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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


32 records – page 1 of 4.

Access to a family physician

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9534
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-29
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations (PTMAs) to urge governments to collaborate with PTMAs in the implementation of a program that will identify and manage "orphan" patients who do not have access to a family physician.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health human resources
Health systems, system funding and performance
Physician practice/ compensation/ forms
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-29
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations (PTMAs) to urge governments to collaborate with PTMAs in the implementation of a program that will identify and manage "orphan" patients who do not have access to a family physician.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will work with provincial/territorial medical associations (PTMAs) to urge governments to collaborate with PTMAs in the implementation of a program that will identify and manage "orphan" patients who do not have access to a family physician.
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Access to long-term care

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9500
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC09-19
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates, will communicate to governments that insufficient access to long-term care at all ages is an obstacle to improving the health care system.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC09-19
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates, will communicate to governments that insufficient access to long-term care at all ages is an obstacle to improving the health care system.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association, in collaboration with provincial/territorial medical associations, affiliates and associates, will communicate to governments that insufficient access to long-term care at all ages is an obstacle to improving the health care system.
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Active Transportation

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9483
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2009-05-31
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy document
Last Reviewed
2020-02-29
Date
2009-05-31
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The major diseases affecting the quality and quantity of life of Canadians, which include obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease, depression and cancer, are all linked to physical inactivity. In Canada, 69% of women and 68% of men in Canada are considered physically inactive.(1) The cost of this inactivity and obesity was estimated at $4.3 billion in 2001.(2) A 10% increase in physical activity could potentially reduce direct health care expenditures by $150 million a year. This does not include indirect costs such as lost productivity due to illness, premature death or a range of other factors, including mental illness and poor quality of life.(3) Thus far, efforts to increase physical activity by changing the behaviour of individuals have had limited success. One reason is that many people have difficulty sustaining behaviours that involve additional time commitments. That is one reason for the increasing emphasis being placed on active transportation, which is any human-powered form of transportation, such as walking and cycling. Walking and cycling can be efficient alternatives to automobile travel. Cycling is usually the fastest mode of travel door to door for distances under five km, and for up to 10 km in city cores. Walking is simpler and nearly as fast for distances up to two km. When travel times are similar for active and motorized transportation, physical activity is gained with no net time lost, and at much lower cost. The cost of operating a motor vehicle is typically $10,000 per year,(4) while operating costs for a bicycle are much lower. Communities that have sidewalks, enjoyable scenery, street lights and nearby stores have improved levels of active transportation and physical activity. However, in recent decades communities have often been designed around the automobile. Street design, parking space, sidewalks and distance to retail destinations have all been planned assuming motorized transportation, and this often makes it difficult to move around communities by walking or cycling. Although individual decision-making remains important in any strategy for increasing active transportation, there is an essential role for communities and governments to play. Major improvements in the health of Canadians in the past 200 years have been due to improved sanitation, access to clean water and injury prevention. The role of individual decision-making in effecting these changes is dwarfed by the impact of the public health measures and infrastructure involved. Just as potable tap water is a health issue, so are decisions about land use, transportation policy and infrastructure. Community design is a major determinant of whether people use active transportation, whether they are physically active and whether they are obese. Canadians need communities that make it easy to be physically active in their daily living. Communities can create an environment in which the physically active choice is the easy choice. They can do this via sidewalks, trails, bicycle lanes and bicycle paths, and by providing pedestrian-friendly intersections, parks and green spaces, and safe bicycle parking spaces. They can also arrange zoning so that retail destinations are within walking or cycling distance of residential areas. This process also includes dedicating a sufficient portion of their street maintenance budget (including snow clearing) to maintaining active transportation routes as well as routes for motorized vehicles. It may include redesigning intersections, giving up vehicle lanes or parking spaces, or increasing the price of parking. Additional benefits to designing communities for pedestrians and cyclists. * a stronger sense of community with greater civic involvement by citizens * increased property values and retail activity * less noise pollution * lower crime rates * less smog and other air pollution * less greenhouse gas production * decreased risk of injury to pedestrians and cyclists * decreased costs of roadway and parking construction. A role for everyone Other sectors can support communities in making active transportation choices easy choices: * Businesses can create a work environment friendly to active transportation, including a corporate culture friendly to physical activity. They can incorporate active transportation planning into building design and create an environment friendly to physical activity. These steps could include making bicycle parking, showers and lockers available, and providing stairs that are pleasant and easier to access than elevators. They can also incorporate a culture of physical activity in decisions about where and how to hold meetings, and what people are allowed to wear to work. * School boards can develop policies to promote active transportation to and from school. These include building and maintaining secure bicycle parking, ensuring safe walking routes within communities, and assisting parents in walking their children to school. * Citizens can use active transportation themselves and treat with respect those who are already making active transportation choices. They can also lobby governments to make their community safer and easier places for cycling and walking. * Physicians can encourage patients to use active transportation as a way to boost their physical activity levels and improving their health. They can also lead by example and use active transportation themselves. Recommendations The CMA recommends that all sectors (government, business and the public) work together, as a matter of priority, to create a culture in their communities that supports and encourages active transportation. The CMA urges governments to: * Commit to long-term plans for active transportation networks that are in keeping with these goals and that include specific benchmarks to measure progress. * Require that active transportation be part of all infrastructure renewal projects, with investment in active transportation vs. motorized transportation in proportion to targeted active transportation use. (Some cities have achieved active transportation rates of up to 15%.) * Develop an awareness campaign to help Canadians to recognize the value of active transportation in their communities. * Require public health impact assessments for all land-use and transportation decisions, including the impact on the chemical environment and on physical activity. * Assess the impact that changes in the "built" environment can have on public health, and which interventions are most safe and effective. 1 Tremblay MS, Katzmarzyk PT, Willms JD. Temporal trends in overweight and obesity in Canada, 1981-1996. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2002;26(4):538-43. 2 Katzmarzyk PT, Janssen I. The economic costs associated with physical inactivity and obesity in Canada: an update. Can J App Phys 2004;29(1):104. 3 Katzmarzyk PT, Gledhill N, Shephard RJ. The economic burden of physical inactivity in Canada. CMAJ 2000;163(11): 1435-40. 4 Canadian Automobile Association. Driving Costs: 2005 Edition. Available: www.carpool.ca/pdf/CAA-driving-costs-05.pdf (accessed 2007 Feb. 2).
Documents
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Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2016-05-20
Date
2009-08-19
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC09-92
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes addiction as a chronic, treatable disease and urges that it be included in national and provincial/territorial efforts to improve chronic disease management.
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Bicycle helmets

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy738
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC92-41
a) That the Canadian Medical Association require the use of bicycle helmets at all activities that it sponsors or supports involving the use of bicycles, b) That the Canadian Medical Association recommend to its divisions that they require the use of bicycle helmets at all activities that they sponsor or support involving the use of bicycles.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC92-41
a) That the Canadian Medical Association require the use of bicycle helmets at all activities that it sponsors or supports involving the use of bicycles, b) That the Canadian Medical Association recommend to its divisions that they require the use of bicycle helmets at all activities that they sponsor or support involving the use of bicycles.
Text
a) That the Canadian Medical Association require the use of bicycle helmets at all activities that it sponsors or supports involving the use of bicycles, b) That the Canadian Medical Association recommend to its divisions that they require the use of bicycle helmets at all activities that they sponsor or support involving the use of bicycles.
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Breastfeeding and HIV

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy737
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC92-34
Where safe alternatives exist, breast feeding should be avoided by mothers at high risk for HIV [human immunodeficiency virus] infection and by those known to be infected.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-08-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC92-34
Where safe alternatives exist, breast feeding should be avoided by mothers at high risk for HIV [human immunodeficiency virus] infection and by those known to be infected.
Text
Where safe alternatives exist, breast feeding should be avoided by mothers at high risk for HIV [human immunodeficiency virus] infection and by those known to be infected.
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Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-81
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2011-08-24
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC11-81
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will educate and advise the profession and the public on methods of cellphone operation that will minimize radio frequency penetration to the brain.
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Chronic Diseases Related to Aging: CMA's Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10226
Date
2011-10-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2011-10-17
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association wishes to commend the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health for undertaking this study of the issue of chronic diseases related to aging. It is a timely issue, since the first members of the Baby Boom generation turned 65 in 2011 and it's predicted that by 2031 a quarter of Canada's population will be 65 or older. Though chronic disease is not exclusive to seniors, its prevalence does rise with age: according to Statistics Canada, about 74% of Canadians over 65 have at least one chronic condition such as diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis or depression and nearly 25% have three or more. The proportion is higher among people 85 years old and over. What are the causes of chronic disease? There are many. Some of them are rooted in unhealthy behaviour: smoking, poor nutrition and, in particular, lack of physical activity. Physicians are concerned about rising obesity rates in Canada, for example, because obesity increases one's risk of developing chronic diseases later in life. But there is more to chronic disease than unhealthy behaviour. It is also affected by a person's biological and genetic makeup, as well as by his or her social environment. Lower income and educational levels, poor housing, and social isolation, which is a greater problem for seniors than for other populations, are all associated with poorer health status. Now the good news: chronic disease is not an inevitable consequence of aging. We can delay the onset of chronic disease, and perhaps even reduce the risk that it will occur. Patients who do have existing chronic disease, their conditions can often be controlled successfully through appropriate health care and disease management, so that they can continue to lead active, independent lives. Thus the CMA supports initiatives promoting healthy aging - which the Public Health Agency of Canada defines as "the process of optimizing opportunities for physical, mental and social health as people age." Healthy lifestyles should be encouraged at any age. For example, the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines, which CMA supports, recommend that people 65 or older accumulate at least two-and-a-half hours per week of aerobic activity such as walking, swimming or cycling. Experts believe that healthy aging will compress a person's period of illness and disability into a short period just prior to death, enabling a longer period of healthy, independent and fulfilling life. For those who are already affected with chronic diseases, treatment is long term and can be very complex. People with diabetes, for example, need a continuous ongoing program to monitor their blood sugar levels and maintain them at an appropriate level; people with arthritis or other mobility problems may require regular physical therapy. For the patient, chronic disease means a long-term management that is much more complicated than taking antibiotics for an infection. People with two or more chronic conditions may be consulting a different specialist for each, as well as seeking support from nurse counsellors, dieticians, pharmacists, occupational therapists, social workers or other health professionals. Often, management requires medication. The majority of Canadians over 65 take at least one prescription drug, and nearly 15% are on five drugs or more, which increases the possibility that, for example, two of those drugs could interact negatively with each other to produce unpleasant and possibly serious side effects. Long-term, complex chronic disease care is in fact the new paradigm in our health care system. About 80% of the care now provided in the United States is for chronic diseases, and there is no reason to believe Canada is greatly different. Hence, it is worth considering what form, ideally, a comprehensive program of chronic disease management should take, for patients of any age. The CMA believes it should include the following four elements: * First, access to a primary care provider who has responsibility for the overall care of the patient. For more than 30 million Canadians, that primary care provider is a family physician. Family physicians who have established long-standing professional relationships with their patients, can better understand their needs and preferences. They can build a relationship of trust, so that patients are comfortable in discussing frankly how they want to treat their conditions: for example, whether to take medication for depression or seek counselling with a therapist. The family physician can also serve as a co-ordinator of the care delivered by other providers. This leads to our second recommended element: * Collaborative and coordinated care. The CMA believes that, given the number of providers who may be involved in the care of chronic diseases, the health care system should encourage the creation of interdisciplinary teams or, at minimum, enable a high level of communication and coordination among individual providers. We believe all governments should support: o Interdisciplinary primary care practices, such as Family Health Networks in Ontario, which bring a variety of different health professionals and their expertise into one practice setting; o Widespread use of the electronic health record, which can facilitate information sharing and communication among providers; and o A smooth process for referral: for example, from family physician to specialists, or from family physician to physiotherapist. The CMA is working with other medical stakeholders to create a referral process tool kit that governments, health care organizations and practitioners can use to support the development of more effective and efficient referral systems. The patient may also need non-medical support services to help cope with disability related to chronic disease. For example, a person with arthritis who wants to remain at home may need to have grab bars, ramps or stair lifts installed there. Ideally, a coordinated system of chronic disease management would also include referral to those who could provide these services. * The third necessary element is support for informal caregivers. These are the unsung heroes of elder care. An estimated four million Canadians are providing informal, unpaid care to family members or friends. About a quarter of these caregivers are themselves 65 or older. Their burden can be a heavy one, in terms of both time and expense. Stress and isolation are common among caregivers. The federal government has taken steps to provide much-needed support to informal caregivers. The most recent federal budget, for example, increased the amount of its Caregiver Tax Credit. We recommend that the government build on these actions, to provide a solid network of support, financial and otherwise, to informal caregivers. * The fourth and final element is improving access to necessary services. Only physician and hospital services are covered through the Canada Health Act, and many other services are not. All provinces have pharmacare programs for people over 65, but coverage varies widely between provinces and many, particularly those with lower incomes, find it difficult to pay for their necessary medications. Seniors who do not have post-retirement benefit plans - and these are the majority - also need to pay out of pocket for dental care, physiotherapy, mental health care and other needed supports. We recommend that all levels of government explore adjusting the basket of services provided through public funding, to make sure that it reflects the needs of the growing number of Canadians burdened by chronic disease. In particular, we recommend that the federal government negotiate a cost-shared program of comprehensive prescription drug coverage with provincial/territorial governments. In conclusion, the CMA believes the committee is wise to consider how we might reduce the impact - on individual patients, the health care system and society - of chronic disease related to aging. Chronic disease management is a complex problem, but warrants close attention as it is now the dominant form of health care in Canada. We look forward to the results of the Committee's deliberations.
Documents
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CMA's Presentation to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health : H1N1 Preparedness and Response

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy9699
Date
2009-10-05
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2009-10-05
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
Good afternoon Madame Chair. The Canadian Medical Association is pleased to address the committee as part of its ongoing study of H1N1 planning and response. In the broad context of pandemic planning, the CMA has focused on developing information and education tools on cma.ca to ensure Canada's doctors are equipped to provide the best possible care to patients. We have also engaged in discussions with the Assembly of First Nations to address workforce shortages in First Nations and Inuit communities during a pandemic. Despite the work of governments and others, there remains much to do. To provide optimal patient care, individual physicians - primary care providers and specialists alike - require: * Regular updates on the status of H1N1 in their community; * Timely and easy access to diagnostic and treatment recommendations with clear messages tailored to their service level; * Rapid responses to questions; and * Adequate supplies of key resources such as masks, medications, diagnostic kits and vaccines. The CMA commends federal, provincial and territorial governments for creating the Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan for the Health Care Sector. The CMA was pleased to provide feedback on elements of the plan and we are participating on the anti-viral and clinical care task groups. There are three issues that still must be addressed: First, the communications gap between public health officials and front-line providers; Second, the lack of adequate resources on the front lines; and finally, variability that exists across the country. The Communications Gap Physicians must be involved in the planning stages and must receive consistent, timely and practical plain-language information. They should not have to seek information out from various websites or other sources, or through the media. This communications gap also includes a gap between information and action. For example, we are told to keep at least a six-foot distance between an infected patient and other patients and staff. This will not be possible in a doctor's waiting room, nor will disinfecting examining and waiting rooms in-between each patient. Adequate resources Patient volumes may increase dramatically and there are serious concerns about how to manage supplies if an office is overwhelmed. There is also considerable concern over whether we can keep enough health care professionals healthy to care for patients, and whether we have enough respirators and specialty equipment to treat patients. Intensive-care units of hospitals can also expect to be severely strained as a second-wave pandemic hits. This speaks to a general lack of surge capacity within the system. Also, pandemic planning for ICUs and other hospital units must include protocols to determine which patients can benefit most when there are not enough respirators and personnel to provide the required care for all who need it. Beyond the need for more supplies, however, there is also the concern that there are only so many hours in a day. Doctors will always strive to provide care for those who need it, but if treating H1N1 cases takes all of our time, who will be available to care for patients with other conditions? Variability across the country CMA has consulted with provincial and territorial medical associations and their level of involvement in government planning as well as the general state of preparedness varies greatly. There is also marked inconsistency province-to-province around immunization schedules. We need a clear statement of recommendation to clear up this variability. In summary, there remains a great deal of uncertainty among physicians about: the vaccine, the supply of antivirals, the role of assessment centres and mass immunization clinics, delegated acts, and physicians' medico-legal obligations and protections. The bottom line is that there is still more work to do at all levels before front-line clinicians feel well prepared with information, tools and strategies they need. The CMA was pleased to meet with Dr. Butler-Jones to discuss our concerns last week and will continue to work closely with Public Health Agency of Canada to identify gaps and to prepare user-friendly information for clinicians. Thank you and I welcome any questions.
Documents
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Comprehensive school health

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy748
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-03-02
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD92-05-192
That the Canadian Association of School Health (CASH) statement on comprehensive school health be endorsed by the Canadian Medical Association.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1992-03-02
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD92-05-192
That the Canadian Association of School Health (CASH) statement on comprehensive school health be endorsed by the Canadian Medical Association.
Text
That the Canadian Association of School Health (CASH) statement on comprehensive school health be endorsed by the Canadian Medical Association.
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32 records – page 1 of 4.