the vision of the children and youth of Canada being among the healthiest in the world. Together, we believe they will help to build a coalition of child and youth health champions because they give the people who can make a difference in children and youth health a rallying point. The credibility and success of the Charter and the Challenge require broad, inclusive consultation and a commitment to child and youth health from society at large. The Child and Youth Health Summit, held April 25-26, 2007, was about consultation and commitment to making a difference to the health and well-being of children and youth. This document contains Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter, which was one of the focuses of the summit. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge and Canada’s Child and Youth Health Declaration, are the other components of our commitment and promise to take action for the children of Canada. These documents can be found at www.ourchildren.ca. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter In 2005, Canada’s federal, provincial and territorial governments created pan-Canadian health goals. The first of them is “Canada is a country where: Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” To reach their potential, children and youth need to grow up in a place where they can thrive — spiritually, emotionally, mentally, physically and intellectually — and get high-quality health care when they need it. That place must have three fundamental elements: a safe and secure environment; good health and development; and a full range of health resources available to all. Children and youth of distinct populations in Canada, including First Nations, Inuit and Métis, must be offered equal opportunities as other Canadian children and youth through culturally relevant resources. Canada must become: 1. A place with a safe and secure environment: a) Clean water, air and soil; b) Protection from injury, exploitation and discrimination; and c) Healthy family, homes and communities. 2. A place where children and youth can have good health and development: a) Prenatal and maternal care for the best possible health at birth; b) Nutrition for proper growth, development and long-term health; c) Early learning opportunities and high-quality care, at home and in the community; d) Opportunities and encouragement for physical activity; e) High-quality primary and secondary education; f) Affordable and available post-secondary education; and g) A commitment to social well-being and mental health. 3. A place where a full range of health resources is available: a) Basic health care including immunization, drugs and dental health; b) Mental health care and early help programs for children and youth; c) Timely access to specialty diagnostic and health services; d) Measurement and tracking the health of children and youth; e) Research that focuses on the needs of children and youth; and f) Uninterrupted care as youth move to adult health services and between acute, chronic and community care, as well as between jurisdictions. NOTES 1. The principles of this charter apply to all children and youth in Canada regardless of race, ethnicity, creed, language, gender, physical ability, mental ability, cultural history, or life experience. 2. Principles enshrined in all the goal statements include: a. Universality: The charter applies equally to all children and youth residing in Canada and covers all children and youth from 0-18 years of age. b. Without financial burden: All children and youth in Canada should have access to required health care, health services and drugs regardless of ability to pay. c. Barrier-free access: All children and youth, regardless of ability or circumstance should have appropriate access to optimal health care and health services. d. Measurement and monitoring: Appropriate resources will be available for adequate ongoing collection of data on issues that affect child and youth health and development. e. Safe and secure communities: Communities in Canada must create an environment for children and youth to grow that is safe and secure. 3. The purpose of this charter is to facilitate development of specific goals, objectives, actions and advocacy that will measurably improve child and youth health throughout Canada. 4. Success will be identified as simple, measurable, achievable, and timely goals and objectives for each of the 16 statements in this charter. 5. The initial draft of this charter has been developed by Canada’s physicians focusing on what they can best do to improve child and youth health; however, the support and participation of all individuals and groups interested in child and youth health is encouraged and desired. 6. The primary audience for actions and advocacy arising from this charter will be governments, agencies or individuals who, by virtue of legislation, regulation or policy have the ability to effect change for children and youth. 7. This charter is not a legal document; it represents a commitment by champions of child and youth health in Canada to the health and well-being of all children and youth in Canada. Charter Endorsers The following organizations have endorsed the Child and Youth Health Charter, as of October 9, 2007. Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada Breakfast for Learning Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres Canadian Child and Youth Health Coalition Canadian Healthcare Association Canadian Institute of Child Health Canadian Medical Association Canadian Paediatric Society Canadian Pharmacists Association Canadian Psychological Association Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development Centre for Science in the Public Interest College of Family Physicians of Canada Landon Pearson Resource Centre for the Study of Childhood and Children's Rights Muttart Foundation National Alliance for Children and Youth National Anti-Poverty Organization Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association Paediatric Chairs of Canada Safe Kids Canada, The National Injury Prevention Program of The Hospital for Sick Children Silken's ActiveKids Movement and Silken and Company Productions The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
Documents
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License fees for medical procedures and technology

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy689
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-03-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-06-140
That the Canadian Medical Association in consultations with Industry Canada and Health Canada, consider the issue of industry enforcing payments (license fees) from physicians for use of medical procedures or technology.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-03-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-06-140
That the Canadian Medical Association in consultations with Industry Canada and Health Canada, consider the issue of industry enforcing payments (license fees) from physicians for use of medical procedures or technology.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association in consultations with Industry Canada and Health Canada, consider the issue of industry enforcing payments (license fees) from physicians for use of medical procedures or technology.
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Guiding principles for negotiations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy691
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-196
That the Canadian Medical Association, in consultation with its Divisions, develop a set of guiding principles for negotiations, applicable for use by all Divisions, thereby introducing a consistency and national authority in the approach to negotiations by the Divisions.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-196
That the Canadian Medical Association, in consultation with its Divisions, develop a set of guiding principles for negotiations, applicable for use by all Divisions, thereby introducing a consistency and national authority in the approach to negotiations by the Divisions.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association, in consultation with its Divisions, develop a set of guiding principles for negotiations, applicable for use by all Divisions, thereby introducing a consistency and national authority in the approach to negotiations by the Divisions.
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Physician pension plan

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy692
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-198
That the Canadian Medical Association investigate in principle the feasibility of developing a national physician-owned and operated voluntary pension plan.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-198
That the Canadian Medical Association investigate in principle the feasibility of developing a national physician-owned and operated voluntary pension plan.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association investigate in principle the feasibility of developing a national physician-owned and operated voluntary pension plan.
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Canada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy694
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-12-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD97-03-118
That the Canadian Medical Association continue its discussions with the Federal Government to influence Provincial Governments to comply with the lawful provisions of Sections 11 and 12 of the Canada Health Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-12-07
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD97-03-118
That the Canadian Medical Association continue its discussions with the Federal Government to influence Provincial Governments to comply with the lawful provisions of Sections 11 and 12 of the Canada Health Act.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association continue its discussions with the Federal Government to influence Provincial Governments to comply with the lawful provisions of Sections 11 and 12 of the Canada Health Act.
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Monitoring health care access and quality indicators

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy760
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC96-19
That the Canadian Medical Association insist that appropriate mechanisms for objective monitoring of access and quality indicators and benchmarks for national standards be developed by providers, governments and consumers to track identified areas of perceived deterioration in access to quality of health care.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-08-21
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC96-19
That the Canadian Medical Association insist that appropriate mechanisms for objective monitoring of access and quality indicators and benchmarks for national standards be developed by providers, governments and consumers to track identified areas of perceived deterioration in access to quality of health care.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association insist that appropriate mechanisms for objective monitoring of access and quality indicators and benchmarks for national standards be developed by providers, governments and consumers to track identified areas of perceived deterioration in access to quality of health care.
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Definition of women's health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy771
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-202
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the following definition of women's health and use it to guide the association's work in this area: Women's health involves women's emotional, social, cultural, spiritual and physical well-being, and it is determined by the social, political and economic context of women's lives as well as by biology.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1996-05-04
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD96-08-202
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the following definition of women's health and use it to guide the association's work in this area: Women's health involves women's emotional, social, cultural, spiritual and physical well-being, and it is determined by the social, political and economic context of women's lives as well as by biology.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association endorse the following definition of women's health and use it to guide the association's work in this area: Women's health involves women's emotional, social, cultural, spiritual and physical well-being, and it is determined by the social, political and economic context of women's lives as well as by biology.
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Nutrition counseling

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy784
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC75-19
That, recognizing the importance of comprehensive nutrition counselling services, the Canadian Medical Association urge that such services be made widely available within the framework of the health care system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC75-19
That, recognizing the importance of comprehensive nutrition counselling services, the Canadian Medical Association urge that such services be made widely available within the framework of the health care system.
Text
That, recognizing the importance of comprehensive nutrition counselling services, the Canadian Medical Association urge that such services be made widely available within the framework of the health care system.
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Noise pollution

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy787
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC75-34
The Canadian Medical Association, recognizing that noise pollution is a significant and increasing health hazard in the work and home environments of most Canadians, calls on all levels of government to delineate, legislate, monitor and enforce laws on the question of noise.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1975-06-25
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC75-34
The Canadian Medical Association, recognizing that noise pollution is a significant and increasing health hazard in the work and home environments of most Canadians, calls on all levels of government to delineate, legislate, monitor and enforce laws on the question of noise.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, recognizing that noise pollution is a significant and increasing health hazard in the work and home environments of most Canadians, calls on all levels of government to delineate, legislate, monitor and enforce laws on the question of noise.
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46 records – page 1 of 5.