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CMA PolicyBase

Policies that advocate for the medical profession and Canadians


17 records – page 2 of 2.

Lack of access to insured health services

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13711
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-12
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Resolution
GC17-12
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls on governments to address the lack of access to insured health services for those residing in Canada, regardless of immigration status.
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Mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13714
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health care and patient safety
Resolution
GC17-24
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association calls for mandatory labelling, warnings and a recall system for prescription pharmaceuticals sold in Canada that contain gluten and/or priority allergens.
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Nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13706
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-08
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health care and patient safety
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-08
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports mandatory adherence to national or province/territoryspecific nutritional guidelines in Canadian schools, including a means to monitor and report school compliance.
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Physical activity history

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13719
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health information and e-health
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-25
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of physical activity history within the vital sign section of electronic medical record systems.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Date
2017-08-23
Topics
Health information and e-health
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
GC17-25
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of physical activity history within the vital sign section of electronic medical record systems.
Text
The Canadian Medical Association supports the inclusion of physical activity history within the vital sign section of electronic medical record systems.
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Preventive practices of health professionals

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy747
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1991-10-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD92-03-34
That the Canadian Medical Association approve in principle the concept of enhancing preventive practices of health professionals.
Policy Type
Policy resolution
Last Reviewed
2017-03-04
Date
1991-10-19
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Resolution
BD92-03-34
That the Canadian Medical Association approve in principle the concept of enhancing preventive practices of health professionals.
Text
That the Canadian Medical Association approve in principle the concept of enhancing preventive practices of health professionals.
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Response to Health Canada's proposed order amending the Schedule to the Tobacco Act (Menthol)

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13797
Date
2017-01-10
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2017-01-10
Topics
Health systems, system funding and performance
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Text
The Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is pleased to provide this response to Health Canada's Proposed Order Amending the Schedule to the Tobacco Act (Menthol), as found in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on November 5, 2016. The CMA believes that the federal government has an important role in prevention and smoking cessation, particularly among youth, to end smoking within Canada. As early as 2008, the CMA called for the federal government to ban menthol in tobacco products. In 2014, the CMA submitted a brief to Health Canada on the proposal to amend the Tobacco Act to restrict the use of additives in tobacco products. One of the CMA's concerns at that time was that the Act excluded menthol as a flavouring agent in tobacco products. Therefore, the CMA strongly supports Health Canada's proposed order to prohibit menthol in cigarettes, blunt wraps and cigars. The proposed order has the ability to deter youth from smoking since menthol makes smoking more palatable by masking the harshness of tobacco smoke. This may lead to not only a decline in youth smokers but a decline in the number of smokers in the overall Canadian population as well. The CMA issued its first warning to the public about the dangers of tobacco in 1954, and we continue to advocate for stronger measures to control smoking. Banning the use of menthol is one step towards achieving this goal. Sincerely, Jeff Blackmer, MD, MHSc, FRCPC Vice-President, Medical Professionalism Canadian Medical Association
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Social equity and increasing productivity

https://policybase.cma.ca/en/permalink/policy13725
Date
2017-09-21
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
  1 document  
Policy Type
Parliamentary submission
Date
2017-09-21
Topics
Population health/ health equity/ public health
Health systems, system funding and performance
Text
Canadians are living longer, healthier lives than ever before. This is due in large part to Canada’s health care system, the people working in it, research and medical school excellence, public and private investments and the many advances that have been made over the decades in medicine. However, the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) is deeply concerned that Canada’s health care system isn’t keeping up with the health care needs of older Canadians. When publicly funded health care was created about 50 years ago, Canada’s population was just over 20 million and the average life expectancy was 71. Today, our population is over 30 million and the average life expectancy is 10 years longer. The aging of our population is both an immense success story and the most pressing policy imperative of our time. Our submission and recommendations focus on seniors care. We believe the ability of our country to meet the health care needs of this segment of our population is indeed of such high priority that we have come to these consultations with this single issue in mind. While daunting, the task ahead is by no means impossible and will ultimately result in numerous health and financial benefits. By providing the means to expand long-term care and home care capacity, the Government of Canada will improve health care for seniors and others, create new jobs and add billions of dollars annually to the Gross Domestic Product. Furtherbed demand will vary over this period, peaking in 2032 and beginning to decline thereafter. The five-year projection for beds is as follows: Table 1: Projected shortage in long-term care beds, 2017–2021 Number of additional Year beds required 2017 15,740* 2018 6,940 2019 6,450 2020 6,620 2021 7,140 Projected 42,890 five-year shortage *Note: the figure for additional beds required in 2017 includes 8,420 beds’ worth of demand that is currently unmet, in the form of patients in alternate level of care beds in hospitals. The Conference Board estimated the cost to construct 10,500 beds (the average number of new beds required per year from 2017 to 2035) at $3.4 billion per year and $63.7 billion in total, on the basis of a cost estimate of $320,000 per bed (all figures in 2017 dollars). These figures include both public and private spending. This forecast does not include the significant investments required to renovate and retrofit the existing stock of residential facilities. The average number of new long-term care beds needed in Canada every year up to 2035 is 10,500. The Conference Board of Canada estimates the cost of this to be $3.4 billion per year, for a total public and private expenditure of $63.7 billion. This forecast does not include the investments needed to renovate and retrofit existing long-term care homes. Construction of new residential care models and renovation/retrofitting of existing facilities will provide significant economic opportunities for many communities across Canada. The construction and maintenance of 10,500 new residential care beds will yield direct economic benefits that include a $1.4 billion annual average contribution to GDP supporting 14,600 jobs yearly during the capital investment phase and a $5.3 billion annual average contribution to GDP supporting an average of 58,300 jobs annually during the facility operation phase. By comparison, nursing homes and residential care facilities employed about 412,000 people in 2016. These investments would also close the significant gap between the projected residential care bed shortages and currently planned investment. When indirect economic contributions are included, the average estimated annual contribution to Canada’s GDP from the construction and operation of the new beds reaches $12.4 billion, supporting an average of 130,000 jobs annually between 2017 and 2035 (in construction, care provision and other sectors). This bed projection provides a sense of the immense challenge Canada faces in addressing the needs of a vulnerable segment of its population of older seniors. A recent report by the Canadian Institute for Health Information indicated that residential care capacity will need to double over the next 20 years (assuming no change in how care is currently provided), necessitating a transformation in how seniors care is provided in Canada across the continuum of care.13 Efforts to de-hospitalize the system and deal with Canada’s aging population should be part of an overall national seniors strategy. Such a strategy was called for previously by the CMA, other organizations (e.g., the National Association of Federal Retirees), the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance14 and over 50,000 Canadians.15 Fixing seniors care will contribute to the renewal of the entire health system and will improve the productivity of health care delivery across the country. The differing fiscal capacities of the provinces in the current economic climate will mean that improvements in seniors care will advance at an uneven pace. The federal government can provide significant pan-Canadian assistance by investing in residential care infrastructure models. GDP # of jobs contributions Capitalinvestment phase Operation phase 14,600 58,300 $1.4 billion $5.3 billion With indirect contributions 130,000 $12.4 billion RECOMMENDATIONS: The CMA recommends that the federal government provide targeted funding to support the development of a pan-Canadian seniors strategy to address the needs of the aging population. The CMA recommends that the federal government include capital investment in residential care infrastructure, including retrofit and renovation, as part of its commitment to invest in social infrastructure. Caregivers are the backbone of any care system. A 2012 Statistics Canada study found that 5.4 million Canadians provided care to a senior family member or friend. While this care was most often received by a senior in their own residence, 62% of caregivers said the care recipients lived in a home separate from the caregiver’s home.16 Age-related needs are the most common reason for care requirements.17 Caregivers are of all ages; for instance, 27% of caregivers were between the ages of 15 and 29 years.18 One study has forecast that the number of Canadians requiring care will double over the next 30 years.19 Caregiver costs Work $5.5 in lost absence: productivity billion Personal upwards of or more out-of-a yearpocket: $2,000 A Statistics Canada study found that 56% of caregivers living with the care recipient provided at least 10 hours of care a week. Approximately 22% of caregivers helping a resident in a care facility also provided at least 10 hours of care a week. The chief condition for which care was provided was dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (25%).16 The cost to employers in lost productivity because of caregiving-related absenteeism is estimated at $5.5 billion annually.20 Caregivers also report high out-of-pocket expenses. This is especially true for those living with the care recipient: over 25% spend at least $2,000 annually on out-of-pocket expenses.16 Caregivers require a range of supports including education/training, peer support, respite care and financial assistance. Canadians want governments to do more to help seniors and their family caregivers.21 The federal government’s new combined Canada Caregiver Credit (CCC) is a non­refundable credit to individuals caring for dependent relatives with infirmities (including persons with disabilities). The CCC will be more accessible and will extend tax relief to more caregivers by including dependent relatives who do not live with their caregivers and by increasing the income threshold. Notwithstanding these changes and the greater flexibility for caregivers to use Employment Insurance benefits, caregivers will require more support. The CMA recommends making the new CCC a refundable tax credit for caregivers whose tax owing is less than the total credit, resulting in a refund payment to provide further financial support for low-income families. RECOMMENDATION: The CMA recommends that the federal government improve awareness of the new Canada Caregiver Credit and amend it to make it a refundable tax credit for caregivers. The federal government’s commitment to provide $6 billion over 10 years to the provinces and territories for home care, including support for caregivers, is a welcomed step toward improving opportunities for seniors to remain in their homes. As with previous bilateral funding agreements, it will be important to establish clear operating principles between the parties to oversee the funding implementation including support for caregivers. RECOMMENDATION: RECOMMENDATION: The CMA recommends that the federal government develop explicit operating principles for the home care funding that has been negotiated with the provinces and territories to recognize funding for caregivers and respite care as eligible areas of investment. The federal government’s recent funding investment in home care and mental health is a recognition that Canada has under-invested in home and community-based care to date. Other countries have more supportive systems and programs in place — systems and programs that Canada should consider. 5 The CMA recommends the federal government convene an all-party parliamentary international study that includes stakeholders to examine the approaches taken to mitigate the inappropriate use of acute care for elderly persons and provide support for caregivers. T he CMA recognizes the federal government’s commitment to help Canadians be as productive as possible in their workplaces and in their communities. Implementing these recommendations as an integrated package is essential to stitching together the elements of community-based and residential care for seniors. In addition to making a meaningful contribution to meeting the future care needs of Canada’s aging population, these recommendations will mitigate the impacts of economic pressures on individuals as well as jurisdictions. The CMA would welcome the opportunity to provide further information and its rationale for each recommendation. 1 Simpson C. Code Gridlock: Why Canada needs a national seniors strategy. Address to the Canadian Club of Ottawa by Dr. Christopher Simpson, President, Canadian Medical Association; 2014 Nov. 18; Ottawa, Ontario. Available: https://www.cma.ca/En/Lists/Medias/Code_Gridlock_ final.pdf (accessed 2016 Sep 22). 2 Canadian Institute for Health Information. Seniors and alternate level of care: building on our knowledge. Ottawa: The Institute; 2012 Nov. Available: https://secure.cihi.ca/ free_products/ALC_AIB_EN.pdf (accessed 2016 Sep 22). 3 Access to Care, Cancer Care Ontario. Alternate level of care (ALC) [Prepared for the Ontario Hospital Association]. Toronto: Ontario Hospital Association (OHA); 2016 May. 4 McCloskey R, Jarrett P, Stewart C, et al. Alternate level of care patients in hospitals: What does dementia have to do with this? Can Geriatr J. 2014 Sep 5;17(3):88–94. 5 North East Local Health Integration Network. HOME First shifts care of seniors to HOME. LHINfo Minute, Northeastern Ontario Health Care Update. Sudbury: The Network; 2011. Cited by Home Care Ontario. Facts & figures - publicly funded home care. Hamilton: Home Care Ontario; 2017 Jun. Available: http://www. homecareontario.ca/home-care-services/facts-figures/ publiclyfundedhomecare (accessed 2016 Sep 22). 6 Sponagle J. Nunavut struggles to care for elders closer to home. CBC News. 2017 Jun 5. Available: http://www.cbc. ca/news/canada/north/nunavut-seniors-plan-1.4145757 (accessed 2017 Jun 30). 7 Health Quality Ontario. Wait times for long-term care homes. Toronto: Health Quality Ontario; 2017. Available: http://www.hqontario.ca/System-Performance/Long­ Term-Care-Home-Performance/Wait-Times (accessed 2017 Jun 22). 8 Alzheimer Society Canada. The Canadian Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Partnership: a collective vision for a national dementia strategy for Canada. Toronto: Alzheimer Society Canada; undated. Available: http:// www.alzheimer.ca/~/media/Files/national/Advocacy/ CADDP_Strategic_Objectives_e.pdf (accessed 2016 Sep 22). 9 Public Health Agency of Canada. The Chief Public Health Officer’s report on the state of public health in Canada, 2014: public health in the future. Ottawa: Public Health Agency of Canada; 2014. Available: https://www.canada. ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/migration/phac-aspc/ cphorsphc-respcacsp/2014/assets/pdf/2014-eng.pdf (accessed 2016 Sep 19). 10 Statistics Canada. Population projections: Canada, the provinces and territories, 2013 to 2063. The Daily. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2014 Sep 17. Available: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140917/ dq140917a-eng.htm (accessed 2016 Sep 19). 11 The Conference Board of Canada. A cost-benefit analysis of meeting the demand for long-term care beds. Ottawa: Conference Board of Canada; forthcoming. 12 Lazurko M, Hearn B. Canadian continuing care scenarios 1999–2041. KPMG final project report to FPT Advisory Committee on Health Services. Ottawa: KPMG; 2000. Cited by Canadian Healthcare Association. New directions for facility-based long-term care. Ottawa: The Association; 2009. Available: https://www.advantageontario.ca/ oanhssdocs/Issue_Positions/External_Resources/ Sept2009_New_Directions_for_Facility_Based_LTC.pdf (accessed 2017 Jun 30). 13 Canadian Institute for Health Information. Seniors in transition: exploring pathways across the care continuum. Ottawa: The Institute; 2017. Available: https://www.cihi. ca/sites/default/files/document/seniors-in-transition­ report-2017-en.pdf (accessed 2017 Jun 30). 14 Standing Senate Committee on National Finance. Getting ready: for a new generation of active seniors. First interim report. Ottawa: The Senate; 2017 Jun. Available: https:// sencanada.ca/content/sen/committee/421/NFFN/Reports/ NFFN_Final19th_Aging_e.pdf (accessed 2017 Jun 30). 15 Canadian Medical Association. Demand a plan. Ottawa: The Association; 2017. Available: http://www.demandaplan.ca/ (accessed 2017 Jun 30). 16 Turcotte M, Sawaya C. Senior care: differences by type of housing. Insights on Canadian society. Cat. No. 75-006­ X. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2015 Feb 25. Available: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2015001/ article/14142-eng.pdf (accessed 2016 Sep 22). 17 Sinha M. Portrait of caregivers, 2012. Spotlight on Canadians: results from the General Social Survey. Cat. No. 89-652-X – No. 001. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2013 Sep. Available: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-652­ x/89-652-x2013001-eng.htm (accessed 2016 Sep 22). 18 Bleakney A. Young Canadians providing care. Spotlight on Canadians: results from the General Social Survey. Cat. No. 89-652-X – No. 003. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2014 Sep. Available: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-652­ x/89-652-x2014003-eng.htm (accessed 2017 Jun 30). 19 Carrière Y, Keefe J, Légaré J, et al. Projecting the future availability of the informal support network of the elderly population and assessing its impact on home care services. Demography Division Research Paper Cat. No. 91F0015M – No. 009. Ottawa: Statistics Canada; 2008. Available: http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2009/ statcan/91F0015M/91f0015m2008009-eng.pdf (accessed 2017 Jun 30). 20 Ceridian Canada. Double duty: the caregiving crisis in the workplace [Blog post]. Ottawa: Ceridian Canada, 2015 Nov 5. Available: http://www.ceridian.ca/blog/2015/11/ double-duty-the-caregiving-crisis-in-the-workplace/ (accessed 2016 Sep 22). 21 Ipsos Public Affairs, HealthCareCAN, National Health Leadership Conference. National Health Leadership Conference report. Toronto: Ipsos Public Affairs; 2016 Jun 6. Available: http://www.nhlc-cnls.ca/assets/2016%20 Ottawa/NHLCIpsosReportJune1.pdf (accessed 2016 Jun 6).
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17 records – page 2 of 2.