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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


59 records – page 1 of 6.

Access to a family physician

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9534
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-29
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations (PTMAs) to urge governments to collaborate with PTMAs in the implementation of a program that will identify and manage "orphan" patients who do not have access to a family physician.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-29
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations (PTMAs) to urge governments to collaborate with PTMAs in the implementation of a program that will identify and manage "orphan" patients who do not have access to a family physician.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations (PTMAs) to urge governments to collaborate with PTMAs in the implementation of a program that will identify and manage "orphan" patients who do not have access to a family physician.
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Access to long-term care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9500
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC09-19
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates, will communicate to governments that insufficient access to long-term care at all ages is an obstacle to improving the health care system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC09-19
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates, will communicate to governments that insufficient access to long-term care at all ages is an obstacle to improving the health care system.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates, will communicate to governments that insufficient access to long-term care at all ages is an obstacle to improving the health care system.
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Access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8877
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-66
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-66
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to promote access to safe and nutritious food for children in northern communities affected by disruptions in traditional food-acquisition methods and a shift to a more processed low-nutrient diet.
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Active Transportation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9483
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2009-05-31
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2009-05-31
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The major diseases affecting the quality and quantity of life of Canadians, which include obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease, depression and cancer, are all linked to physical inactivity. In Canada, 69% of women and 68% of men in Canada are considered physically inactive.(1) The cost of this inactivity and obesity was estimated at $4.3 billion in 2001.(2) A 10% increase in physical activity could potentially reduce direct health care expenditures by $150 million a year. This does not include indirect costs such as lost productivity due to illness, premature death or a range of other factors, including mental illness and poor quality of life.(3) Thus far, efforts to increase physical activity by changing the behaviour of individuals have had limited success. One reason is that many people have difficulty sustaining behaviours that involve additional time commitments. That is one reason for the increasing emphasis being placed on active transportation, which is any human-powered form of transportation, such as walking and cycling. Walking and cycling can be efficient alternatives to automobile travel. Cycling is usually the fastest mode of travel door to door for distances under five km, and for up to 10 km in city cores. Walking is simpler and nearly as fast for distances up to two km. When travel times are similar for active and motorized transportation, physical activity is gained with no net time lost, and at much lower cost. The cost of operating a motor vehicle is typically $10,000 per year,(4) while operating costs for a bicycle are much lower. Communities that have sidewalks, enjoyable scenery, street lights and nearby stores have improved levels of active transportation and physical activity. However, in recent decades communities have often been designed around the automobile. Street design, parking space, sidewalks and distance to retail destinations have all been planned assuming motorized transportation, and this often makes it difficult to move around communities by walking or cycling. Although individual decision-making remains important in any strategy for increasing active transportation, there is an essential role for communities and governments to play. Major improvements in the health of Canadians in the past 200 years have been due to improved sanitation, access to clean water and injury prevention. The role of individual decision-making in effecting these changes is dwarfed by the impact of the public health measures and infrastructure involved. Just as potable tap water is a health issue, so are decisions about land use, transportation policy and infrastructure. Community design is a major determinant of whether people use active transportation, whether they are physically active and whether they are obese. Canadians need communities that make it easy to be physically active in their daily living. Communities can create an environment in which the physically active choice is the easy choice. They can do this via sidewalks, trails, bicycle lanes and bicycle paths, and by providing pedestrian-friendly intersections, parks and green spaces, and safe bicycle parking spaces. They can also arrange zoning so that retail destinations are within walking or cycling distance of residential areas. This process also includes dedicating a sufficient portion of their street maintenance budget (including snow clearing) to maintaining active transportation routes as well as routes for motorized vehicles. It may include redesigning intersections, giving up vehicle lanes or parking spaces, or increasing the price of parking. Additional benefits to designing communities for pedestrians and cyclists. * a stronger sense of community with greater civic involvement by citizens * increased property values and retail activity * less noise pollution * lower crime rates * less smog and other air pollution * less greenhouse gas production * decreased risk of injury to pedestrians and cyclists * decreased costs of roadway and parking construction. A role for everyone Other sectors can support communities in making active transportation choices easy choices: * Businesses can create a work environment friendly to active transportation, including a corporate culture friendly to physical activity. They can incorporate active transportation planning into building design and create an environment friendly to physical activity. These steps could include making bicycle parking, showers and lockers available, and providing stairs that are pleasant and easier to access than elevators. They can also incorporate a culture of physical activity in decisions about where and how to hold meetings, and what people are allowed to wear to work. * School boards can develop policies to promote active transportation to and from school. These include building and maintaining secure bicycle parking, ensuring safe walking routes within communities, and assisting parents in walking their children to school. * Citizens can use active transportation themselves and treat with respect those who are already making active transportation choices. They can also lobby governments to make their community safer and easier places for cycling and walking. * Physicians can encourage patients to use active transportation as a way to boost their physical activity levels and improving their health. They can also lead by example and use active transportation themselves. Recommendations The CMA recommends that all sectors (government, business and the public) work together, as a matter of priority, to create a culture in their communities that supports and encourages active transportation. The CMA urges governments to: * Commit to long-term plans for active transportation networks that are in keeping with these goals and that include specific benchmarks to measure progress. * Require that active transportation be part of all infrastructure renewal projects, with investment in active transportation vs. motorized transportation in proportion to targeted active transportation use. (Some cities have achieved active transportation rates of up to 15%.) * Develop an awareness campaign to help Canadians to recognize the value of active transportation in their communities. * Require public health impact assessments for all land-use and transportation decisions, including the impact on the chemical environment and on physical activity. * Assess the impact that changes in the "built" environment can have on public health, and which interventions are most safe and effective. 1 Tremblay MS, Katzmarzyk PT, Willms JD. Temporal trends in overweight and obesity in Canada, 1981-1996. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2002;26(4):538-43. 2 Katzmarzyk PT, Janssen I. The economic costs associated with physical inactivity and obesity in Canada: an update. Can J App Phys 2004;29(1):104. 3 Katzmarzyk PT, Gledhill N, Shephard RJ. The economic burden of physical inactivity in Canada. CMAJ 2000;163(11): 1435-40. 4 Canadian Automobile Association. Driving Costs: 2005 Edition. Available: www.carpool.ca/pdf/CAA-driving-costs-05.pdf (accessed 2007 Feb. 2).
Documents
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Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Less detail
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-76
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to improve the quality of the air that Canadians breathe by strengthening initiatives to reduce domestic air pollution emissions and advocating strongly for emission reductions in bordering American states.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-76
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to improve the quality of the air that Canadians breathe by strengthening initiatives to reduce domestic air pollution emissions and advocating strongly for emission reductions in bordering American states.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to improve the quality of the air that Canadians breathe by strengthening initiatives to reduce domestic air pollution emissions and advocating strongly for emission reductions in bordering American states.
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Blood Pressure Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8922
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-108
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to adopt the recommendations of Hypertension Canada aimed at reducing adult Canadians' sodium intake to between 1200 - 2300 mg per day by Jan. 1, 2020.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-108
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to adopt the recommendations of Hypertension Canada aimed at reducing adult Canadians' sodium intake to between 1200 - 2300 mg per day by Jan. 1, 2020.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to adopt the recommendations of Hypertension Canada aimed at reducing adult Canadians' sodium intake to between 1200 - 2300 mg per day by Jan. 1, 2020.
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Canada Extended Health Services Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8840
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-10
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-10
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
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Canada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8856
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-26
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-26
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
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Canada’s child and youth health charter

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10327
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
CHILD AND YOUTH HEALTH IN CANADA THEIR CHARTER — OUR CHALLENGE “There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way it treats its children.” Nelson Mandela “One generation plants the trees; another gets the shade.” Chinese Proverb Children and youth have always been a priority for the doctors of Canada — the Child and Youth Health Initiative of the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Paediatric Society and the College of Family Physicians of Canada is evidence of that. We three organizations joined together in November 2006 to launch the Child and Youth Health Initiative. In September 2004, Canada’s first ministers committed to “improving the health status of Canadians through a collaborative process.” This led to an agreement on health goals for Canada. The first of them is “Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” At the international level, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child sets out the wider rights of all children and young people, including the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. We now owe it to our children and youth to develop tangible health goals and targets. From the outset of the partnership, we were acutely aware that only a broad societal coalition could achieve the overarching goal of excellence in child and youth health in Canada. Making the health of children and youth a national priority requires a coalition of child and youth health champions, including governments, parents, health providers, businesses, schools, teachers and communities. To start that process, we created Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter. An action framework was then developed called Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge because a charter alone will not deliver on the vision of the children and youth of Canada being among the healthiest in the world. Together, we believe they will help to build a coalition of child and youth health champions because they give the people who can make a difference in children and youth health a rallying point. The credibility and success of the Charter and the Challenge require broad, inclusive consultation and a commitment to child and youth health from society at large. The Child and Youth Health Summit, held April 25-26, 2007, was about consultation and commitment to making a difference to the health and well-being of children and youth. This document contains Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter, which was one of the focuses of the summit. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge and Canada’s Child and Youth Health Declaration, are the other components of our commitment and promise to take action for the children of Canada. These documents can be found at www.ourchildren.ca. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter In 2005, Canada’s federal, provincial and territorial governments created pan-Canadian health goals. The first of them is “Canada is a country where: Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” To reach their potential, children and youth need to grow up in a place where they can thrive — spiritually, emotionally, mentally, physically and intellectually — and get high-quality health care when they need it. That place must have three fundamental elements: a safe and secure environment; good health and development; and a full range of health resources available to all. Children and youth of distinct populations in Canada, including First Nations, Inuit and Métis, must be offered equal opportunities as other Canadian children and youth through culturally relevant resources. Canada must become: 1. A place with a safe and secure environment: a) Clean water, air and soil; b) Protection from injury, exploitation and discrimination; and c) Healthy family, homes and communities. 2. A place where children and youth can have good health and development: a) Prenatal and maternal care for the best possible health at birth; b) Nutrition for proper growth, development and long-term health; c) Early learning opportunities and high-quality care, at home and in the community; d) Opportunities and encouragement for physical activity; e) High-quality primary and secondary education; f) Affordable and available post-secondary education; and g) A commitment to social well-being and mental health. 3. A place where a full range of health resources is available: a) Basic health care including immunization, drugs and dental health; b) Mental health care and early help programs for children and youth; c) Timely access to specialty diagnostic and health services; d) Measurement and tracking the health of children and youth; e) Research that focuses on the needs of children and youth; and f) Uninterrupted care as youth move to adult health services and between acute, chronic and community care, as well as between jurisdictions. NOTES 1. The principles of this charter apply to all children and youth in Canada regardless of race, ethnicity, creed, language, gender, physical ability, mental ability, cultural history, or life experience. 2. Principles enshrined in all the goal statements include: a. Universality: The charter applies equally to all children and youth residing in Canada and covers all children and youth from 0-18 years of age. b. Without financial burden: All children and youth in Canada should have access to required health care, health services and drugs regardless of ability to pay. c. Barrier-free access: All children and youth, regardless of ability or circumstance should have appropriate access to optimal health care and health services. d. Measurement and monitoring: Appropriate resources will be available for adequate ongoing collection of data on issues that affect child and youth health and development. e. Safe and secure communities: Communities in Canada must create an environment for children and youth to grow that is safe and secure. 3. The purpose of this charter is to facilitate development of specific goals, objectives, actions and advocacy that will measurably improve child and youth health throughout Canada. 4. Success will be identified as simple, measurable, achievable, and timely goals and objectives for each of the 16 statements in this charter. 5. The initial draft of this charter has been developed by Canada’s physicians focusing on what they can best do to improve child and youth health; however, the support and participation of all individuals and groups interested in child and youth health is encouraged and desired. 6. The primary audience for actions and advocacy arising from this charter will be governments, agencies or individuals who, by virtue of legislation, regulation or policy have the ability to effect change for children and youth. 7. This charter is not a legal document; it represents a commitment by champions of child and youth health in Canada to the health and well-being of all children and youth in Canada. Charter Endorsers The following organizations have endorsed the Child and Youth Health Charter, as of October 9, 2007. Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada Breakfast for Learning Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres Canadian Child and Youth Health Coalition Canadian Healthcare Association Canadian Institute of Child Health Canadian Medical Association Canadian Paediatric Society Canadian Pharmacists Association Canadian Psychological Association Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development Centre for Science in the Public Interest College of Family Physicians of Canada Landon Pearson Resource Centre for the Study of Childhood and Children's Rights Muttart Foundation National Alliance for Children and Youth National Anti-Poverty Organization Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association Paediatric Chairs of Canada Safe Kids Canada, The National Injury Prevention Program of The Hospital for Sick Children Silken's ActiveKids Movement and Silken and Company Productions The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
Documents
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59 records – page 1 of 6.