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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


79 records – page 2 of 8.

Blood Pressure Canada

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8922
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-108
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to adopt the recommendations of Hypertension Canada aimed at reducing adult Canadians' sodium intake to between 1200 - 2300 mg per day by Jan. 1, 2020.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC07-108
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to adopt the recommendations of Hypertension Canada aimed at reducing adult Canadians' sodium intake to between 1200 - 2300 mg per day by Jan. 1, 2020.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to adopt the recommendations of Hypertension Canada aimed at reducing adult Canadians' sodium intake to between 1200 - 2300 mg per day by Jan. 1, 2020.
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Canada Extended Health Services Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8840
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-10
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-10
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association will develop a policy framework and design principles for access to publicly funded medically necessary services in the home and community setting that can become the basis for urging governments to develop a Canada Extended Health Services Act.
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Canada Health Act

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8856
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-26
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-26
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
Text
The Canadian Medical Association and its provincial/territorial medical associations will advocate for a discussion on opening the Canada Health Act because it limits the ability to fund "the continuum of care".
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Canada’s child and youth health charter

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy10327
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Policy endorsement
Last Reviewed
2018-03-03
Date
2007-05-29
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
CHILD AND YOUTH HEALTH IN CANADA THEIR CHARTER — OUR CHALLENGE “There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way it treats its children.” Nelson Mandela “One generation plants the trees; another gets the shade.” Chinese Proverb Children and youth have always been a priority for the doctors of Canada — the Child and Youth Health Initiative of the Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Paediatric Society and the College of Family Physicians of Canada is evidence of that. We three organizations joined together in November 2006 to launch the Child and Youth Health Initiative. In September 2004, Canada’s first ministers committed to “improving the health status of Canadians through a collaborative process.” This led to an agreement on health goals for Canada. The first of them is “Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” At the international level, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child sets out the wider rights of all children and young people, including the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. We now owe it to our children and youth to develop tangible health goals and targets. From the outset of the partnership, we were acutely aware that only a broad societal coalition could achieve the overarching goal of excellence in child and youth health in Canada. Making the health of children and youth a national priority requires a coalition of child and youth health champions, including governments, parents, health providers, businesses, schools, teachers and communities. To start that process, we created Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter. An action framework was then developed called Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge because a charter alone will not deliver on the vision of the children and youth of Canada being among the healthiest in the world. Together, we believe they will help to build a coalition of child and youth health champions because they give the people who can make a difference in children and youth health a rallying point. The credibility and success of the Charter and the Challenge require broad, inclusive consultation and a commitment to child and youth health from society at large. The Child and Youth Health Summit, held April 25-26, 2007, was about consultation and commitment to making a difference to the health and well-being of children and youth. This document contains Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter, which was one of the focuses of the summit. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Challenge and Canada’s Child and Youth Health Declaration, are the other components of our commitment and promise to take action for the children of Canada. These documents can be found at www.ourchildren.ca. Canada’s Child and Youth Health Charter In 2005, Canada’s federal, provincial and territorial governments created pan-Canadian health goals. The first of them is “Canada is a country where: Our children reach their full potential, growing up happy, healthy, confident and secure.” To reach their potential, children and youth need to grow up in a place where they can thrive — spiritually, emotionally, mentally, physically and intellectually — and get high-quality health care when they need it. That place must have three fundamental elements: a safe and secure environment; good health and development; and a full range of health resources available to all. Children and youth of distinct populations in Canada, including First Nations, Inuit and Métis, must be offered equal opportunities as other Canadian children and youth through culturally relevant resources. Canada must become: 1. A place with a safe and secure environment: a) Clean water, air and soil; b) Protection from injury, exploitation and discrimination; and c) Healthy family, homes and communities. 2. A place where children and youth can have good health and development: a) Prenatal and maternal care for the best possible health at birth; b) Nutrition for proper growth, development and long-term health; c) Early learning opportunities and high-quality care, at home and in the community; d) Opportunities and encouragement for physical activity; e) High-quality primary and secondary education; f) Affordable and available post-secondary education; and g) A commitment to social well-being and mental health. 3. A place where a full range of health resources is available: a) Basic health care including immunization, drugs and dental health; b) Mental health care and early help programs for children and youth; c) Timely access to specialty diagnostic and health services; d) Measurement and tracking the health of children and youth; e) Research that focuses on the needs of children and youth; and f) Uninterrupted care as youth move to adult health services and between acute, chronic and community care, as well as between jurisdictions. NOTES 1. The principles of this charter apply to all children and youth in Canada regardless of race, ethnicity, creed, language, gender, physical ability, mental ability, cultural history, or life experience. 2. Principles enshrined in all the goal statements include: a. Universality: The charter applies equally to all children and youth residing in Canada and covers all children and youth from 0-18 years of age. b. Without financial burden: All children and youth in Canada should have access to required health care, health services and drugs regardless of ability to pay. c. Barrier-free access: All children and youth, regardless of ability or circumstance should have appropriate access to optimal health care and health services. d. Measurement and monitoring: Appropriate resources will be available for adequate ongoing collection of data on issues that affect child and youth health and development. e. Safe and secure communities: Communities in Canada must create an environment for children and youth to grow that is safe and secure. 3. The purpose of this charter is to facilitate development of specific goals, objectives, actions and advocacy that will measurably improve child and youth health throughout Canada. 4. Success will be identified as simple, measurable, achievable, and timely goals and objectives for each of the 16 statements in this charter. 5. The initial draft of this charter has been developed by Canada’s physicians focusing on what they can best do to improve child and youth health; however, the support and participation of all individuals and groups interested in child and youth health is encouraged and desired. 6. The primary audience for actions and advocacy arising from this charter will be governments, agencies or individuals who, by virtue of legislation, regulation or policy have the ability to effect change for children and youth. 7. This charter is not a legal document; it represents a commitment by champions of child and youth health in Canada to the health and well-being of all children and youth in Canada. Charter Endorsers The following organizations have endorsed the Child and Youth Health Charter, as of October 9, 2007. Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada Breakfast for Learning Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres Canadian Child and Youth Health Coalition Canadian Healthcare Association Canadian Institute of Child Health Canadian Medical Association Canadian Paediatric Society Canadian Pharmacists Association Canadian Psychological Association Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development Centre for Science in the Public Interest College of Family Physicians of Canada Landon Pearson Resource Centre for the Study of Childhood and Children's Rights Muttart Foundation National Alliance for Children and Youth National Anti-Poverty Organization Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association Paediatric Chairs of Canada Safe Kids Canada, The National Injury Prevention Program of The Hospital for Sick Children Silken's ActiveKids Movement and Silken and Company Productions The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
Documents
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Canada's Child Health Initiative

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8874
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-63
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments and other stakeholders work toward the following priorities: - create a children's commissioner and an Office for Children's Health, with a children's health advisor reporting to the Minister of Health - involve children in everything we do - address Aboriginal child health - develop a national child health strategy and national health goals and targets for children - develop an integrated children's health research strategy and an annual report card on children's health.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-63
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments and other stakeholders work toward the following priorities: - create a children's commissioner and an Office for Children's Health, with a children's health advisor reporting to the Minister of Health - involve children in everything we do - address Aboriginal child health - develop a national child health strategy and national health goals and targets for children - develop an integrated children's health research strategy and an annual report card on children's health.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recommends that governments and other stakeholders work toward the following priorities: - create a children's commissioner and an Office for Children's Health, with a children's health advisor reporting to the Minister of Health - involve children in everything we do - address Aboriginal child health - develop a national child health strategy and national health goals and targets for children - develop an integrated children's health research strategy and an annual report card on children's health.
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Canada's Food Guide

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8919
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-105
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to revise Canada's Food Guide every three years with input from medical associations.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-105
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to revise Canada's Food Guide every three years with input from medical associations.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on the federal government to revise Canada's Food Guide every three years with input from medical associations.
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The Canadian Medical Association recognizes the participation, roles and valuable contributions of seniors

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11605
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC15-25
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes the participation, roles and valuable contributions of seniors in our society.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2015-08-26
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC15-25
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes the participation, roles and valuable contributions of seniors in our society.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association recognizes the participation, roles and valuable contributions of seniors in our society.
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Canadian Medical Association submission on Bill C-462 Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act.

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy11542
Date
2015-05-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2015-05-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to present this brief to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance regarding Bill C-462 Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act. The Canadian Medical Association represents 78,000 physicians in Canada; its mission is to serve and unite the physicians of Canada and to be the national advocate, in partnership with the people of Canada, for the highest standards of health and health care. The CMA is pleased that the House of Commons has made Bill C-462 a priority. This bill is an important step toward addressing the unintended consequences that have emerged from the Disability Tax Credit since 2005. Part 2: Issues to be addressed In 2005, the Disability Tax Credit was expanded to allow individuals to back-file for up to 10 years. While this was a welcome tax measure for individuals with disabilities, the CMA has been urging the Canada Revenue Agency to address the numerous unintended consequences that have emerged. Central among these has been the emergence of a “cottage industry” of third-party companies engaged in a number of over-reaching tactics. The practices of these companies have included aggressive promotional activities to seek and encourage individuals to file the Disability Tax Credit. The primary driver behind these tactics is profit; some companies are charging fees of up to 40 per cent of an individual’s refund when the tax credit is approved. Further to targeting a vulnerable population, these activities have yielded an increase in the quantity of Disability Tax Credit forms in physician offices and contributed to red tape in the health sector. In some cases, third parties have placed physicians in an adversarial position with their patients. We are pleased that this bill attempts to address the concerns we have raised. The CMA supports Bill C-462 as a necessary measure to address the issues that have emerged since the changes to the Disability Tax Credit in 2005. However, to avoid additional unintended consequences, the CMA recommends that the Finance Committee address three issues prior to advancing Bill C-462. First, as currently written, Bill C-462 proposes to apply the same requirements to physicians as to third-party companies if physicians apply a fee for form completion, a typical practice for uninsured physician services. Such fees are subject to guidelines and oversight by provincial and territorial medical regulatory colleges (see Appendix 1: CMA Policy on Third Party Forms: The Physician Role). The CMA recommends that the Finance Committee: Amend the definition of “promoters” under section 2 to exclude “a health care practitioner duly licensed under the applicable regulatory authority who provides health care and treatment.” . If the committee imports the term “person” from the Income Tax Act, then the applicable section of Bill C-462 should be amended to specify that, for the purposes of the act, “Person does not include a health care practitioner duly licensed under the applicable regulatory authority who provides health care and treatment.” Second, the CMA is concerned that one of the reasons individuals may be engaging the services of third-party companies is a lack of awareness of the purpose and benefits of the Disability Tax Credit. Additional efforts are required to ensure that the Disability Tax Credit form (Form T2201) be more informative and user-friendly for patients. Form T2201 should explain more clearly to patients the reason behind the tax credit, and explicitly indicate there is no need to use third-party companies to submit the claim to the CRA. The CMA recommends that the Finance Committee: . Recommend that the Canada Revenue Agency undertake additional efforts to ensure that the Disability Tax Credit form is more informative, accessible and user-friendly for patients. Finally, the CMA recommends that a privacy assessment be undertaken before the bill moves forward in the legislative process. It appears that, as written, Bill C-462 would authorize the inter-departmental sharing of personal information. The CMA raises this issue for consideration because protecting the privacy of patient information is a key duty of a physician under the CMA Code of Ethics. Part 3: Closing The CMA encourages the Finance Committee to address these issues to ensure that Bill C-462 resolves existing problems with the Disability Tax Credit while not introducing new ones. The CMA appreciates the opportunity to provide input to the Finance Committee’s study of this bill and, with the amendments outlined herein, supports its passage. Summary of Recommendations Recommendation 1 The definition of “promoters” under section 2 of Bill C-462 should be amended to exclude “a health care practitioner duly licensed under the applicable regulatory authority who provides health care and treatment.” Recommendation 2 If the Committee imports the definition of “persons” from the Income Tax Act, the applicable section of Bill C-462 should be amended to specify that, for the purposes of the act, “Person does not include a health care practitioner duly licensed under the applicable regulatory authority who provides health care and treatment.” Recommendation 3 The Canada Revenue Agency should undertake additional efforts to ensure that the Disability Tax Credit form is informative, accessible and user-friendly. Recommendation 4 Prior to advancing in the legislative process, Bill C-462 should undergo a privacy assessment.
Documents
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Case-mix groups

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8872
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-60
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canadian Institute for Health Information to develop a state-of-the-art assessment of the development and application of case-mix groups across the provinces and territories.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC07-60
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canadian Institute for Health Information to develop a state-of-the-art assessment of the development and application of case-mix groups across the provinces and territories.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the Canadian Institute for Health Information to develop a state-of-the-art assessment of the development and application of case-mix groups across the provinces and territories.
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Climate change and the health of Aboriginal populations

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy8897
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-82
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to put into place measures to mitigate the impact of climate change on the health of Aboriginal populations in remote northern regions as traditional subsistence practices are disrupted due to adverse changes in water resources, fisheries, forests, wildlife and ecosystems.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2014-03-01
Date
2007-08-22
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC07-82
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to put into place measures to mitigate the impact of climate change on the health of Aboriginal populations in remote northern regions as traditional subsistence practices are disrupted due to adverse changes in water resources, fisheries, forests, wildlife and ecosystems.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association urges the federal government to put into place measures to mitigate the impact of climate change on the health of Aboriginal populations in remote northern regions as traditional subsistence practices are disrupted due to adverse changes in water resources, fisheries, forests, wildlife and ecosystems.
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79 records – page 2 of 8.