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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


9 records – page 1 of 1.

All-terrain vehicles

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy719
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
1989-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC89-46
That the Canadian Medical Association recommend: a) that the federal departments of transport and consumer and corporate affairs enact legislation for the purpose of setting national safety standards for all-terrain vehicles, b) that provincial governments be urged to review and strengthen regulations related to the use of all-terrain vehicles, c) that provincial governments be urged to introduce a specific driver's licence category for all-terrain vehicle drivers; such licence would require demonstrating competence in handling the vehicle.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
1989-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC89-46
That the Canadian Medical Association recommend: a) that the federal departments of transport and consumer and corporate affairs enact legislation for the purpose of setting national safety standards for all-terrain vehicles, b) that provincial governments be urged to review and strengthen regulations related to the use of all-terrain vehicles, c) that provincial governments be urged to introduce a specific driver's licence category for all-terrain vehicle drivers; such licence would require demonstrating competence in handling the vehicle.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association recommend: a) that the federal departments of transport and consumer and corporate affairs enact legislation for the purpose of setting national safety standards for all-terrain vehicles, b) that provincial governments be urged to review and strengthen regulations related to the use of all-terrain vehicles, c) that provincial governments be urged to introduce a specific driver's licence category for all-terrain vehicle drivers; such licence would require demonstrating competence in handling the vehicle.
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Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-81
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-81
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
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Health Canada’s consultation on new health-related labelling for tobacco products

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13939
Date
2018-12-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Response to consultation
Date
2018-12-14
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide this submission in response to Health Canada’s Consultation on “New Health-Related Labelling for Tobacco Products - Document for Consultation, October 2018”. Canada's physicians have been working for decades toward the goal of a smoke-free Canada. The CMA issued its first public warning concerning the hazards of tobacco in 1954 and has continued to advocate for the strongest possible measures to control its use and for the past 30 years we have reiterated our long-standing support for the concept of tobacco products being sold in standardized packages in several briefs and policy statements. Our response will follow the questions posed in the consultation document. Labelling on Individual Cigarettes Displaying a warning on individual cigarettes provides another means of conveying important health warnings about the hazards of smoking. The warnings should be like those that will be displayed on the leaflets included in the cigarette packages as well as the packages themselves. They should be of sufficient size, font and colour that will draw the attention of the smoker to the message. They should also be placed as close to the filter end of the cigarette as possible to remain visible for as long as possible. Health Information Messages The CMA has always supported educational and public health initiatives aimed at countering tobacco manufacturers messages that would render smoking attractive and glamorous to their customers. The health information messages and any leaflets included in the package must be of sufficient size, colour and font to prevent manufacturers from using the leaflet as any sort of a promotional platform to minimize, for example, the impact of health warnings on the package exterior. The CMA supports strongly the concept of tobacco products being sold in standardized packages and we have recommended that only the “slide-and-shell” style of package be authorized and that the “flip-top” package be removed. This would allow for the largest possible surface area to be used to convey health warnings and other health-related information. The CMA has recommended that the measurements for the regular and king size cigarette packages be amended to allow for more surface area for warnings and to standardize packaging regulations across all Canadian jurisdictions. Toxic Statements (Includes Toxic Emissions Statements and Toxic Constituents Statements) The size, colour and design of new Toxic Statements proposed in the consultation document should be sufficient to be read and easily understood. The Statements should be rotated periodically to include new and updated information related to emissions and toxic constituents. Connecting Labelling Elements/ Quitline Information Tobacco manufacturers make frequent use of subtle marketing messages to render smoking attractive and glamorous, especially to young people. The CMA supports packages displaying prominent, simple and powerful health warnings, such as the graphic pictorial warnings, as well as quit tips and information on product content and health risks.2 Connecting the themes should help to reinforce the messages being conveyed with these labels. The size, colour, and placement of the proposed quitline and website information should be sufficient to maximize the noticeability of the information on various types of tobacco product packaging. Percentage of Coverage/Minimum Size of Health Warnings on Tobacco Products Other than Cigarettes and Little Cigars The amount of space given to the warnings should be sufficient to convey the maximum amount of information while remaining clear, visible, and legible. The warnings should be in proportion to the packaging available, like that of a regular cigarette package. Labelling for All Tobacco Products that Do Not Currently Require Labels The CMA supports mandatory health warnings being applied equally to all tobacco products. If package size allows, Health Warnings, Health Information Messages, and Toxic Statements should all be included. The messages should be relevant to the types of tobacco products they are covering. Labelling Rotation The rotation timeframe suggested in the consultation document of 12 to 18 months is a reasonable period. Government of Canada. New Health-Related Labelling for Tobacco Products. Document for Consultation Ottawa: Health Canada; 2018. Available: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/programs/consultation-tobacco-labelling.html (accessed 2018 Oct 29). Canadian Medical Association (CMA) Tobacco Control (Update 2008). Ottawa: The Association; 2008. Available: http:// policybase.cma.ca /dbtw-wpd/Policypdf/PD08-08.pdf (accessed 2018 Dec 5). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Letter in response to Health Canada’s Consultation on “Plain and Standardized Packaging” for Tobacco Products. Potential Measures for Regulating the Appearance, Shape and Size of Tobacco Packages and of Tobacco Products. Document for Consultation. Ottawa: The Association; 2016. Available: http://policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/Briefpdf/BR2016-09.pdf (accessed 2018 Nov 19). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Health Canada Consultation on Tobacco Products Regulations (Plain and Standardized Appearance). Ottawa: The Association; 2018. Available: http://policybase.cma.ca/dbtw-wpd/Briefpdf/BR2019-01.pdf (accessed 2018 Nov 19). Canadian Medical Association (CMA). Policy Resolution BD88-03-64 - Smokeless tobacco. Ottawa: The Association; 1987. Available: https://tinyurl.com/y7eynl5q (accessed 2018 Dec 5).
Documents
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Joint Policy Statement: Sexual and Reproductive Health, Rights and Realities and Access to Services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10261
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-05-28
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD11-05-157
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) endorses the Joint Policy Statement: Sexual and Reproductive Health, Rights and Realities and Access to Services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 11-113.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-05-28
Topics
Ethics and medical professionalism
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD11-05-157
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) endorses the Joint Policy Statement: Sexual and Reproductive Health, Rights and Realities and Access to Services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 11-113.
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The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) endorses the Joint Policy Statement: Sexual and Reproductive Health, Rights and Realities and Access to Services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada as outlined in Appendix A to BD 11-113.
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Mercury emissions

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10184
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-87
The Canadian Medical Association actively advocates for: - reduction in mercury emissions from health care settings by progressively replacing its use, - promotion of health care sector leadership in the global reduction of mercury emissions, - promotion of the adoption of healthy public policies with regard to mercury.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-87
The Canadian Medical Association actively advocates for: - reduction in mercury emissions from health care settings by progressively replacing its use, - promotion of health care sector leadership in the global reduction of mercury emissions, - promotion of the adoption of healthy public policies with regard to mercury.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association actively advocates for: - reduction in mercury emissions from health care settings by progressively replacing its use, - promotion of health care sector leadership in the global reduction of mercury emissions, - promotion of the adoption of healthy public policies with regard to mercury.
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Nutrition Labelling: CMA's Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10085
Date
2011-03-03
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2011-03-03
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
Thank you very much for inviting the Canadian Medical Association back to this committee as you continue your study on healthy living. A few weeks ago my colleague Dr. Doig was here to talk about the health consequences of poor nutrition and lack of physical activity and the policies CMA has advocated to promote healthy living. Today I would like to expand upon nutrition labelling and health claims on foods, and on the labelling of foods regulated as natural health products. Nutrition facts tables can be an important source of information, but many Canadians have difficulty interpreting them. A 2009 Health Canada review of research on nutrition labelling indicated that: * those with little nutrition knowledge have difficulty using the tables and are unable to relate the information they contain to their own dietary needs; and that * the concept of percentage of daily value is often misunderstood. There has been an increase in the use of health claims on the front of packaging expressed as slogans or logos such as "healthy choice," as well as in disease reduction and nutrient content claims. Studies have shown that foods carrying health-related claims are seen by consumers as healthier choices. But the myriad of different claims can be confusing and may, in fact, draw attention away from the less healthy characteristics of a food, or oversimplify complex nutritional messages. We believe a standard consistent "at a glance" approach to front-of-package food labelling could reduce confusion and help consumers make informed dietary choices. The "traffic light" front-of-pack labelling currently in voluntary use in the UK is an example. The front-of-pack labels on composite processed foods use green, amber and red to indicate low, medium or high levels of the nutrients most strongly associated with diet-related health risks: fat, saturated fat, sugars and salt. Also included is calorie count per serving and percentage daily amount information. Research in the UK has shown that consumers generally understand these labels. Shoppers are most likely to use them when buying a product for the first time; to compare different products; when shopping for children; when trying to control intake of certain ingredients such as fat or salt, for health reasons; or when trying to lose weight. Not surprisingly, research in the UK and Canada also shows that those most likely to read nutrition labels are those who are already interested in healthy eating. For this reason, labelling policy must be embedded in a broader nutrition policy that uses multiple instruments to foster education and interest in healthy eating, and helps ensure that Canadians have healthy food choices by, for example, regulating amounts of salt in processed food. In addition, physicians have become quite concerned about a recent tendency toward regulating 'fortified foods 'as Natural Health Products. The Food and Drugs Act effectively prevents products classified as foods from being marketed as having medicinal benefits unless there is compelling scientific evidence that the claims are true and the products are safe. The same strong legislation does not apply to Natural Health Products (NHPs), which are regulated under a different act. This is a concern because a trend is emerging whereby manufacturers of products normally sold as foods fortify their products with approved natural health products such as vitamins or minerals. Examples of these are energy drinks and vitamin-enhanced juice, power bars, gums and candy. The manufacturer can then request federal approval to market the product as a 'health product in food format.' If approved, food labelling requirements no longer apply and health claims that would not be allowed under the Food and Drugs Act can be made. Without proper nutrition labelling, it is difficult, if not impossible, for consumers to make informed food choices. This can be particularly troubling for those with special diets or health concerns. Further, those misled by dubious health claims might be consuming empty calories or high amounts of fat or sodium, with no corresponding benefit. The result is that the health of Canadians may be compromised. The CMA has called on Health Canada to require compelling evidence of health benefits before changing a product's regulatory status from food to natural health product, and nutrition labelling for all foods regulated as a natural health product. Faced with an array of products and health claims, and a barrage of advertising extolling their benefits, Canadians can find it challenging to make healthier food choices. To find our way through to the right choice, we need good nutritional information, and the ability to access and understand this information. Governments and health care providers share a responsibility to help Canadians make choices that will help them achieve and maintain good health. Canada's doctors are partners in healthy living and are ready to work with governments and others toward a healthy population. I welcome your questions.
Documents
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Pets on airplanes

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10193
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-80
The Canadian Medical Association recommends a ban on all pets, except for certified service animals, travelling inside the aircraft cabin on all Canadian passenger planes.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-80
The Canadian Medical Association recommends a ban on all pets, except for certified service animals, travelling inside the aircraft cabin on all Canadian passenger planes.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends a ban on all pets, except for certified service animals, travelling inside the aircraft cabin on all Canadian passenger planes.
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Smoking cessation interventions

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10192
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-68
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a national training initiative for health care providers that targets smoking cessation interventions for people with serious mental illness.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-68
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a national training initiative for health care providers that targets smoking cessation interventions for people with serious mental illness.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports development of a national training initiative for health care providers that targets smoking cessation interventions for people with serious mental illness.
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Timely access to hospitalization in Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10201
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-91
The Canadian Medical Association supports timely access to hospitalization in Canada for Canadians who have become ill or been injured while travelling outside Canada.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-91
The Canadian Medical Association supports timely access to hospitalization in Canada for Canadians who have become ill or been injured while travelling outside Canada.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports timely access to hospitalization in Canada for Canadians who have become ill or been injured while travelling outside Canada.
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9 records – page 1 of 1.